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Old 05-27-2016, 04:43 PM   #15
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I run a similar config to m.hony... Tundra/Equalizer/AS (although we have a lighter 25' trailer vs his 30')

I always ran the tires (Bridgestones came new on the Tundra) at the presure specified on the door tag in the belief that Toyota and Bridgestone calculated those settings for the truck operating writhin it's weight ratings. After a 6,500 trip last summer I noticed serious wear on the outer edges of all four tires, but especially the rear pair. After 35,000 total miles I junked all four tires due to zero tread remaining on about the outer inch of each tire despite plenty of tread remaining in the center.

Bridgestone/Firestone gave me a 50% discount a new set (I chose a different model with better wear and heat specs) as a warranty concession. Bridgestone does not offer inflation/load tables for any of their tires according to a request I made to their tech center online and the local Bridgestone/Firestone dealer.

Excessive center tread wear is a sign of over-inflation. Excessive wear on the outer edges (like I had) is a sign of under-inflation. Given my experience with the original tires while towing, I now run the rear pair at the max cold inflation pressure which is 44 lbs. I run the fronts half way between the door sticker and the max pressure.

I now have 5,000 AS towing miles and 6,000 total miles on the new tires. So far I see slight wear on the outer edges, but not like I had with the original set at door sticker inflation pressures. I like the way the truck feels. I think this is a better setting for me.

To the OP: lots of good perspective here. Your needs are a function of your specific tow vehicle, your tires, your hitch and its weight distribution setting, how much cargo you carry, the weight of your trailer, the climate you drive in, how fast you drive, etc.. Try it with the door sticker pressures. If you see unbalanced tire wear across the tread, or get a squishy feel in steering or on bumps, raise the pressure a bit and see if it gets better. Some people even use tire temperature readings (immediately after stopping from towing... taken at both edges and the center of the tread on at least one front and one rear tire, all four is better) to see if the tire heat is excessive in the middle (overinflation) or outer edges (under inflation).

To clarify LyleRussell's comment... The "max pressure" on tires is the maximum cold inflation pressure. Tire manufactures expect operating pressures to be higher and have taken that into account.

To m.hony: My Tundra's TPMS does not alarm at pressures above the door sticker recommended setting.
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Old 05-27-2016, 04:47 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by Bob662 View Post
Bob, what pressure do you run in the fronts? Sticker says 35 psi normally. Use that in the fronts and 44 psi in the rears?

I do the same except I only inflate the rears to 40 PSI.
At 44 PSI the tire loading is supposed to be 2,400 LBS, at the 4,050 rear axle loading on my F-150 I only need to take it 40 PSI. The front axle loading is fine with 35 PSI .
I found that this gives me a good ride and I never have to mess with adjusting tire pressures. The tire monitoring system in the truck has not gone of at the increased tire pressure in the rear tires.
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Old 05-27-2016, 05:08 PM   #17
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Truck GVWR 6950
Both axle total 7800
Four 20" P-rated tires max total load 10400 at 44 psi

With near even weight distribution (40 lbs more weight front to to rear loaded w/Airstream) we have plenty of tire capacity, we've been running the front a bit lower 40 psi most of the time for braking and handling traction. I'm thinking of making this our standard.

Good thread here, thanks.
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Old 05-27-2016, 06:08 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by dkottum View Post
Truck GVWR 6950
Both axle total 7800
Four 20" P-rated tires max total load 10400 at 44 psi

With near even weight distribution (40 lbs more weight front to to rear loaded w/Airstream) we have plenty of tire capacity, we've been running the front a bit lower 40 psi most of the time for braking and handling traction. I'm thinking of making this our standard.

Good thread here, thanks.
Sounds like you've got it dialed in
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Old 05-28-2016, 12:49 AM   #19
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Long answer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ROBERTSUNRUS View Post
Hi, put maximum tire pressure that is marked on the sidewall of the tires [possibly 44 lbs] in your rear tires only and you will be fine. This is what I did with my Lincoln and now do with my F-150.
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Originally Posted by Bob662 View Post
Bob, what pressure do you run in the fronts? Sticker says 35 psi normally. Use that in the fronts and 44 psi in the rears?

