Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-21-2015, 09:36 PM   #29
Rivet Master
 
chaseav's Avatar
 
2015 25' FB International
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 513
RareStream mentions visiting the Chrysler dealership... maybe the Dodge products operate at lower max temps. Or maybe the temps are taken at different points. Trying to find a way we can all be correct. I did get a chuckle from this, "besides my personal experience, it's all over the Internet." Because if it's on the Internet, it must be true right?!? I've been on a lot of the blogs too trying to find out the info and it does sound like if it were to be put to a vote, most seem to say 250-270 is "about at hot as you should go" territory at least in a GM product.

Knowing the little I do about metallurgy, I'd find it very hard to believe that the life of components of a transmission would even be mildly affected by 200 degrees and even 300 degrees if not for prolonged or frequent occurrence.
__________________

__________________
chaseav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015, 06:17 PM   #30
3 Rivet Member
 
Seattle , USA
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by ROBERT CROSS View Post
...."Or, you can go ahead and believe that 270 degrees is safe for a modern electronic automatic transmission...once that point is hit, damage is DONE."

Thank you, I will.
As stated, 270 is a safe LIMIT.

FWIW...if your transmission is empty, don't depend on the gauge, the reading is not accurate under those circumstances and it's very difficult to toe.


Boob
No one stated ANYTHING regarding a situation where a "transmission is empty." Transmission fluid is not the same thing as engine coolant. Competent reading comprehension would be helpful here.

Also, the correct word to be used is "tow" and not "toe" as in "towing" a trailer. However, the distance a transmission can actually do that will be severely decreased by letting the tranny temperature ever hit 270 degrees (lol lol lol). A competent tow vehicle would be a better investment for adequate towing; i.e., one that can tow a trailer without overheating the transmission.

But, it's always amusing seeing someone pulled over on the side of the road trying to tow a big load up a hill because they didn't monitor their temperatures adequately until an alarm went off on the dash...that needle touching the red surely couldn't be anything to worry about pulling up that mountain. Nosireebob...



__________________

__________________
RareStream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015, 06:26 PM   #31
3 Rivet Member
 
Seattle , USA
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by chaseav View Post
I did get a chuckle from this, "besides my personal experience, it's all over the Internet." Because if it's on the Internet, it must be true right?!?
No one said that. Try paying attention. The internet is a vast resource; you have to have the competency to filter out improper information. As such, "safe" automatic transmission temperatures are easily researched, as are the effects of heat on different transmission fluids. And yes, the internet is a valuable resource for doing such. It's actually not rocket science. Excess heat=bad, no matter how you try to argue the fact.


Quote:
Originally Posted by chaseav View Post
Knowing the little I do about metallurgy, I'd find it very hard to believe that the life of components of a transmission would even be mildly affected by 200 degrees and even 300 degrees if not for prolonged or frequent occurrence.
I agree with your first point above. You apparently know little about metallurgy as you stated. If you think the components of a transmission are only made of metal, you are sadly mistaken and grossly misinformed. The damage is done to modules, seals, clutches, breakdown of fluid, etc...as well as "metallurgy" as you stated. Before you try to give others improper information regarding what's a safe temperature range for an automatic transmission to operate in, you should really have some sort of clue as to how an automatic transmission works and the parts contained therein. It's not just a mystery pump full of nothing but metal.

Regarding what you stated regarding "if it's on the internet it must be true," you have definitely proven your point that that is NOT the case.

__________________
RareStream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015, 06:38 PM   #32
CLOUDSPLITTER "Tahawas"
 
ROBERT CROSS's Avatar

 
2003 25' Classic
Zanadude Nebula , WNY
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 11,153
Images: 1
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by RareStream View Post
No one stated ANYTHING regarding a situation where a "transmission is empty." Transmission fluid is not the same thing as engine coolant. Competent reading comprehension would be helpful here.

Also, the correct word to be used is "tow" and not "toe" as in "towing" a trailer. However, the distance a transmission can actually do that will be severely decreased by letting the tranny temperature ever hit 270 degrees (lol lol lol). A competent tow vehicle would be a better investment for adequate towing; i.e., one that can tow a trailer without overheating the transmission.

But, it's always amusing seeing someone pulled over on the side of the road trying to tow a big load up a hill because they didn't monitor their temperatures adequately until an alarm went off on the dash...that needle touching the red surely couldn't be anything to worry about pulling up that mountain. Nosireebob...

RS,

Reading comprehension...I'll give you reading comprehension.
What I if told you... I don't understand?
What I if told you….you can't read.


Your taking this way too seriously.
There is a definite banal lack of appreciation for the subtleties of the absurd around here lately.

And bie the way... I'll toe if I want too.

Bob
__________________
ROBERT CROSS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015, 06:52 PM   #33
4 Rivet Member
 
1994 34' Excella
Warren , Manitoba
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 346
This is getting almost as much fun as "The Hitch Wars"!!! I wonder if the type of hitch on the toe vehicle has any input into the tranny temperature??? LOL
__________________
WBCCI #7394
2002 Chev 2500 HD Duramax
1976 31' Gone but fondly remembered
CBWELL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015, 06:59 PM   #34
Rivet Master
 
SteveSueMac's Avatar

 
2012 27' Flying Cloud
W , New England
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 5,410
FYI - ProPridersen hitches keep your toe vehikle's tranny cool, work with under inflated tires, and make your CureEgg coffee taste better. They can balance your Centramatics offset on your axels and cure diseases from time travel in many countries. I know this from personal experience and countless stories I've read on the interwebs. So...there's that.

