Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-22-2014, 01:22 PM   #85
Rivet Master
 
1981 31' Excella II
New Market , Alabama
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 5,648
I would not trust anything European made that is not made in Germany and even some of that is not made well. This rules out England, Italy, France, Spain etc. If it makes you feel trendy then go for it. The statistics speak for themselves as far as reliability ratings from these countries.

Perry
__________________

__________________
perryg114 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-22-2014, 01:27 PM   #86
Top
Always learning
 
Top's Avatar
 
1972 29' Ambassador
1962 19' Globetrotter
1951 21' Flying Cloud
Central , Texas
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 2,779
Images: 24
Blog Entries: 2
Send a message via Yahoo to Top
Perry,
Please show some statistics and let them speak!
__________________

__________________
Lance

Work is never done, so take time to play!
Top is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2014, 10:14 AM   #87
Rivet Master
 
switz's Avatar

 
2014 31' Classic
2015 23' International
2013 25' FB International
Apache Junction , Arizona
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 4,799
Images: 8
The reliability proof of the Fiat V6 will come to the surface after a year or so of use in SouthWest summer heat, in the mountains and general use. I think the temperatures are high, as compared to our 6.7L Cummins and automatic transmission. We are going down the road at 18,000+ pounds and our max speed is 65 (alternating between 5th and 6th gears depending on the grade) or lower depending on the local speed limits at the time.

I have real time digital temperature sensors and display on my Cummins engine oil and turbocharger EGT, transmission ands both differentials. Our temperatures are significantly lower.

We still have additional cargo capacity of over 750 pounds in both the truck and the trailer which would not be the case with a ½ ton rated vehicle.

I hope it does work for the lower weight Airstreams.
__________________
WBCCI Life Member 5123, AIR 70341, 4CU, WD9EMC

TV - 2012 Dodge 2500 4x4 Cummins HO, automatic, Centramatics, Kelderman level ride airbag suspension, bed shell

2014 31' Classic model 30 twin beds, 50 amp service, 900 watt solar system, Centramatics, Dill TPMS, disc brakes, 16" tires & wheels
switz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2014, 11:34 AM   #88
Rivet Master
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 811
I did exaggerate the price differential between the diesel and gas versions of the 1500. I compared the gas stripper to the gussied up diesel.
I stand by my overheating comment. Anytime the temp moves out of normal and goes over 200 degrees towing a trailer within the tow range of the vehicle there is a problem. Your tow vehicle should be able to tow your rig up an 8% grade at 100 degree temperatures without the coolant temps increasing more than a few degrees over the thermostat controlled normal.
There is zero margin for error if there is a malfunction such as a broken belt, the engine will boil over in a heartbeat. If you running at 180 or so, you have time to pull over and save the engine.
The transmission cooler is in the radiator. The transmission fluid runs hotter than the coolant temps. There is a direct correlation between short transmission life and hot temps.
__________________
handn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2014, 07:34 PM   #89
3 Rivet Member
 
2003 25' Safari
Riverside , California
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 234
Quote:
Originally Posted by handn View Post
I did exaggerate the price differential between the diesel and gas versions of the 1500. I compared the gas stripper to the gussied up diesel.
I stand by my overheating comment. Anytime the temp moves out of normal and goes over 200 degrees towing a trailer within the tow range of the vehicle there is a problem. Your tow vehicle should be able to tow your rig up an 8% grade at 100 degree temperatures without the coolant temps increasing more than a few degrees over the thermostat controlled normal.
There is zero margin for error if there is a malfunction such as a broken belt, the engine will boil over in a heartbeat. If you running at 180 or so, you have time to pull over and save the engine.
The transmission cooler is in the radiator. The transmission fluid runs hotter than the coolant temps. There is a direct correlation between short transmission life and hot temps.
You know for a fact the trans cooler is in the radiator or are you assuming ?
__________________
2003 25' Safari
2005 Ram 2500 4x4
1994 Ram 2500 4x4
2015 Toyota Tacoma trd 4x4
2000 Jeep Wrangler 4x4
Bob4x4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2014, 10:03 PM   #90
Vintage Kin
 
slowmover's Avatar
 
Fort Worth , Texas
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 7,598
Images: 1
FWIW, the 15L Cummins ISX in my work Peterbilt tractor runs oil temps at 220-230F constantly. Coolant is at 185-195F under a load, to above 205F pulling a grade under load (dropping two gears under full throttle) when the fan clutch cuts in (or I choose to run it manually prior to ascent). This is not a highway truck, per se, but spec'd to run the unpaved lease roads in the oilfield. We lately are making runs from the Gulf Coast all over to the TX/OK drilling service/supply centers.

