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Old 03-22-2016, 04:48 PM   #743
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Originally Posted by KJRitchie View Post
Did you keep the rear brakes stock?

Kelvin
They got replaced with the above. The package was for all 4 wheels. As for that being stock. Yeah.. same calipers... etc
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Old 03-22-2016, 05:30 PM   #744
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Have you ever weighed your Tundra with your trailer. I know you have a double cab with 4x4, camper shell. My Tundra had a labeled load of 1465lbs. Your Airstream probably has 400lbs less tongue weight than my Classic 25fb. Anyone wondering how the Tundra works for full timing only has to follow your travels.

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Old 03-22-2016, 06:00 PM   #745
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My rig is 14,400# with 8,800# on the trailer axles.

So 6,400 truck, cargo, fuel, occupants and trailer tongue-

No-
That math is incorrect-
5,600 truck, fuel, cargo, occupants, trailer tongue-
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Old 03-22-2016, 06:35 PM   #746
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I didn't have pulsating until I was close to 70,000 miles. If you are wearing rotors and pads well before that, you are either riding the brakes, not downshifting on downgrades, have defective OEM equipment, or are frequently overheating the rotors with really bad driving. The latter can be caused by panic stops and somewhat ironically, almost panic stops is how you solve it. But do not press so hard the ABS kicks in. As you heat up the gunk on the rotors, the hard (not total panic) braking wipes it off. There are not a lot of mountains in Miss., but you can get gunked up traveling to mountains or with panic stops.

I think in years and many miles of towing, I have had two panic stops. One was because I wasn't paying attention—instead of looking at the truck in front of me, I was trying to see around it in stop and go traffic in Pa. The go part got up to about 40, then abruptly stopped. When I looked back at that big rear end of the truck's trailer, I tried to press the brakes into the floor and slowly watched the trailer come closer and closer. I stopped about 3 feet behind it. I didn't have any pulsating after that and drove for years until it started. The second time was last year. I can't remember anything about it.

It is easy to check pads and rotors. Pull the wheels (you should rotate them from time to time anyway). See how much pad is left. A new pad has at least 1/4" of pad before you get to the steel backing. You can see both pads with the wheel off. The outside of the rotor can be seen through the wheel and even more easily when the wheel is off. The inside rotor can be sampled a bit visually and you can kind feel part of it with a finger between the rotor and the backing plate. No touching until brakes cool off. Hot brakes can be 200˚.

If you replace the rear brakes, you have to deal with the small drum that contains the emergency brake. I have heard that is quite a pain to do and I was glad to have someone else fix it. He replaced the rear rotor and pads, probably adjusted the emergency brake (seems a bit firmer, but it has never been all that great) and bled all four wheels and the ABS system in three hours.

As for NAPA brakes, the first time front rotors were replaced, they were NAPA and those are the ones that didn't last much more than 30,000 miles. But, the problem seems to have been a caliper piston sticking. You can clean the pistons instead of buying a rebuilt unit. Brakes are not something I wanted to screw up, so I got rebuilt ones. Saves time too. The new front brakes are Powerstop. Not the most expensive version, but the second most expensive. They are grooved and drilled to dissipate heat a little better. The calipers are painted red and look cool. I found an online sale through Auto Zone and they didn't even want the cores. Nonetheless, it was cheaper than anywhere else that week. The new rear ones are NAPA. I have generally had good experiences with NAPA except for Belkin electrical parts.

Despite the gunk problem, rotors can warp. But it appears hungry mechanics have been selling people rotors based on misinformation for years. Whether they knew or not that it could simply be gunk, I can't say. But if the method to break in new pads is the same as getting rid of the gunk, it seems they should know.

Barb drove the truck for the first time since they were fixed. It passed the toughest grader.

Everything else works like new, but I'm thinking it may be time to replace the serpentine belt. Maybe I can screw that up. I suppose I could inspect it. These belts seem to wear much less than the old V belts.

Gene
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Old 03-22-2016, 07:54 PM   #747
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Gene thanks for the brake ideas

I have owned an 07 Tundra, no brake problems and I traded it with 120,000 miles and still had 30% of the original pads left. Currently have 75,000 miles on my 12 Tundra. Have been hind occasional pulsating. Of the brakes and will try your suggestion. I have also had a couple ocassions of major vibration. I looked on a Toyota website, and found there are others out there with severe brake vibration. Unfortunately it is intermittently and not easily diagnosed. As for the trucks themselves, many of the changes to the Tundra have omitted almost 30 items from the 07-13 models as compared to the 14 and newer models--that is if yours is the SR5 model. You'll. Know right from the beginning when you try to get in without the driver assist handle--it goes downhill from there. My 12 feels like it struggles to pull my AS 25', unfortunately I think we are going for a different (probably less reliable) brand next time that will address some towing and lack of content that Toyota seems to be embracing. With its current offerings.
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Old 03-22-2016, 08:59 PM   #748
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene View Post
I didn't have pulsating until I was close to 70,000 miles. If you are wearing rotors and pads well before that, you are either riding the brakes, not downshifting on downgrades, have defective OEM equipment, or are frequently overheating the rotors with really bad driving. The latter can be caused by panic stops and somewhat ironically, almost panic stops is how you solve it. But do not press so hard the ABS kicks in. As you heat up the gunk on the rotors, the hard (not total panic) braking wipes it off. There are not a lot of mountains in Miss., but you can get gunked up traveling to mountains or with panic stops.

