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Old 11-08-2007, 01:34 PM   #15
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check out toyota.com they have a Diesel Tundra dually coming out!
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Old 11-08-2007, 02:41 PM   #16
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the new land cruiser has the same 5.7L V8 that the new Tundra has. But if i remember correctly without a trailer on the back it only gets like 12 mpg. I may be mistaken, but isn't the LC full time AWD? that sucks the gas.

my tundra isn't bad on gas, 16mpg (quite a bit of city driving). of course keep in mind with the 5.7L V8 and the tow package they put a 4.30 rear end in it.
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Old 11-08-2007, 05:27 PM   #17
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You have to admit- this would look great towing an Airstream. (It's the original Porsche - in aluminum)
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Old 11-10-2007, 10:18 PM   #18
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Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by walter1
I’ve read you guys love your Tundras. I have need for an enclosed midsized 4x4 SUV for double duty with “other interests”.

Has anyone towed with a 2000+ Toyota Sequoia or Land Cruiser? Towing #3500-#4500 1960’s 22’ Safari.

Are Sequoia and/or Land Cruiser built on same chassis/power train as Tundras?
Go to RV Towing Tips - How long?

It porvides good info regards to the relationship of tow vehicle wheel base to trailer length.

I use a 2007 Tundra 5.7L Crew Max to tow a 28 ft. 2008 International,.
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Old 11-13-2010, 02:13 PM   #19
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Here's my two cents. I have a 2002 Toyota Sequoia SR5 2WD. I have pulled a 31' "white box" trailer a few thousand miles. It has a dealer installed Reese hitch rated at 6,500 lbs. I'm not sure exactly the total weight I was towing. I guess around 6,000. It towed pretty well. It didn't have any problems going up steep hills on I-10. When it was flat it would easily tow 65 mph. This was without any load equalizing hitch and no sway control. I only use Michelin tires as I've found all others to be disappointing. The quality of tires on your tow vehicle can affect your towing comfort. As far as MPG goes, make sure you have a credit card with a large limit, because you can expect 7-8 MPG at 65 MPH. Towing an Airstream should be a little better. The bottom line is the Sequoia can tow a 6,500 pound load just fine and dandy.
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Old 11-13-2010, 04:14 PM   #20
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I used to own a 2003 Toyota Landcruiser that I used to tow my 22' International (5600 gvwr). The Landcruiser did fine in the Sierras and on long trips. The LC had a 4.7 liter in it which was smooth but not close to the power of the newer Tundras or LandCruisers. Towing was comfortable and there was a lot of peace of mind on trips and side excursions away from the trailer and the truck was simply bullet proof. I had it to 120k miles or so and nothing ever broke or went wrong. By far the best car I've ever owned. I plan on getting a used one of the newer LandCruiser in the next year or so. They are alot of fun to take off roading when camping in the mountains and desert.
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Old 11-13-2010, 04:49 PM   #21
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So few Landcruisers are sold in the US that it's tough to find a used one. We have a friend who did buy a used one with the 5.7 l. engine. He paid a lot for it. I tell him it's a 4Runner with wood.

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Old 11-21-2010, 10:58 AM   #22
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I just returned from a round trip to Scottsdale for a car show pulling one of my hot rods on a flatbed trailer running 65 to 75 MPH with an '06 GMC Sierra 2500 gas crew cab and my mileage was 12.07 MPG.
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Old 11-21-2010, 12:03 PM   #23
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2008 Tundra 4x4 TRD Double Cab & Land Cruiser

In 2008 we sold our 2006 Tundra 4.7L and 2000 Land Cruiser 4.7L to take advantage of the second year of the 5.7L engines. Although the 2006 Tundra with shell towed our 23 foot Safari with ease, the full size Tundra pulls equally as well and with better mileage per gallon (under much heavier loads). No regrets at all, but the smaller Tundra pulled fine, braking power was fine and the brakes were original when we sold it with 44,000 miles.

