Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-29-2008, 11:13 PM   #1
1 Rivet Member
 
Currently Looking...
Raleigh , North Carolina
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 19
TV for 60s Overlander

OK... So we kind of know the trailer we want, but we don't yet have it--but we've looked at a couple possibilities. Would a 2004 GMC Yukon Denali work as a TV? I'm still sort of confused by this, and we're limited as we need our TV to be my mom-mobile, too. My husband also doesn't want a truck, but wants an SUV... What do you think?

Thank you all for your kindness in responding to my earlier trailer and towing questions. This is a deep subject and I appreciate your expertise!

Liz

2004 GMC Yukon XL Denali specs:

Exterior Length: 219.3 in. Width: 78.8 in. Height: 75.7 in. Wheel Base: 130 in. Ground Clearance: 8.4 in. Curb Weight: 5735 lbs. Gross Weight: 7200 lbs. Interior Front Head Room: 40.7 in. Front Hip Room: 61.4 in. Front Shoulder Room: 65.2 in. Rear Head Room: 39 in. Rear Shoulder Room: 65.1 in. Rear Hip Room: 61.6 in. Front Leg Room: 41.3 in. Rear Leg Room: 39.1 in. Luggage Capacity: 45.7 cu. ft. Maximum Cargo Capacity: 132 cu. ft. Maximum Seating: 8 Performance Data Performance Base Number of Cylinders: 8 Base Engine Size: 6 liters Base Engine Type: V8 Horsepower: 325 hp Max Horsepower: 5200 rpm Torque: 365 ft-lbs. Max Torque: 4000 rpm Maximum Payload: 1460 lbs. Maximum Towing Capacity: 8000 lbs. Drive Type: AWD Turning Circle: 42.3 ft. Fuel Data Fuel Fuel Tank Capacity: 31 gal. EPA Mileage Estimates: (City/Highway) Automatic: : 13 mpg / 17 mpg Range in Miles: (City/Highway) Automatic: 403 mi. / 527 mi.
__________________

__________________
bakerliz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2008, 11:22 PM   #2
Moderator Emeritus
 
overlander64's Avatar
 
1964 26' Overlander
1978 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre
Anna , Illinois
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 5,396
Images: 183
Send a message via Yahoo to overlander64
TV for 60s Overlander

Greetings Liz!

The Yukon Denali with the 6.0 Liter V8 should make a good tow vehicle for your Overlander. With an 8,000 pound trailer tow rating, your loaded gross trailer weight should be well below the 80% of tow capacity that is often used as a guide for good tow vehicle performance.

I own a '64 Overlander that is a few hundred pounds heavier (about 300) than the'60 if it is a single axle Overlander, and I tow with a '99 K2500 GMC Suburban 7.4 Liter -- it is overkill, but I wanted surplus power when traveling in the mountains.

If the Denali doesn't already have it, you will need to add a trailer brake controller as well as a set of trailer tow mirrors if the Denali doesn't have the optional trailer towing mirrors.

Good luck with your tow vehicle selection!

Kevin
__________________

__________________
Kevin D. Allen
WBCCI (Lifetime Member)/VAC/Free Wheelers #6359
AIR #827
1964 Overlander International/1999 GMC K2500 Suburban (7400 VORTEC/4.11 Differentials)
1978 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre/1975 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible (8.2 Liter V8/2.70 Final Drive)
overlander64 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2008, 06:38 PM   #3
1 Rivet Member
 
Currently Looking...
Raleigh , North Carolina
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 19
Thanks Again!

Thank you again, Kevin. I don't know why this all seems so confusing. I hate the idea of having a TV that I have to use for everyday that gets some single-digit amount per gallon. Am I correct in my beliefs that I have to have a wheelbase around 130 for a 26' TT? Could I do it with something smaller, like a Tahoe (109) or a Lincoln Navigator (118)? Also, I don't want a 4WD, right? But is AWD OK?

So far we're looking at a '64 or '68 Overlander...something in that decade...

If the Navigator wouldn't work, where are the issues? Thank you for helping me understand this. It just seems so tricky to me...

