Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-30-2010, 03:04 PM   #225
Rivet Master
 
Globie64's Avatar
 
1964 19' Globetrotter
The Sea Ranch , California
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,377
Images: 18
Blog Entries: 3
Thanks Geen- we had to replace the tires at 12k, that is, twelve thousand miles. This is used for constant speed 45-50 mph on decent secondary highways only. In that time, we didn't tow. Now we have a set of Continentals that have improved ride and handling, but at 24k, they're more than half gone. The shake is a flex in the frame, the body and bed shake at different rates. Its something that our old Ranger did. I don't know if there is any kind of reinforcement added for TRD versions, or more likely, they beef up the front subframe for the V8.
__________________

__________________
Wherever you go, there you are
Globie64 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2010, 03:10 PM   #226
Rivet Master
 
2005 19' Safari
GLENDALE , AZ
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,441
Our 2008 CrewMax rides like a limo compared to our old 1978, 3/4 ton Chevy pickup. We have fond memories of towing with Hal, but some nightmares, too. I don't think there is anyway I could get my wife to go back to anything that handled and rode like Hal, although it was pretty typical for most HD pickups. The long wheelbase on that old Chevy crewcab was great for towing, but boy was it hard to find a place wide enough to turn around, with or without our Airstream in tow.

As for tire wear, we have 33,000 on our OEM Rugged Trails, and they'll probably go another 10-20,000 miles. I think this may be because we keep them pumped up to 44 psi all the time. They are also wearing evenly, a surprise; however, I can't wait for them to wear out, so I can replace them with Michelins.

We have the TRD, too. I think the only difference was that this option added Bilstein shocks, and added the tow package standard (hitch receiver and wiring, HD radiator, transmission cooler, battery and a couple of other minor things).

There's lots of discussion threads on "bed bounce" on www.tundratalk.net, but I think it's the California (and other states) roads. Those old concrete stretches that build up bouncing harmonics at specific speeds, usually right at cruising speed.
__________________

__________________
Phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2010, 06:37 PM   #227
2 Rivet Member
 
2007 27' Safari FB SE
redmond , Oregon
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 68
well I "pulled the trigger" no reference to violence here! Picked up a 2010 crewmax tundra. After reading the many pros and cons and glowing praise from tundra owners it seemed like the way to go. Only toww with wife and she only weighs 120 so won't stress the total load . We replaced a land cruiser and will only load up the tundra hauling folk with us non towing. feel pretty good about the deal.
__________________
rashton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2010, 11:36 PM   #228
New Member
 
2000 25' Safari
Santa Fe , New Mexico
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1
Rashton, I hope you are as happy with your Tundra as I am with mine. I have a 2008 with the towing package and without the TRD stuff, which IMHO makes for a rough ride. (I was lucky to find it, but I had checked the dealer stock on line before I went and knew they had one.) I pull a 25' Safari at about 6000lb and can go down the interstate at 75 easily if I want to burn the gasoline to do it. I would not hesitate to pull anything up to the 10,000 lb limit, balancing the load to keep the tongue weight within specs.

The government just got more strict about how towing capacity is rated, and lots of trucks were downgraded (especially the smaller ones), but the Tundra stayed right where it was. I think that speaks well for it as a tow vehicle design. Also, on the mechanical geek end of things, the brakes, drivetrain and rear end are massive. The rear end is 10" and has more like a 3/4 ton or even 1 ton ring gear (some dealers have a little showroom display featuring this stuff). The big Nissan, for example, has a 7"+/- rear end in it, not remotely in the same league, even though the engine is about the same size.

With regard to tires, the Michelins that came with mine still have most of the tread on them after 19,000 miles, but I only tow on vacation. I have also had good luck with Yokohamas on some other trucks.