The 2008 Tundra has better turning radius than the 2006 and earlier models, larger brakes and the drive train has given me no trouble after 50,000 miles. Why did I go to the 2008 model, you might ask. Braking and stability of the larger vehicle pulling a trailer was my number one concern. The 5.7L engine gets better gasoline mileage than the 4.7L. From threads done in 2008 and 2009 I gave examples...

The 2008 Land Cruiser with the 5.7L engine makes our former 2000 Land Cruiser appear to be a dog and the 2000 made the two 1994 6 cylinder Land Cruisers worse. The transmissions on ALL seems to be unbeatable. The idea was to use the Tundra for Rockdocking off road towing and the Land Cruiser for blacktop travel east. It was hard enough to find a dealer with a silver Land Cruiser, so we are keeping it for the 10 year haul and not tow with it. The Tundra is a much better option for towing since we have plenty of storage in the 6 foot+ bed with shell. The spare tire is a dog that is provided with the new Tundra. Talk the dealer into putting an aluminum wheel and matching tire as a spare. I found that to be a cheap alternative for the MSRP asking price.

I have not owned a Ford or Chevrolet since 1981 and cannot comment on them, but I am sure they are fine vehicles as well. My 1978 4x4 Chevrolet pickup with a 350 cubic inch engine (5.7L +/-) was my last Big Three vehicle and our buying a 1981 Toyota pickup was so positive an experience (about 30% the size of a current Tundra) that I do not need to try another brand. If Toyota sells me a dog, like my 1978 Chevrolet pickup experience, I have no reason to change brands. If so, it would be a Ford F250 4x4.

Keep under a 25 foot AS and the 4.7L Toyota models should be fine. Towing a 25 foot+ AS is getting risky. More for braking power as you would obviously not be concerned about the extra gasoline it would take to get rolling to minimum highway speeds. Brakes and control first. Power second. Drive smart, stay safe and listen to those giving alternative advice on the forum. There is more than one correct answer and they all come with a caveat.

I wanted to add: A friend has a 4.7L Sequoia pulling a 25 foot AS and has complained about it overheating. Engine and/or transmission as well. It could be his driving habits or maybe he overloads the Sequoia. He uses it because of his two large dogs that ride in the storage area and the pickup would be not practical for them.
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Old 11-21-2010, 12:39 PM   #24
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We now have 56,600 miles on our 2007 5.7 liter Tundra. More than 35,000 miles have been towing. It tows very well and fast over any Colorado pass. The coolant and transmission temps hardly ever budge, and when they have increased, it's been by a very small amount. The drive train and suspension have performed very well. I don't think Toyota is making the vehicles they used to, but so far as i can see it's in items like finish, seat comfort, paint and such. A dealer told me the problems they see are with the items made in the US, not Japan. This is distressing news. Changing the oil is a royal pain and even worse if you have the optional decorative extra skid plate.

The 2nd generation Tundras handle much better than the 1st generation. The turning circle is good and smaller than the 1st generation, important when towing forward or back in small areas.

We plan on keeping this Tundra 3 more years for a total of 6. By then I hope gas mileage will be better on full size pickups. An important part of what we select a vehicle for is reliability. We've been loyal to Toyota and will remain so if they are loyal to their customers and continue to make the most reliable vehicles, however it would be nice to buy an American brand. Of course, no brand is entirely American or Japanese. If you look at Consumer Report ratings on reliability, Toyota has slipped over the past several years, but it doesn't appear GM and Ford trucks are as good, yet.

This is an old thread that has been resurrected. The basics are the same. Sequoias are a Tundra with a bigger, heavier body and less payload. The 2nd generation Sequoia came in 2008, the Tundra in 2007. It's a comfy luxury vehicle, but not as suitable as a Tundra for towing medium sized Airstreams. The Land Cruiser seems to be more off-road designed than the Sequoia, but with the Tundra drivetrain. I don't know about the suspension or whether there's a tow package. Land Cruisers sell much better in other parts of the world than the US. I think I read they sell around 2,500/year in the US. You can buy roughly 2 Tundras with the Limited trim for the price of a Land Cruiser.