I think in years and many miles of towing, I have had two panic stops. One was because I wasn't paying attention—instead of looking at the truck in front of me, I was trying to see around it in stop and go traffic in Pa. The go part got up to about 40, then abruptly stopped. When I looked back at that big rear end of the truck's trailer, I tried to press the brakes into the floor and slowly watched the trailer come closer and closer. I stopped about 3 feet behind it. I didn't have any pulsating after that and drove for years until it started. The second time was last year. I can't remember anything about it.

It is easy to check pads and rotors. Pull the wheels (you should rotate them from time to time anyway). See how much pad is left. A new pad has at least 1/4" of pad before you get to the steel backing. You can see both pads with the wheel off. The outside of the rotor can be seen through the wheel and even more easily when the wheel is off. The inside rotor can be sampled a bit visually and you can kind feel part of it with a finger between the rotor and the backing plate. No touching until brakes cool off. Hot brakes can be 200˚.

If you replace the rear brakes, you have to deal with the small drum that contains the emergency brake. I have heard that is quite a pain to do and I was glad to have someone else fix it. He replaced the rear rotor and pads, probably adjusted the emergency brake (seems a bit firmer, but it has never been all that great) and bled all four wheels and the ABS system in three hours.

As for NAPA brakes, the first time front rotors were replaced, they were NAPA and those are the ones that didn't last much more than 30,000 miles. But, the problem seems to have been a caliper piston sticking. You can clean the pistons instead of buying a rebuilt unit. Brakes are not something I wanted to screw up, so I got rebuilt ones. Saves time too. The new front brakes are Powerstop. Not the most expensive version, but the second most expensive. They are grooved and drilled to dissipate heat a little better. The calipers are painted red and look cool. I found an online sale through Auto Zone and they didn't even want the cores. Nonetheless, it was cheaper than anywhere else that week. The new rear ones are NAPA. I have generally had good experiences with NAPA except for Belkin electrical parts.

Despite the gunk problem, rotors can warp. But it appears hungry mechanics have been selling people rotors based on misinformation for years. Whether they knew or not that it could simply be gunk, I can't say. But if the method to break in new pads is the same as getting rid of the gunk, it seems they should know.

Barb drove the truck for the first time since they were fixed. It passed the toughest grader.

Everything else works like new, but I'm thinking it may be time to replace the serpentine belt. Maybe I can screw that up. I suppose I could inspect it. These belts seem to wear much less than the old V belts.

Gene

Panic stops are people pulling out in front of me or cutting me off-
No control over that-
I do what I gotta do to prevent from killing them...
I replaced the serpentine belt.
It is an easy DIY repair.
Brakes are all original.
The truck has towed almost all the miles that are on it.
Even with trailer brakes properly adjusted and everything in top notch mechanical condition 14,400# doesn't stop on a dime.


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Old 03-22-2016, 09:13 PM   #749
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Even with the disc brakes on the Classic, stopping the rig at 19,200 pounds is not an instantaneous event nor a short distance. However, it is much shorter than with the original drum style trailer brakes.
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Old 03-22-2016, 09:26 PM   #750
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So...
My 2013 Classic can be upgraded to disc brakes?


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Old 03-22-2016, 09:39 PM   #751
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m.hony View Post
Even with trailer brakes properly adjusted and everything in top notch mechanical condition 14,400# doesn't stop on a dime.
Quote:
Originally Posted by switz View Post
Even with the disc brakes on the Classic, stopping the rig at 19,200 pounds is not an instantaneous event nor a short distance.
Thank you for sharing this info.
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Old 03-31-2016, 12:12 PM   #752
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m.',

I believe any trailer can be upgraded to disc brakes, but you'd have to check carefully. You will stop much better and pay a healthy chunk of money to do so. I prefer to drive leaving a lot of space between me and the vehicles in front, though I am not perfect at that. In heavy traffic, driving with traffic flow (usually the safest thing) means any space in front of you will be soon filled with an impatient driver. Maybe they deserve to be maimed or worse, but you also are inconvenienced and have to fill out paperwork, have your truck repaired and maybe worse. It is assumed that when you rear end someone, it is your fault, even though you keep trying to leave a safe space in front of you.

cando,

I have noticed Toyota has been doing two things—eliminating standard features on the SR5 (do they still call it that?) and adding more premium trim levels, just like US companies. I guess that costs less than a major redesign of the truck. The most egregious example is removing tow mirrors from the "tow package". People don't expect that and then find out they have to pay a silly price for tow mirrors from the dealer. Aftermarket tow mirrors for the Tundra are available at a better price.