Hi, My Lincoln came with "P" rated tires with a max pressure of 44 lbs. The factory sticker said to run 26 lbs in the front and 33 lbs in the rear. I set my front tires at 35 lbs and my rear tires at 40 lbs.

My Lincoln replacement tires have a higher load at a lower pressure. These Toyo's have a max pressure of 35 lbs. I run my Toyo's at 30 lbs all the way around except when towing. Then I run 35 lbs in the rear.

My F-150 has LT tires. Factory setting is 40 lbs all the way around. These tires have a max of 50 lbs. My one and only trip with the F-150 was last year and it was our cross country trip. Over 13,000 miles towing our trailer. I originally added 5 lbs to the rear tires, [45 lbs], but felt a little push on turns. So I set my rear tires to 50 lbs [max] and it was perfect.
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Old 05-28-2016, 05:34 AM   #20
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Lots of great observations and advice in above posts. My data may or may not be valid due to so many variables as already stated. But I'll share it for what it's worth.

Several years and trucks ago an old school alignment tech (no computer only chalk lines, levels, and multiple test drives) told me to run all my tires at sidewall pressure or 5 psi less and ignore the door sticker # designed for soft ride and mileage. Man I wish their shop was still open because nobody does it as well as they did.

That said our '15 F 150 is sporting P tires with XL rating , so 51 psi max pressure. I run them @46 psi all the time and am very pleased. Smooth ride empty or towing our Pete (FC 27fb) or the other two toy trailers. 8k miles so far and no discernible tire wear.

Hope this helps.


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Old 05-28-2016, 08:46 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by SpletKay06 View Post
Youll need to weight your axles and then Compare your tire weight to the load inflation chart of your time manufacturer.
This thread contains lots of anecdotal information about what works and what doesn't but SpletKay06 is on the right track. If you haven't taken time to obtain axle weights (and individual tire weights) all this discussion may lead you down the wrong path.

Look below for example of a tire inflation chart posted by Michelin. Do some digging and find a chart for your brand, wheel diameter, and model of tire. Then check the weight on your axle - it's easy to do at a truck stop. Compare your tire weight (axle weight divided by two will be pretty close) to the chart and air up your tires to the correct pressure.
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Old 05-28-2016, 02:27 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by LyleRussell View Post
You all realize that tires heat up as soon as they start rolling. My rears typically gain 5 psi after rolling for 10 minutes. More on hot days. Going above the sidewall specified max seems to be uncool.
Tell us more about what you're saying. I may be misunderstanding what you're getting at.

Do you mean we should try to take into account how much the tire/air will increase in temperature and then back off of the amount of air we put into the tire in order to compensate for how much it's going to rise in temperature? If so, I don't think that's what tire manufacturers are saying.

Tire charts almost always indicate to check pressure when tires are cold. You can argue that in northern climates in the winter the cold temperature is quite a bit different than a cold tire in the summer months in a warm climate. We could probably discuss that all day and then some. Regardless, if you check the tires when cold - regardless of what "cold" temperature actually is - then I think you are following the manufacturers guidelines.

Filling a cold tire to maximum pressure, assuming it needs that to support the load, then yes - the pressure will be above the sidewall rating when hot. Don't check tire pressure when the tires are hot.
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Old 05-28-2016, 04:46 PM   #23
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It seems to me that there is no reason to go higher that the DOT sticker for the front tires. Many truck manufacturers now suggest restoring at least half the rise from TT tongue weight on the hitch. That being the case, the front wheels have less load on them with the WDH bars attached, than when the trailer isn't connected, so no reason to go up on front wheel tire pressure?