Here's the Navigator:
Length: 206 in. Width: 80.2 in. Height: 77.8 in. Wheel Base: 118.8 in. Ground Clearance: 8.6 in. Curb Weight: 5822 lbs. Gross Weight: 7300 lbs. Interior Front Head Room: 39.6 in. Front Hip Room: 58 in. Front Shoulder Room: 63.3 in. Rear Head Room: 39.7 in. Rear Shoulder Room: 63.4 in. Rear Hip Room: 58 in. Front Leg Room: 41.1 in. Rear Leg Room: 38.6 in. Luggage Capacity: 17.9 cu. ft. Maximum Cargo Capacity: 104 cu. ft. Maximum Seating: 8 Performance Data Performance Base Number of Cylinders: 8 Base Engine Size: 5.4 liters Base Engine Type: V8 Horsepower: 300 hp Max Horsepower: 5000 rpm Torque: 355 ft-lbs. Max Torque: 2750 rpm Maximum Payload: 1479 lbs. Maximum Towing Capacity: 8600 lbs. Drive Type: RWD Turning Circle: 40.4 ft. Fuel Data Fuel Fuel Tank Capacity: 28 gal. EPA Mileage Estimates: (City/Highway) Automatic: : 12 mpg / 17 mpg Range in Miles: (City/Highway) Automatic: 336 mi. / 476 mi.
__________________
bakerliz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2008, 08:40 PM   #4
Moderator Emeritus
 
overlander64's Avatar
 
1964 26' Overlander
1978 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre
Anna , Illinois
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 5,396
Images: 183
Send a message via Yahoo to overlander64
TV for 60s Overlander

Greetings Liz!

This is one of those gray areas where there is some difference of opinion. Technically the Tahoe/Yukon as well as the Expedition/Navigator are capable of handling the weight of an Overlander, but the question becomes one of how well the combination will react to weather conditions -- gusty sidewinds, passing semis, and sudden unexpected gusts of wind typical of some valleys.

I know that there is a calculator formula discussed in a thread here on the Forums that addresses the ratio between tow vehicle wheelbase and trailer length, but I am not certain its precise operation. My guideline has always been to take the usual gross loaded weight of my coach and multiply that by a factor of 120% to arrive at my minimum trailer tow rating (6,100 * 120% = 7,320 pounds minimum). My current primary tow vehicle, the '99 K2500 Suburban has a trailer tow rating of 10,000 pounds -- I went overboard partly because I like the pulling power of the old-fashioned big block V8 -- it has proven a quite reliable tow vehicle as it now has in excess of 197,000 miles on the odometer. My Cadillac has a trailer tow rating of 6,000 pounds, but due to its hefty big block, has had little problem handling the trailer -- the car by itself weighs nearly as much as the loaded trailer.

My suggestion would be consider the trailer towing capacity you need. Most Overlanders built between 1960 and 1970 will have typical loaded gross weight of between 5,000 pounds (very earyl 1960s) and 6,500 pounds later 1960s through most of the 1970s. Since the Overlander was most often chosen by people towing with large family station wagons or large family sedans the emphasis was on keeping the gross weight within the trailer towing guidelines of those vehicles -- often 6,000 to 7,000 pounds maximum.

Once you have targeted the minimum trailer towing capacity that you want to consider, I would suggest test driving each vehicle that is of interest. You may find that one will stand out as a stellar performer above all others that you try. I know that once I drove a Suburban, I knew it was the only long-term tow vehicle that I wanted to consider.

With the '64 to '68 Overlander, you would likely be safe to estimate a loaded gross weight of close to 6,000 pounds if not a bit more. Tongue weight will likely be around 700 to 750 pounds. For me, the Overlander is more than I would want to tow with the Tahoe/Yukon, but that is more via my preference for the big block V8 rather than capability of the Tahoe/Yukon.

Good luck with your deliberations!

Kevin
__________________
Kevin D. Allen
WBCCI (Lifetime Member)/VAC/Free Wheelers #6359
AIR #827
1964 Overlander International/1999 GMC K2500 Suburban (7400 VORTEC/4.11 Differentials)
1978 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre/1975 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible (8.2 Liter V8/2.70 Final Drive)
overlander64 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2008, 09:33 PM   #5
1 Rivet Member
 
Currently Looking...
Raleigh , North Carolina
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 19
Thanks Again and Again. No more questions!

Hey Kevin,

Thanks for the explanation. I have read many, many threads, then I think I have a good TV in mind, then something in the equation changes, and I forget why I decided on a particular TV...

One of these days I'm going to post that I HAVE my TV and my AS. I really hope that day comes soon!

I think I'm getting closer, but a few factors beyond my control need to come through...

the waiting is the hardest part...

With trailers full of gratitude for your patient answers,

Liz :-)
__________________
bakerliz is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
how much were Airstreams in the '60s evelitalian Trailer Values 6 01-30-2008 06:23 PM
60s Bambi refrigerator found scottanlily Refrigerators 7 10-19-2007 02:31 AM
Parts--early 60s Overlander Zeppelinium Ribs, Skins & Rivets 4 03-22-2006 12:46 PM
What type of glass should be used on a 60s AS windows? Andy R Windows & Screens 1 06-19-2002 10:23 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:44 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.