Toyota has been focusing on making exciting looking cars since a new boss from the Toyoda family has taken over (witness the amazingly ugly grille on the 2016 Lexus as an example of what exciting may mean). I'd rather they made the vehicles more reliable and more fuel efficient. If the time comes to buy another tow vehicle, I may look at other brands too.

Sometimes I think Toyota is following the GM example—long ago GM made the best production cars in the world, rightfully sold more cars than anyone else, and then rested on its laurels for decades while quality went in the toilet. Bankruptcy was next. They seem to be making much better vehicles lately, but still haven't caught up. I don't know if Ford has gotten over its penchant for releasing vehicles before they are fully tested. Dodge or Ram or whatever they called Fiats now are still at the bottom of the quality/reliability barrel. I haven't seen the Nissan or Honda pickups are more than vanity pickups. If Chevies are as reliable as Tundras, I'd look at them. But for now, the Tundra is fine.

Gene
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Old 03-31-2016, 03:07 PM   #753
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I bought my '08 Tundra 3+ years ago. It had 9K miles on it. This truck is equipped with the tow package but did not come with tow mirrors.
I think the mirrors were an option from the get go.
I installed OEM tow mirrors in less than 90 minutes.
No special tools required.
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Old 03-31-2016, 03:26 PM   #754
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I prefer to drive leaving a lot of space between me and the vehicles in front, though I am not perfect at that. In heavy traffic, driving with traffic flow (usually the safest thing) means any space in front of you will be soon filled with an impatient driver. Maybe they deserve to be maimed or worse, but you also are inconvenienced and have to fill out paperwork, have your truck repaired and maybe worse. It is assumed that when you rear end someone, it is your fault, even though you keep trying to leave a safe space in front of you.

I don't have problem keeping space in front of my vehicle.
I drive the posted speed limit up to 65 mph- never over 65 mph-
2 reasons:
1. safety- more time to react/correct
2. fuel economy
4 seconds following up to 30 mph-
6 seconds following distance (or more) above 30 mph-
I time lights-
If it is red there is no need to race up to it, slam on brakes, and then zoom away when it is green.
I begin braking even if the red light is 300 yards away-
It may go green before I get there and I will never have to stop.
This driving style has not changed/will not change due to new 16" wheels and tires on the camper.
This driving style would not change even if I had a 3/4 ton or 1 ton.
I drive 3/4 ton and 1 ton GM Duramax/Allison trucks every day at work.
I still prefer my Tundra.
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Old 03-31-2016, 03:28 PM   #755
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Timing red lights, slowing gently way ahead of time, and taking off gently save your brake pads/rotors, suspension, engine, and transmission and saves fuel, not to mention the safety aspects-
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Old 04-03-2016, 01:19 PM   #756
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Originally Posted by TG Twinkie View Post
I bought my '08 Tundra 3+ years ago. It had 9K miles on it. This truck is equipped with the tow package but did not come with tow mirrors.
I think the mirrors were an option from the get go.
True, mirrors were a separate item. I looked up my invoice (the one the dealer doesn't want you to see, but I got it anyway) and the info from Kelly's Blue Book and Edmunds. There was no "tow package" per se. There was a "cold kit" which included heavy duty battery and starter; a "TRD off road package" which included Bilstein shocks and off road suspension. These might be considered part of a "tow package". Tow mirrors were another option ($90 list, $72 dealer price).

Toyotas rarely come stripped down to the basic vehicle. They are usually loaded with options and ours had all three options which include all the items associated with a generic tow package. A couple of years after we bought our truck in September '07, there were complaints on the Forum that people bought Tundras with a "tow package" and didn't get tow mirrors. They were quoted prices far in excess of $90 for the mirrors. They went to the aftermarket in some cases. I don't know if Toyota had a "tow package" after '07, but I suspect they kept the same options for a while anyway. Toyota doesn't change its policies very fast.

The difference in prices after the truck was purchased may be because removing the standard mirrors from an unsold truck on the lot means you could sell them as new, but if the vehicle was purchased and driven 10', the standard mirrors are "used" and the dealer does not want them.

By the time complaints started getting posted on the Forum about Tundras with a "tow package" without tow mirrors, I had forgotten that there was no specific tow package in 2007. I suspect some of the Tundra purchasers had told the dealer they were going to use it to tow something, they had been told it came with a "tow package" even though there was no such thing, but there were items associated with a tow package on the particular vehicle. The buyers didn't check carefully enough to see there were no tow mirrors despite other tow things being included. I think, but am unsure, all vehicles (or all V8's) came with the "tow/haul" switch and that may lead buyers to assume there is a full "tow package".

Once again, it proves you have to be sharp when buying a motor vehicle. All the options and dealer silliness will make many people crazy and they will miss something. Bring a lawyer and an accountant with you.

Gene
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