Cheers!
__________________
bdbender is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2010, 01:06 AM   #229
2 Rivet Member
 
2007 27' Safari FB SE
redmond , Oregon
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 68
the tundra was being used by the dealership owner and he put 295/70/17 tires on it. they are toyos which I have used in the past so we'll see how they last. We are leaving on a 2+week trip to yellowstone area next week so will test this badboy out!
__________________
rashton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2010, 05:34 AM   #230
4 Rivet Member
 
macofpei's Avatar
 
2003 30' Classic
Stratford , Prince Edward Island
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 259
Images: 1
Send a message via Yahoo to macofpei Send a message via Skype™ to macofpei
Welcome to the CrewMax family. I have a 2010 loaded and I have towed my 32' Excella and also my 30' Classic without any problems what so ever. You will find that you will hardly know the trailer is behind you (except for wider turns and gas consumption). I put my Black Beauty in D and let the computer deal with the shifting, etc.
__________________
Mac from PEI
Prince Edward Island
Canada
WBCCI #4782
"Southern Belle"
'03 Classic 30'
'10 Toyota CrewMax
macofpei is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2010, 09:41 AM   #231
2 Rivet Member
 
2008 27' International CCD FB
Minnetonka , Minnesota
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 76
Images: 10
We're on our second year with a 2008 Tundra crewmax limited pulling a 2008 27FB. So far no problems whatsoever. Many times I almost forget its back there on the right kind of roads. We use the equalizer. The ride has been suv like which was the reason we got the tundra over the Ford. Were on 20"wheels and Ive read wed probably do better with a smaller wheel but will think about that when its time to get new rubber.
__________________
Randjg1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2010, 01:43 PM   #232
2 Rivet Member
 
2007 27' Safari FB SE
redmond , Oregon
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 68
I have an equalizer hitch with a 2 inch drop what are you using drop wise with the tundra?
__________________
rashton is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2010, 08:40 PM   #233
SRW
TEXAS66
 
SRW's Avatar
 
Georgetown , Texas
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 291
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerryC View Post
I just bought a 2010 Tundra Double Cab w/the 5.7, 2 W/D.

Towed yesterday my 2010, 20ft. Flying Cloud. The ride is pretty stiff on concrete roads (California freeways ugh!) The sales people talked me into the TRD package (a truck they had on the lot, better price).

The TRD comes with the off-road-tuned suspension, tow package (increases Max Tow capacity to 10,600 lbs. 1,745 payload capacity as opposed to Max Tow capacity of 8,600 lbs., 1,745 payload). Maybe I didn't need the TRD kit. It sure rides stiff, you know you're in a big truck! I don't know if I like it yet or not!

Keep that in mind if you're looking for a new Tundra!

Side note: This truck ride is stiff when not towing as well. I rode in a friends 2010 D/C, 4.6 4-W/D, before I bought this one and I liked the ride. Hoping the TRD will soften up a bit, I've only got 500 miles on mine.

TerryC.
I am sure you know that the towing capacities of most trucks has been recently downrated to meet new international standards.

For example, the 4x2, 2007 CrewMax Limited (the model I own) was down rated from 10,000 lb. to 9300, and a 4x2 Dbl. Cab 5.7 ltr. is now 10,100 compared to the 10,600 lb. it was rated previously.
__________________
TEXAS66
SRW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2010, 10:58 PM   #234
Rivet Master
 
Dave Park's Avatar
 
2005 22' Safari
Hyde Park Place , Ohio
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 972
The year after my F150, they dropped the rating of my tow package from 9,900 to 9,100 lbs. Interestingly, with 600 lb tongue weight, the front axle was only unloaded around 80 lbs, and simply carrying a passenger restored that weight.

I suspect that half of this new industry standard is upselling larger trucks, and the other half is liability avoidance. That said, I would not want to tow without a WD hitch were one was specified, even if only marginally so, because it provides insurance companies with an out, and anyone you injure a valid claim against you.