The rear wheels are different. they are carrying more load than if unhitched, so I get why more pressure is appropriate.
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Old 05-28-2016, 07:44 PM   #24
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You want the maximum load carrying capacity of the rear tires. You are probably fully loaded with trailer tongue weight and rear compartment load in the TV. Pump them up to max rating on the tire sidewall. For the front tires it is a matter of trial and error. You want enough pressure to carry the extra load transferred by the WD set-up but only enough to give a good foot print on the front for good steering, braking and no squirm in the nose dive in a hard stop. On my Dakota I run full 44 psig rear and 35 psig front. I get good even wear and the tries run cool. Once in Tx we had the oil changed at a Pep Boys and they dropped the rear pressure (unknown to us) to standard comfort level. We discovered very hot tires two days later, which also explained the sloppy handling. We were fully loaded in the box, and not pulling a trailer. Always inform your garage what pressures you want in your tires.
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Old 05-29-2016, 12:19 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JCWDCW View Post
Always inform your garage what pressures you want in your tires.
JCW

Hi, If about to travel with my trailer, or while towing on the road, I always tell the shop what tire pressure that I want.
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Old 05-29-2016, 06:01 AM   #26
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Wasnt forum member "capriracer" a tire engineer for a big mfgr?

I wonder what he would offer...
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Old 05-30-2016, 08:42 AM   #27
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Wasnt forum member "capriracer" a tire engineer for a big mfgr?

I wonder what he would offer...
Yes, I was. And I used to answer questions on this subject.

First, there is a vehicle tire placard on every vehicle sold in the US - and if I understand this correctly, the rest of the world as well. That is the pressure specified by the vehicle manufacturer for the tire size indicated - and because of that, MUST be able to handle the maximum specified payload plus the vehicle weight - that is, the fully loaded condition.

It is my understanding that if the vehicle manufacturer wishes, they can specify pressures for other conditions (such as fully empty) either on another sticker, or in the owners manual, (or not at all!)

Please note that because tires are standardized, it doesn't matter where a tire is manufactured or by whom, that pressure will apply for all tires of that particular tire size. It does NOT apply to tires of a different size.

Please also note, there is a difference between P type tires and LT type tires - and I include those letters when I say *size*.

Second, every tire sold in the US must be marked with a maximum load and a maximum inflation pressure. This comes in 2 forms:

a) Max Load XXXX, Max pressure YY - note that no relationship is implied.

b) Max Load XXXX at YY pressure - note that the max pressure is NOT specified, but a relationship is.

My experience says that ALL LT tires are done per the second method - and what you should take away from that is that you can use more pressure than what is listed - BUT - I would warn folks to be careful when they do that they have a good grasp of the principles involved.

My experience also says that P type tires use the first methods a lot, but there are some tires listed the second way. My experience also says that some tire manufacturers (and some dealers) aren't very tidy about things and will list the maximum pressure using the *@* symbol - indicating a relationship, which in my view is not correct.

Perhaps, *misleading* is a better word! I hope dkottum won't think I am picking on him, but here is a quote that illustrates the problem:

Quote:
Originally Posted by dkottum View Post
Truck GVWR 6950
Both axle total 7800
Four 20" P-rated tires max total load 10400 at 44 psi ........
I'm sorry, but those tires at rated for max load at 35 psi, while 44 psi is the maximum.

Please note: I am not a fan of using the published load tables to set pressures. Not only do most people not understand how to do this correctly, a person can change the handling characteristics of the vehicle for the worse. If you've watch NASCAR races, you will hear comments about changing pressure to changes the handling of the car. The principal applies to trucks as well.

So I am a firm advocate of using the vehicle tire placard pressures unless you change tire size. If that is not enough to suit you, I'll suggest you get a bigger truck.
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Old 05-30-2016, 09:07 AM   #28
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My tv is an '06 2500HD Duramax and I always use pressures recommended on the door sticker. 55 F, 80 R. I use this when towing or not towing. I also know that tires are always ready to do what they are asked to do. Take a trip, tow a boat, Airstream, car trailer or haul a pallet of St. Augustine grass. In almost 200,000 mile, it has worked for me.
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