😃😁😙

C'mon people now - smile on your brother - everybody get together- time to love one another right now....
__________________
SteveSueMac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015, 09:51 PM   #35
Rivet Master
 
chaseav's Avatar
 
2015 25' FB International
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 513
I'll just recap: As the OP I was reaching out to others ON THE INTERNET about what first hand experience they might have towing their Airstream. The source of my information that I ended up posting was actually from the manufacturer of the vehicle. General Freaking Motors himself! I couldn't imagine a more definitive source... but anecdotes on the net... meh why not.

Robert Cross showed a picture of his temp gauge clearly showing a red arc and cited his experience (the aforementioned first hand experience I was seeking).

Others referenced their experience and one referenced a very insightful thread from a tech at Allison who did all the testing for a very long time on these transmissions who may or may not swear on a Bible that 325 was hot but not damaging.

Everyone was in general agreement that temps of 250+ would not do lasting damage to your (General Motors) transmission.

RareStream cites first hand but unrelated experience (and that of the Internets); the toasting of an engine and heat transfer damage to his transmission, then it fails after being given a clean bill of health by an expert and suggests 200 degrees is max.

It's too bad there isn't a way we could vote on their rather than having to use words to convey our thoughts. Cheers and good evening Gents.
__________________
chaseav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2015, 11:49 PM   #36
3 Rivet Member
 
Seattle , USA
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 199
I think you should run your transmission at near 250+ on all climbs pulling your trailer for the next several thousand miles and report back to us with your results. With pictures...that makes it more fun!



(btw tranny temp of 325 "not damaging" heeheheeeheeheeehehheheeeheeeeehee)
__________________
RareStream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2015, 01:01 AM   #37
jcl
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,048
Quote:
Originally Posted by RareStream View Post
(btw tranny temp of 325 "not damaging" heeheheeeheeheeehehheheeeheeeeehee)
If you take a look at the provided link, the guy who wrote the fluid spec gives some good insight. He was talking about the transmission there, not the fluid. He recommended you could run a modern synthetic transmission fluid all day long at 250F, at least in the GM transmissions he was involved in designing fluids for.
__________________
jcl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2015, 01:10 AM   #38
jcl
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,048
Quote:
Originally Posted by RareStream View Post
The internet is a vast resource; you have to have the competency to filter out improper information. As such, "safe" automatic transmission temperatures are easily researched, as are the effects of heat on different transmission fluids.
I have seen that chart of transmission life expectancy before, and in fact saw it many years ago. So I looked back to see what it actually referred to, the original source not having been provided.

The accompanying text states that it is for non synthetic ATF, and that the numbers would be different for synthetics. And it doesn't appear to have come from a transmission fluid supplier, but rather a vendor of aftermarket transmission coolers. Perhaps they have a vested interest?

Since Dexron III is no longer available and has been replaced by Dexron VI, which is fully synthetic, do you have a chart for a modern transmission fluid, whether Dexron VI or a ZF Lifeguard 6 or 8?

Jeff
__________________
jcl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2015, 01:52 AM   #39
3 Rivet Member
 
Seattle , USA
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 199
It's not just the transmission fluid that breaks down with heat, but the seals, modules, clutches, and gaskets.

Add to that excessive heat (325 degrees lol) the stress of pulling 8000lbs of trailer and the torque required to do that, and you're just begging for Good Sam to tow you to the nearest rip-off transmission shop in the middle of nowhere.

NO matter what anyone may try to use to contradict the obvious, excess heat WILL kill any automatic transmission regardless of how advanced the lubricant is.

Just has been true for the last 70 years of trailer towing, HEAT = BAD.
__________________
RareStream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2015, 02:08 AM   #40
jcl
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Vancouver , British Columbia
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 1,048
Quote:
Originally Posted by RareStream View Post
NO matter what anyone may try to use to contradict the obvious, excess heat WILL kill any automatic transmission regardless of how advanced the lubricant is.

Just has been true for the last 70 years of trailer towing, HEAT = BAD.
I don't think anybody has claimed otherwise. Excessive heat is bad. The discussion is around what defines excessive. Claiming that it is the same temperature as it was 70 years ago seems a stretch.

You got burned because of a bad repair. When they fixed the engine overheat, they should have changed the transmission fluid. Because they didn't, you failed a transmission three weeks later. If you had an electronically controlled transmission, like we have today, that wouldn't have happened because the transmission would rely on a dedicated fluid temperature sensor, and the fault would have been logged. And we know where the manufacturers set those alarms, whatever duty the transmission is under.
__________________
jcl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2015, 02:54 AM   #41
3 Rivet Member
 
Seattle , USA
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcl View Post
I don't think anybody has claimed otherwise. Excessive heat is bad. The discussion is around what defines excessive. Claiming that it is the same temperature as it was 70 years ago seems a stretch.
No one claimed that excessive heat "is the same temperature as it was 70 years ago." Please try to pay attention to context and what the actual text states.

It still stands however that anyone who is ignorant enough to pull a trailer "all day long" at 250 degree (lol) transmission temps is asking for exactly what they will get.

Of course, a competent tow vehicle wouldn't run at such temps...but that's for another discussion.
__________________

__________________
RareStream is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Running Pressures and Temperatures Al and Missy Tires 5 05-28-2014 03:00 PM
Temperatures and Sealants Roadrunner Leaks - Weatherstrips, Gaskets, Caulks & Sealants 1 10-18-2009 08:05 AM
Temperatures of wheels Chipleyboy Wheels, Hubs & Bearings 1 01-25-2009 04:24 PM
Operating Temperatures guy99 Mechanics Corner - Engines, Transmission & More... 34 09-04-2004 03:25 PM
Refrigerator temperatures-time davidz71 Refrigerators 7 07-02-2002 02:56 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.