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Old 03-27-2013, 07:12 AM   #29
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Everything I've read says to stick with the automaker's recommended tire pressures for best performance and tire longevity. So I stuck with the Chevy recommended tire pressures on the original 17-inch Bridgestone Duravis tires on my truck: 72 psi rear and 60 psi front. I rotate every 5,000 miles and I'm going to get 50,000 miles out of this set. Hard to beat that. The downside is that at those tire pressures my rig rides like a ... well, like a truck.
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Old 03-27-2013, 09:13 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post

Here in Phoenix, since we get very little rain, our driveway has a light coating of very fine dust on it that looks like sand-colored baking flour. When you drive on it, the dust sticks to the rubber tread; and you can tell exactly which parts of the tire are touching the ground.
Not wanting to move to Phoenix, I bought a tire tread gauge at the local, overpriced auto parts store for about $10 or $12. I check tread periodically to see how the tires are wearing, check for alignment issues and tweak tire pressure. Everyone should have one unless they live in Phoenix. I suppose you could put flour down on the driveway and after you finish checking tires, add some water and bake it in the sun and have matzos or tortillas (I'm not much on bread making).

I assume when you talk about using 55 psi and 65 psi that is for the Michelin Rib tires—if my memory is correct, that is what you have. That is a quite different tire than the LTX series tires and those may work better with higher pressure.

This isn't worth much, but I drove a Silverado pickup 75 miles—maybe 6 years old—because a friend couldn't bring it home after being in the hospital. It felt very much like a truck with wooden tires perhaps—maybe it had high pressure in the tires. It made me appreciate the Tundra even more.

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Old 03-27-2013, 09:19 AM   #31
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I've done extensive observation of my tires over all sorts of road surfaces, and I've found that only the bottoms of my tires touch the road surface.
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Old 03-27-2013, 09:46 AM   #32
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When I picked up my new pickup, it had Michelin LT265/70R17E tires which saved the expense of buying them from the get go. The dealer had the pressures set high. That generated a bone jarring ride. When I got home and studied the door label, I dropped the rear tires to 45 psi per the door label for no load from 70 psi full loads (also the axle rating of 6,010 pounds). Then I set the dash switch to inform the on-board computer tire monitor of that decision. The front tires stayed at 60 psi. The ride was immensely improved.

I use the tire pressure chart for LT truck tires to set the pressure. Currently, with the trailer attached and looking at the rear axle load from the scales of about 3,500 pounds, 50 psi is adequate for the load.

80psi - 3,195
70psi - 3,005
60psi - 2,760
50psi - 2,470
45psi - 2,255
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Old 03-27-2013, 10:52 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by switz View Post
When I picked up my new pickup, it had Michelin LT265/70R17E tires which saved the expense of buying them from the get go. The dealer had the pressures set high. That generated a bone jarring ride. When I got home and studied the door label, I dropped the rear tires to 45 psi per the door label for no load from 70 psi full loads (also the axle rating of 6,010 pounds). Then I set the dash switch to inform the on-board computer tire monitor of that decision. The front tires stayed at 60 psi. The ride was immensely improved.

I use the tire pressure chart for LT truck tires to set the pressure. Currently, with the trailer attached and looking at the rear axle load from the scales of about 3,500 pounds, 50 psi is adequate for the load.

80psi - 3,195
70psi - 3,005
60psi - 2,760
50psi - 2,470
45psi - 2,255
Switz, I think you will find, and it has been my experience, that although 50 psi in your rear tires may carry the weight you have, it may be insufficient to adequately stabilize the truck and trailer under less than perfect conditions. Lower pressure tires on the rear of the TV tend to be "mushy" in respect to side to side movement, and higher pressure tend to be more stable.

For this reason, I carry 80 PSI in the same tires as you have, and yes I can certainly feel the difference in stability.
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Old 03-27-2013, 01:19 PM   #34
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Well I'm glad ya'll are happy with your Michelins... now I just have to figure out how much air i need to run in my Bridgestone Duelers to handle towing AND increase tire life as much as possible. sidewall says 44 psi, door jamb says 33/30.
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Old 03-27-2013, 02:13 PM   #35
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I stay within the range the vehicle manufacturer gives. Though I may be higher than the door sticker, depending . . . . There are instances where handling is compromised by higher than what load vs. pressure demands and braking is negatively affected (according to my own experience and what RMA publishes).

