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Old 05-26-2016, 09:53 PM   #1
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Tow vehicle tire pressure

We have a 2016 22' Sport which we tow with a 2004 Ford Expedition, 5.4 liter, with Michelin tires. The recommended tire pressure is 36 psi. Is it necessary to increase the tire pressure on the tow vehicle when pulling the trailer & how much?
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Old 05-26-2016, 10:14 PM   #2
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Youll need to weight your axles and then Compare your tire weight to the load inflation chart of your time manufacturer.
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Old 05-27-2016, 02:11 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcaslaon4449 View Post
We have a 2016 22' Sport which we tow with a 2004 Ford Expedition, 5.4 liter, with Michelin tires. The recommended tire pressure is 36 psi. Is it necessary to increase the tire pressure on the tow vehicle when pulling the trailer & how much?
Thank you.

Hi, put maximum tire pressure that is marked on the sidewall of the tires [possibly 44 lbs] in your rear tires only and you will be fine. This is what I did with my Lincoln and now do with my F-150.
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Old 05-27-2016, 04:21 AM   #4
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Adding pressure to the tow vehicle tires will increase their laterial stiffness and reduce the tendancy for the tow vechile to wander and will improve its ability to resist sway. Do not over inflate the tires above their max., as it would be unsafe. Increasing the tire pressure will also reduce their tendancy to overheat, but will lead to more wear in the center of the tread.
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Old 05-27-2016, 04:26 AM   #5
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You all realize that tires heat up as soon as they start rolling. My rears typically gain 5 psi after rolling for 10 minutes. More on hot days. Going above the sidewall specified max seems to be uncool.
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Old 05-27-2016, 08:59 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by ROBERTSUNRUS View Post
...put maximum tire pressure that is marked on the sidewall of the tires [possibly 44 lbs] in your rear tires only...
Bob, what pressure do you run in the fronts? Sticker says 35 psi normally. Use that in the fronts and 44 psi in the rears?
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Old 05-27-2016, 09:26 AM   #7
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We run our truck tires when towing at the max sidewall pressure of 44 psi for more lateral stiffness, to ensure plenty of land capacity, and I think the firm rear tires help weight distribution.

With the Hensley/ProPride hitch design we don't need the lateral stiffness in front and I wonder if we could run it a little lower for better braking if we need it. We add some weight to the front with weight distribution. There may be a balance here between load and braking needs.
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Old 05-27-2016, 12:17 PM   #8
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Recommended tire pressure per the door placard in my vehicle is 33 psi all the way around.
I have never considered any other pressure than that.
Seems like if I put more than that the TPMS would be giving me messages. Isn't it programmed to set off a light or message if the pressure is 20-30% above or below recommended?
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Old 05-27-2016, 12:25 PM   #9
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I had abnormal wear on the edges of TV rear tires from a long trip out west. Now I put 2-3 extra psi (over the recommended pressure inside the door) in the rear tires and the wear is much more uniform.
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Old 05-27-2016, 01:25 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by m.hony View Post
Recommended tire pressure per the door placard in my vehicle is 33 psi all the way around.
I have never considered any other pressure than that.
Seems like if I put more than that the TPMS would be giving me messages. Isn't it programmed to set off a light or message if the pressure is 20-30% above or below recommended?
I agree, I do the same, whatever is in the door, that's where all my tires are set. I know if the pressure drops by very much, the TPMS sets off the light. I didn't know it would do that if it was too high. My tires all wear pretty evenly, but most of my driving is without the AS.
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Old 05-27-2016, 01:35 PM   #11
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I air mine up a few psi above the manufacturer's recommended pressure, but slightly under the sidewall max, on all 5 tires.
On the last several 4x4 Silverado 1500's that I have owned the tires, especially those on the front axle, had a tendency to wear the outer edges if I followed the manufacturers tire pressure recommendations. Since I've done this the tires wear more evenly, the handling seems improved, and the load capacity is improved. I do not see any negative in doing this.
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Old 05-27-2016, 01:35 PM   #12
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I second what Doug said. I do not tow a travel trailer, but we do tow horse trailers with our SUV. When selecting the first set of replacement tires I went from a P-series 60 profile to a 65 series profile LT tire for higher load handling, gaining around 600 lb. per tire. We ran them at the sidewall maximum pressure when towing (44psi), and the vehicle felt a lot more stable with a loaded trailer. Since it's a pain to let the air out they tended to stay at 44 psi all the time resulting in better highway MPG. My wife did comment that the heavier duty LT tires did make her SUV feel more like a truck than the old Michelin P-Series tires, but then she was using her SUV like a truck so that was appropriate. There was no unusual wear on the previous set of tires after 65,000 miles. The current set are too new to tell how they will respond to being at maximum sidewall pressure.

My recommendation is to try towing with increased tire pressure and see if it makes a difference. I hope that helps.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dkottum View Post
We run our truck tires when towing at the max sidewall pressure of 44 psi for more lateral stiffness, to ensure plenty of land capacity, and I think the firm rear tires help weight distribution.

With the Hensley/ProPride hitch design we don't need the lateral stiffness in front and I wonder if we could run it a little lower for better braking if we need it. We add some weight to the front with weight distribution. There may be a balance here between load and braking needs.
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Old 05-27-2016, 01:45 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by richw46 View Post
I agree, I do the same, whatever is in the door, that's where all my tires are set. I know if the pressure drops by very much, the TPMS sets off the light. I didn't know it would do that if it was too high. My tires all wear pretty evenly, but most of my driving is without the AS.

I don't know if the factory TPMS in the truck will give an alert if the tire pressure is too high, but I believe the Dill TPMS on the trailer will give an alert if the tire pressure is too high.
Too much pressure isn't necessarily caused by someone simply putting too much air in.
Too much pressure could be a sign of heat which could be a sign of failure.
The Dill TPMS installed on the trailer shows tire pressure and temperature.


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Old 05-27-2016, 02:46 PM   #14
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A trick to determine a good running pressure is, with white liquid shoe polish paint a stripe across the tire, set your tire pressures at X, then go for a drive, 1/2-1 mile making a couple of turns. Inspect the stripe, center of tread wear indicates high pressure, edge of tread wear indicates low pressures. ( or excessive turning speeds LOL).
Attach the trailer and repeat. Tore sidewall maximum pressure is likely at 72deg F. Don't worry about running heat induced pressure rise. Make good notes, use a good tire gauge. I the ride seems soft you might want to look at LT rated tires next time. I run the LT tires on my half ton Chevy WT's to good results. Tires max pressure is 80psi, I run about 60psi.
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