PS: Toyota Tundras and Titans are awesome.
__________________
TX-16
Dave Park is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2010, 01:06 AM   #235
2 Rivet Member
 
2016 25' Flying Cloud
2010 20' Flying Cloud
Los Gatos , California
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 64
Back in August I was complaining about the jerky ride "Bed Bounce" on my 2010 DoubleCab Tundra 5.7l w/TRD Offroad package. I had 500 miles on the truck then.
In the meantime on the "Tundra Solutions.Com" forum I found a thread on "Bed Bounce". Toyota has finally recognized the jittery ride as a complaint amongst customers. Toyota has a TSB i.e. "Technical Service Bulletin" out to correct the problem "TSB-027-10" which instructs the dealers to replace the rear cab "Isolator Bushings" with different ones. I took my pickup to the dealer and they installed the new bushings. I have to say the ride is greatly improved!
This is one nice aspect of owning a Toyota product, they listen to their customers. My good buddy has a Dodge truck and he complained several times about the "bone jarring ride". He told me the dealer replied "you bought a heavy duty truck didn't you? NoHelp, Thanks Dodge! Now we see the new Dodges are coming out with coil springs as opposed to leafs.
I would urge anyone thinking about buying a Tundra pickup, peruse the Toyota Solutions.com website.
Apart from ride, I now have 5000 miles on the truck, it pulls our 2010-20' Flying Cloud with ease! I tow a 60 mph pretty steady and get 13mpg, Around town and freeway driving 15-17mpg.
Another item, the AS literature states a 640lb tongue weight, I weighed the tongue on a public scale and found I had a 750lb tongue weight with the trailer loaded.

TerryC
__________________
TerryC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2010, 09:41 AM   #236
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,840
Just about only time I have experienced "bed bounce" is in California in places where they have concrete roads. The expansion joints seem to resonate with the Tundra suspension. I have also noticed it on a concrete section of I-70 east of Denver. Fortunately, concrete isn't used much for roads and when it is, the joints aren't usually that bad.

Gene
__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2010, 09:10 PM   #237
Rivet Master
 
2005 19' Safari
GLENDALE , AZ
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,441
Bed bounce isn't really a Tundra problem so much as a roadway problem. Before we got our Tundra in 2008, our Chevy pickup's ride was just as bad on some stretches of I-10 approaching LA. It's a matter of the length between the dips and the wheel base of a vehicle setting up low frequency harmonic vibrations at certain speeds. If you speed up or slow down a little, it's a little less violent. Unfortunately, concrete is very durable, which just means that those roads will be bad for a really long time.

See more discussions on bed bounce on www.tundratalk.net
__________________
Phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-23-2010, 09:31 PM   #238
Rivet Master
 
Dave Park's Avatar
 
2005 22' Safari
Hyde Park Place , Ohio
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 972
If it is a road problem and not a truck problem, all trucks should be similarly affected. They're not.

YouTube - Ford F150 vs Chevy vs Toyota - Bed Bounce

The F150 behaves better because it has a fully boxed frame with hydroformed front rails to form a closed section. Rail cross members use a through-rail weld. The large 'wide footprint' brackets for suspension, body and powertrain and the use of hydraulic engine mounts and the fully welded frame is nine times stiffer in torsion than the Tundra.

There is a kit for the Tundra that largely solves the bed bounce issue, but it doesn't stop the frame twisting longitudinally.

I think the test is very contrived and there are almost no places where real world conditions should create this damage, so I don't see it as a problem for that generation of the Tundra. The next gen Tundra will have a much stiffer frame, and I believe they'll be lengthening the wheelbase by moving the rear axle back another 4 or 5".

The Tundra is an excellent truck for the generation of design tech that it represents.
__________________

__________________
TX-16
Dave Park is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
toyota tundra, tow vehicles


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Toyota Tundra rochar3 Tow Vehicles 140 09-13-2014 09:54 PM
Toyota Highlander as a tow vehicle? hellonewman! Tow Vehicles 6 07-13-2007 08:59 PM
Toyota Sequoia as Tow Vehicle Thegman Tow Vehicles 12 10-13-2006 12:15 PM
New Toyota FJ Cruiser as a tow vehicle? chickin Tow Vehicles 10 10-01-2006 11:15 AM
Old Toyota V6 Pickup as a Tow Vehicle? geokid1 Tow Vehicles 10 04-02-2004 07:44 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.