The first set of MICHELINS LTX A/S on this truck went to 120k with 4/32's remaining following this path. The second set failed (internal) with less than 70k on them, but MICHELIN ponied up for LTX M/S 2 this time around.

If I were starting from scratch I'd go with BRIDGESTONE commercial LT tires.

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Old 03-27-2013, 02:44 PM   #36
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Well I'm glad ya'll are happy with your Michelins... now I just have to figure out how much air i need to run in my Bridgestone Duelers to handle towing AND increase tire life as much as possible. sidewall says 44 psi, door jamb says 33/30.
If the tire size/specs match the factory tires, i would think the mfg recommendations would be good. In my case, my tires are well beyond the stock size so the inflation recommendations from the mfg do not work.
Try calling bridgestone and get their recommendation. Get it from the horses mouth so to speak.
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Old 03-27-2013, 03:23 PM   #37
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Dana,

44 psi on the sidewall means you have Load Range C tires. The vehicle manufacturer recommends less though somewhere in the owner's manual it may say to increase pressure for heavy loads.

Most (maybe all) of the more recent trailers have Load Range D tires with a maximum of 65 psi. Many of us are using Load Range E tires on our trucks and trailers with a max. psi of 80.

For driving around town with the truck, follow the manufacturer's recommendations. If you pick up half a ton of bricks, increase pressure to 44 lbs. When you tow, check tables online to see how much to increase pressure for the extra load—probably you are fine with 44 psi with your present tires. If you upgrade tires to LR D or E, then check tables and/or call the tire manufacturer to get their input.

And, someday, you may be blessed with Michelins.

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Old 03-29-2013, 06:49 AM   #38
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.........44 psi on the sidewall means you have Load Range C tires................
Sorry, but 44 psi on the sidewall means the tires are P type Standard Load tires. LT metric Load Range C tires would have 50 psi on the sidewall (with a few exceptions.)
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Old 03-29-2013, 08:29 AM   #39
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although 50 psi in your rear tires may carry the weight you have, it may be insufficient to adequately stabilize the truck and trailer under less than perfect conditions.
Greetings

Last Monday I had four new Michelin LTX M/S2 tires installed on my F150. Same size but E rated instead of the D rating that my previous General Tires that were OEM they replaced. Mind you that I NEVER had a bit of sway with them and I ran them 10 lbs under the max pressure.

On my 600 mile trip towing my AS that I just returned from, I am happy with the new tires for all reasons BUT the sway. It was, at times, frightful. Most times I could not let go of the wheel. I can only conclude that it must be the psi. I checked it at 65psi at each tire. The max is 80psi on the Michelin.

I share this Moosetags as I shopped and the Michelin LTX M/S2 is one of the highest rated load tires. They are certainly quiet and the ride is good. I may not be out towing again for a while but next time I will increase the psi.
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Old 03-29-2013, 08:30 AM   #40
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I have P type Bridgestones on the Tundra. Max pressure is 44# for 2601 pounds of load carrying capacity. Which puts them in the load range "D" category.
I run the Tundra specs when the truck is empty and not towing. 30 front, 33 rear. Increase to 34 front and 39-40 rear.
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Old 03-29-2013, 02:11 PM   #41
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Sorry, but 44 psi on the sidewall means the tires are P type Standard Load tires. LT metric Load Range C tires would have 50 psi on the sidewall (with a few exceptions.)
I guess the tires and me get a C–.

I don't understand why the Michelins rodsterinfi installed are causing sway. I ran 68 and now 72 psi in them and never have had a sway problem. Maybe there is a difference between the M/S 2 and the A/T2's we have.

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Old 03-29-2013, 02:49 PM   #42
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I guess the tires and me get a C–.

I don't understand why the Michelins rodsterinfi installed are causing sway. I ran 68 and now 72 psi in them and never have had a sway problem. Maybe there is a difference between the M/S 2 and the A/T2's we have.

Gene
I think you guys are talking about apples and oranges.....er, tow vehicle tires and trailer tires. Please pay attention!
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