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Old 11-21-2010, 01:55 PM   #25
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I guess I'm a computer slug couldn"t find the future diesel/dually on toyota.com we have a 2010 tundra crew max and love it . Had a 2001 land cruiser but didn't use it to tow
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Old 11-21-2010, 07:25 PM   #26
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Land Cruiser drive train

The Land Cruiser has its own transmission design, drive train, frame and body. A transmission specialist said if all vehicles had the LC transmission, he would be out of business. You are right, you pay through the nose for a new LC, but it is a 250,000 mile vehicle before you are ready to let it go. The idea of getting two Tundras is not a bad idea, though! The LC sells very quickly when advertised for sale for a premium and it is a vehicle for hauling 7 people around. It rides a little stiff, but probably could use some extra support on the rear axle. Of course, most people buy them to drive around town and would not dare touch a gravel road.

I thought it funny when you mentioned the "decorative aluminum front skid plate" on the Tundra. Our 2008 came with this skid plate, which covers the steel skid plate that is more than adequate. Having the oil changed at the dealership has been about as reasonable as doing it at home, but watching the mechanics piddle around getting that worthless piece of scrap aluminum back on is something to watch.
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Old 11-22-2010, 09:21 AM   #27
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Mechanics hate that decorative skid plate. I always change my own oil, but when I was in Alaska last summer, I had to get it changed. I had it done at a little garage (my experience at the Toyota dealer in Anchorage 8 years before was not positive). It took two mechanics 2:40 to do it. I talked them through the process or it would have been a lot longer. It takes me 3:00 or a bit less. After I returned, I took off that damn skid plate and put it aside and the process is much quicker, but not quick.

Getting the oil filter, not a cartridge type, also is a pain and you're supposed to buy a "special tool", but I figured out a work around. The grease zerks on the front propellor shaft are very hard to get to because they put frame supports right below them.

Years ago one complaint about US vehicles was that no one could fix themselves because the engine compartment was a mass of metal and everything was difficult. Compounding that was the fact they broke a lot. Foreign cars were easier to fix and became more reliable. The Toyotas have become more difficult to service, but are much more reliable than cars and trucks were years ago.

A friend has a Land Cruiser and it's nice, but not $70 or 80,000 worth of nice.

Gene
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Old 11-24-2010, 08:01 PM   #28
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Toyota Land Cruiser- 2008

Our Land Cruiser was $64,000. The only changes you can find are color, and white or black seem to be the ones offered most often. I have to admit that it is not inexpensive, but after 150,000 miles you can sell it for 35% to 40% of what you paid on a quick sale. They do not change the body styles much, so it is the engine that is more important.

My 1985 Land Cruiser, at 186,000 miles developed a engine gasket leak and the head cracked. No warning, but when you see the temperature gauge peaking out, you need to drive home in spurts. Removing the head and taking it to a tractor trailer truck engine repair shop, they ground the crack, put in metal screw plugs and welded it. I took it to an automotive shop and had the valves ground and seated, paid a shop to put it back together... and eventually sold it to buy a 1994 model with the fuel injected straight 6 cylinder engine (about 300 cubic inches- I heard these were a Chevrolet engine style used in the LC's for many years, since the first models).

The later models became less spartan and turned more into a luxury vehicle over time and that is why they seem too pricey today. But I never found myself stranded, or broken down. At 175,000+ miles the front wheel bearings are the first things to go. When you turn tight and hear a "pop" sound up front, get both front wheel bearings replaced.

The best place to find a better price on this pricey vehicle is a smaller town Toyota dealership. Ours came from Clovis, New Mexico... It was the best price we could find.
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