The mpg reported above is the same as my '04 Cummins with GCW of 17k at 59-mph/1,725-rpm and slightly lower than my solo average (but 1k+ over original delivery weight).

I'd spec the 2500 CTD with air-ride and automatic to make the best comparison.

.
__________________
1990 35' Silver Streak Sterling; 9k GVWR.
2004 DODGE Cummins 305/555; 6-manual; 9k GVWR.
Hensley Arrow. 9-cpm solo, 15-cpm towing
Sold: Silver Streak Model 3411
slowmover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-24-2014, 10:51 PM   #91
Rivet Master
 
ROBERTSUNRUS's Avatar

 
2005 25' Safari
Salem , Oregon
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 7,269
Images: 18
Blog Entries: 51
Overheated?

Hi, this information dates back the late 60's and early 70's from General Motors and most of it is still the same with all automotive engines today.

Water boils at 212 Degrees.

The boiling point increases 3 degrees per pound of pressure.

Most radiator caps were 15 lbs.

This gives you 45 more degrees before boiling.

Now we are at 257 degrees.

Now add 30 more degrees with a proper 50/50 mixture of coolant.

Now we hit a max of 287 degrees before boil over.

General Motors set their idiot light at 262 degrees.

Engine damage starts only when the water/coolant boils out of the radiator and into the street.

Some newer vehicles [Corvettes] have up to 25 lb pressure caps.

Worrying about a measly 200 to 220 degrees is like panicking because one rivet popped on your trailer.
__________________
Bob

2005 Safari 25-B
"Le Petit Chateau Argent"
[ Small Silver Castle ]
2000 Navigator / 2014 F-150 Eco-Boost / Equal-i-zer / P-3
YAMAHA 2400 / AIR #12144
ROBERTSUNRUS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2014, 08:51 AM   #92
Top
Always learning
 
Top's Avatar
 
1972 29' Ambassador
1962 19' Globetrotter
1951 21' Flying Cloud
Central , Texas
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 2,779
Images: 24
Blog Entries: 2
Send a message via Yahoo to Top
Apples or Pumpkins?

I wonder why some of you feel the need to compare a 1500 with a 2500. They are apples and pumpkins. The RAM 1500 diesel should be compared with other same category trucks like the Ford F-150, Silverado 1500, Toyota Tundra, Nissan Titan etal. There is no question that a RAM 2500 with 6.7l Cummins will do more than the RAM 1500 with a 3.0l diesel. But, not everyone wants or needs a truck with the capabilities of the RAM 2500. Not to mention they cost more to purchase, cost more to maintain, insurance is higher and they consume more fuel.
When the Titan and Tundra diesels comes out in a few years with the V8 Cummins, there will be more apples to compare apples.
__________________
Lance

Work is never done, so take time to play!
Top is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2014, 09:38 AM   #93
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
K.C. , Missouri
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by ROBERTSUNRUS View Post
Hi, this information dates back the late 60's and early 70's from General Motors and most of it is still the same with all automotive engines today.

Water boils at 212 Degrees.

The boiling point increases 3 degrees per pound of pressure.

Most radiator caps were 15 lbs.

This gives you 45 more degrees before boiling.

Now we are at 257 degrees.

Now add 30 more degrees with a proper 50/50 mixture of coolant.

Now we hit a max of 287 degrees before boil over.

General Motors set their idiot light at 262 degrees.

Engine damage starts only when the water/coolant boils out of the radiator and into the street.

Some newer vehicles [Corvettes] have up to 25 lb pressure caps.

