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Old 07-07-2013, 10:57 PM   #71
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I needed to replace the tires on my 2008 Toyota Tundra and I stumbled across this thread; the information provided by Switz and CapriRacer has been particularly helpful. Thanks to the both of you.

I was happy with the original equipment P Michlin tires (P255/70R18) and got 47k miles out of them, so I went ahead and replaced them with LTX (P) 255/70R18 112T tires rated at 2469 lbs. The LTX tires provide more tire load reserve- 2469 lbs vs. 2245 lbs.

I thought about going with a higher rated tire (LT), but felt that I did not need it since I was under the max rear axle rating, not by much though, and did not want to take a chance on affecting the ride, stability or handling of the vehicle.

I will report back on the performance of these tires.

Dan
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Old 07-07-2013, 11:30 PM   #72
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We have a 2008 Tundra CrewMax TRD; and the tires we run are Michelin LTX M/S2 LT, load range E, 275/65x18 (standard for TRD).

In this size, the maximum load spec for the LR-E tire is 3,415 pounds @ 80 psi, while the max load for the "P" tire is 2,601 pounds @ 44 psi.

For the $9 difference in price, the LR-E tire is 8 pounds heavier due to an additional steel radial belt, and it has the Michelin "Green X", low rolling resistance rating.

We run 55/65 psi (F/R) when towing and 55/45 empty. And, while the LR-E LT tire rides a little firmer and less "squishy" than the OEM BFG Rugged Trails (same size) at 44/44 psi, the ride is not harsh or truck-like compared to HAL, our old 1978 Chevy crew cab, 3/4 ton, long bed pickup with 454 V8. However, I should note that HAL's truck-like ride was undoubtedly attributable to the suspension, since it had Michelin LTX M/S LT, LR-E tires on it, too (the previous generation of the tire on our Tundra).

For $9 extra per tire, the extra confidence, safety margin and load capacity (when inflated to 80 psi) is a bargain, without sacrificing ride comfort.

Just another opinion...
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Old 07-08-2013, 10:32 AM   #73
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Phoenix

I considered the LTX M/S2 LT tires also. I guess that I mainly went with the P tires as they were available in the stock size and I have not had any experience with the LTX M/S or S2 tires. I probably would have made the same decision as you had I been in your shoes.

Time will tell for me.

Dan
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Old 07-10-2013, 11:00 AM   #74
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Just put on a set of Toyo's open country II, great reviews.

I'll follow up soon Friday 250 mile trip
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Old 08-03-2013, 10:32 AM   #75
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When you guys refer to your LTX tires in Load range E it confuses me. When I go to the Michelin website they don't use the D or E designation but rather 114S, etc. Doesn't only a true LT tire use the D or E code exclusively? I have P275/65R18 tires on my Tundra with 114S load/speed rating which is 2601 lbs. @ 44 psi. What would this be; a D or an E? Thanks.
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Old 08-03-2013, 12:33 PM   #76
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Load Range was invented to get away from 6 ply, 8 ply, etc., since ply did not determine the strength of the tire anymore. But now they are coming up with numbers to replace LR. You can back into it by looking into the maximum pressure. LR C = 45 psi, LR D = 65 psi, LR E = 80 psi. But I think they may only be using those numbers for P tires, not LT tires. Tire mavins may correct me on some of this (or all of it).

Your Tundra, like ours, came with P (passenger) tires, not LT tires. They were cheapo Goodrich tires which were wearing fast and at 18,000 miles I figure they might get to 25,000 before they had to go. Since we were planning a long trip, I figured it was better to have better tires that I wouldn't have to replace on the trip. I got LTX A/T2 LR E tires and after 65,000 miles, much of it towing, they are still going, though I think this fall is the time to replace them. They ride better than the OEM tires and certainly have lasted longer. They're expensive, but in the long run, cheaper.

Gene
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Old 08-03-2013, 12:50 PM   #77
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Thanks Gene...I am a little less confused now.

Gene
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Old 08-04-2013, 05:58 AM   #78
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Yes, P type tires come in "Standard Load" (SL) and "Extra Load" (XL), but it is common for the Load Index (eg 114S) to be used.

LT type tires come in Load Ranges (C, D, E, etc) and it is also common to use the load Index, but usually LT tires have dualed rating which are lower, so the Load Index comes out looking differently: (120/116S)
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Old 08-04-2013, 09:39 AM   #79
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The Longacre tire gage (that was recommended earlier in this thread) turned the annoying TPMS warnings on the GoldWing motorcycle into past history. The home air compressor's air chuck with gage was actually 6 psi low at 41 psi and that lower pressure triggered the TPMS warning. The other tire gages were also inaccurate. I now verify tire pressure on all my vehicles with this new gage.

Longacre has factory refurbished units for around $100 versus $135 for new and they come with the same warranty. I returned the unit to check calibration because of the error mentioned above, I thought the error was in the Longacre. It was spot on.

My Dodge door label suggests 45 psi in the rear tires when there is little or no cargo in the bed and 70 psi fully loaded. Even with the full air suspension system, the difference in ride is substantial, especially for full figured folks.

Fortunately, my truck came with Michelin tires as I would have exchanged non Michelins immediately after driving off the dealership lot. The LT265/70R17E tires are rated 3,005 pounds at 70 psi and the rear axle is rated 6,010 pounds. Inflating these tires to the maximum of 80 psi would allow them a load of 3,195 pounds each, but the axle rating would still be the number for load capacity.

Initially, I used around 55 psi in the rear tires as the axle load was under 5,000 pounds. Maybe the Hensley masked any handling issues.

On the next trip in September, the truck and trailer may be nearly loaded to GVW capacity carrying the steel and cast iron camping cooking gear, tables, coolers with water and ice, cooking tent etc we will use to make meals for 20 some family members, so I will run the tire pressure on the rear tires to 70psi.

Since the Kelderman air suspension system included an air compressor and air storage tank and I have an air coupler by the license plate, I can inflate the tires at any time.

I keep the truck in a climate controlled garage where the temperature does not exceed 80 degrees. Thus heat damage to the truck tires is reduced. Unfortunately, our Airstream is parked outside under a roof, so while no sunlight directly hits the tires, the warming 119 degree summer days will negatively impact the life of the trailer tires.

There is a simple but expensive solution to the tire heat issue in Arizona, travel the northern states all summer.
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Old 08-04-2013, 10:01 AM   #80
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"There is a simple but expensive solution to the tire heat issue in Arizona, travel the northern states all summer."

We do it the other way, her Arizona in winter and my Minnesota in summer, taking the long way around to get back and forth.

doug k
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Old 08-18-2013, 06:13 PM   #81
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But those Minnesota 'skeeters' are like small birds.
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Old 08-18-2013, 06:21 PM   #82
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They quit biting after they get a quart......
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