Worrying about a measly 200 to 220 degrees is like panicking because one rivet popped on your trailer.
Ok, so taking this line of reason it's logical ( ? ) extreme, a Corvette with a 25 psi cap and 50/50 mix of coolant, we would have 212+75+30=317 degrees of temp before boil over.
And if "up to the point of water running out on the street" is a-ok.......well......hmmmm....good luck with that.

I'm kinda glad my motors run at something less than 200F water temp.

I wish those with the VM diesel best of luck with them. I hope it works out for all involved.
__________________
gmw photos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2014, 10:58 AM   #94
4 Rivet Member
 
drew05's Avatar
 
2011 25' FB Flying Cloud
Peculiar , Missouri
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 488
I was at the dealer ealier this week, and saw a 1500 with the diesel option. The diesel option package was $4,000 above the 3.0 L V-6. The GVW Rating is 6,950 pounds.

I forget what the Hemi option costs, some had it and some seemed to have it standard or part of a package...
__________________
drew05 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2014, 01:15 PM   #95
jcl
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,049
Quote:
Originally Posted by gmw photos View Post
Ok, so taking this line of reason it's logical ( ? ) extreme, a Corvette with a 25 psi cap and 50/50 mix of coolant, we would have 212+75+30=317 degrees of temp before boil over.
And if "up to the point of water running out on the street" is a-ok.......well......hmmmm....good luck with that.

I'm kinda glad my motors run at something less than 200F water temp.
Don't agree with your extrapolation.

My vehicle was designed with a higher pressure cap as well (2.0 bar, 30 psi). It isn't so the engine can run that hot, it is to handle heat soak after shutdown. I suspect the Corvette is the same.

I wouldn't worry about 220 F coolant at all. And oil that is 20 F hotter than that is fine.
__________________
jcl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-25-2014, 01:57 PM   #96
Top
Always learning
 
Top's Avatar
 
1972 29' Ambassador
1962 19' Globetrotter
1951 21' Flying Cloud
Central , Texas
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 2,779
Images: 24
Blog Entries: 2
Send a message via Yahoo to Top
The 3.0L EcoDiesel is a $4,000 option when the 3.6L Pentastar V6 gasser is standard. The 5.7L Hemi is an $1,150 option when the 3.6L V6 gasser is standard. The 3.0L EcoDiesel is a $2,850 option when the 5.7L Hemi is standard.
__________________
Lance

Work is never done, so take time to play!
Top is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2014, 09:13 AM   #97
Top
Always learning
 
Top's Avatar
 
1972 29' Ambassador
1962 19' Globetrotter
1951 21' Flying Cloud
Central , Texas
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 2,779
Images: 24
Blog Entries: 2
Send a message via Yahoo to Top
RAM with TorgueFlite 8HP70 (ZF)

Quote:
Originally Posted by handn View Post
The transmission cooler is in the radiator. The transmission fluid runs hotter than the coolant temps. There is a direct correlation between short transmission life and hot temps.
From what I can tell looking at the RAM parts manual, the RAM 1500 transmission cooler is an external cooler only. The transmission fluid does not enter the engine coolant radiator. They are completely separate.
Click image for larger version

Name:	Screen Shot 2014-05-26 at 9.11.53 AM.png
Views:	659
Size:	191.3 KB
ID:	212879
Click image for larger version

Name:	Screen Shot 2014-05-26 at 9.08.13 AM.png
Views:	157
Size:	150.8 KB
ID:	212874
There is also a transmission heater. This appears to be plumbing from the transmission through the engine oil cooler.
Click image for larger version

Name:	Screen Shot 2014-05-26 at 9.09.03 AM.png
Views:	123
Size:	182.7 KB
ID:	212875
__________________
Lance

Work is never done, so take time to play!
Top is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-26-2014, 10:02 AM   #98
Rivet Master
 
1981 31' Excella II
New Market , Alabama
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 5,648
Well if you buy one of these, I would definitely get an oil analysis done to determine how the engine is doing. This will tell you things like how hard it is on the oil, and the degree of wear metals in the oil etc. You can also learn what is the optimum oil change interval. They can probably tell you if the engine is consistently running hot and is damaging the oil. An external scan gauge is not a bad idea to determine if the internal gauges are in the ball park or not. You can break anything and having proper gauges well tell you when to back off.

Perry
__________________

__________________
perryg114 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:13 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.