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Old 05-05-2016, 10:20 PM   #15
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Prior to getting a company-provided car, I drove my F250 as my daily driver. Most days I was pretty mobile.... Not just driven to work and parked for the day. I guess I never saw it as a hindrance of any kind..... I love driving the truck, and operate accordingly. Parked in the easiest place available, considering the long wheelbase. It was definitely better for visibility than any car I can think of. Sitting up higher, you can keep an eye on traffic much better. As far as the ride? Guess what? It rides like a truck! However, I can drive that truck all day without getting fatigued like I do in a car. Had a lot to do with the seating posture..... More like a chair than a freakin' sled with your butt 12" from the road and your legs out in front of you.

If I had to choose, I'll take a truck any day of the week.

I guess it's just what you set your mind to, and what your preferences are.




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Old 05-05-2016, 11:16 PM   #16
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First understand "payload" is the load you are carrying on the truck.

The published info for a truck provides a "payload" number, but depends on optional equipment. The door sticker provides a weight "that you should not exceed", and that is also referred to as "payload". Then the dealer gets the truck and may some optional equipment; again the "payload" number has changed and you don't know what it is.

Take the truck, fill the fuel tank, put you and whoever else will travel with you in the truck and weigh it at a truck scale. The difference between that weight and the GVWR number on the door sticker is the load you can carry without exceeding GVWR. That's your actual "payload" for the unhitched truck, as recommended by the manufacturer.

Then realize you can still overload an axle without exceeding GVWR. Just drop your Airstream on the hitch receiver and load a bunch of stuff in the bed behind the truck's axle, you can be within recommended "payload" (under GVWR) but your rear axle load may exceed GAWR.

That's one of the reasons we use a weight distribution hitch, which distributes some of the Airstream hitch weight and load behind the truck's rear axle among the truck's axles, and 10 - 20% to the Airstream's axle(s).

One of the important things to note is that the weight distribution hitch has moved some of the "payload" to the Airstream.

So you're still too heavy. Don't give up so easy. You can move some of the truck's bed load forward, easing the job of the w.d. hitch. You can move some of the truck's load into the Airstream, easing the job of the w.d. hitch. And you can move some stuff rearward in the Airstream for travel, and you can even move the Airstream battery location rearward. We push our recliner chairs back to lighten the hitch load.

These things effectively reduce the "payload" you actually carry.

There is still another consideration. Heavy hitch loads along with heavy load in the back of the truck make the job of the w.d. hitch difficult. Long wheelbase tow vehicles make the job of the w.d. hitch difficult. So difficult that when attempting to lift this heavy load with the w.d. hitch, more so with long wheelbase, the resistance can cause the truck's receiver and frame to flex, and that flexing uses some of the force the w.d. hitch applies. The result is sometimes you may not be able to distribute as much weight as you would expect.

The short answer is always to compare the truck's "payload" with some list of weights you may carry. That's only a starting point, and may not be a guarantee of success. There's more to it than that, and you can control much of it. Or you can enlist the help of a towing expert to set up your truck, hitch, and Airstream for optimum performance.

Back to the F150 Ecoboost. A near perfect match to a mid-size Airstream when you have it set up properly for towing and manage your loads. F250 and you will still need to have it set up properly for towing and manage your loads for optimum performance.

For their own reasons Airstreamers use and like what they have, F150 and F250; they each work well for each individual's use.
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Old 05-06-2016, 12:07 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhoelscher View Post
All,
The 27FB has a GVWR 7600.

The vehicle I am about to purchase is an F-150 Lariat, 156" WB, 4x4, 3.5L EcoB, 3.55, Max Tow with the following specs:

GCWR: 17000
GVWR: 7000
GVW/Base Curb Weight (includes full tank of gas): 4784
Payload: 1668

Using the RV Tow Check Calculator (http://fifthwheelst.com/rvtc_calculator.html) and assuming 410 lbs of passengers, 500 lbs of cargo, and a 15% tongue weight. This calculator says this truck can safely tow up to a 8706 lbs trailer.
Noob question, but I don't understand how the math works out on that calculator.

Assuming, as the OP stated,
410 lbs of passengers
+ 500 lbs of cargo
+ 1306 lbs tongue weight (15% of their allowed 8706 lb. trailer)
= 2216 lbs, or 548 lbs over the vehicle's payload 1668 lbs.

What gives?

If I'm looking at it right, the site assumes that the truck's payload is GVWR-GVW (curb weight), which would be 2216 lbs, which matches what I just calculated. However, the OP stated that his payload (I assume from the door sticker) is 1668 lbs.

Would it be correct to assume that the curb weight is a generic published number, & far lower than what the OP's truck actually weighs, thus leading to a much lower payload rating? Losing 550 lbs of payload somewhere seems like a lot.
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Old 05-06-2016, 06:03 AM   #18
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In 2013 I needed to get a different tow vehicle as we found the axle ratings were exceeded on my 2007 Mercedes ML:320 CDI when the 2013 25FB International Serenity was fully loaded for camping.

I went to the Ford F150 web site and used their "build a truck" software.

The difference in payload between the base no fills truck and the King Ranch model was a 500 pound load penalty for all the glitz like leather seats, chrome everything whatever.

That is 500 pounds of non-movable weight in the King Ranch model and one had a payload of close to 1,000 pounds. The tongue weight of the 25FB was 1,175 pounds. So that particular truck would be overloaded if the trailer were attached and passenger was aboard let alone the driver.

That is why there are so many payload conversations here. We are not able to squeeze five pounds into a three pound bag, so to speak.

The variables of the door post numbers (Gross Vehicle Weight, Front Axle Rating, Rear Axle Rating, and maximum trailer weight and perhaps even the net payload will be displayed) all set the limits for that specific vehicle.

As mentioned, a trip across some CAT scales with a full fuel tank along with the driver and usual planned passenger will give the actual front and rear axle loads and the total weight of the truck. At this point of the demo drive, the driver is out the cost of the scale ticket (around $12) and filling the fuel tank.

The differences between the actual scale weights for the axles and total weight versus the door label numbers serve as the basic for all the rest of the calculations.

If a set of side steps are added along with a camper shell, their weights have reduced the payload since the truck empty weight increased. All the added accessories going forward reduce the vehicles load capacity and could even overload an axle capacity.

Then the tire variables must be considered between the "Passenger car tires" often installed on the ton trucks virus the "LT or light Truck" tires found on the heavier load capacity trucks. The two extremes are the marshmallow ride of the big 50s cars and the super stiff ride of a high load capacity heavy duty one ton or higher rated truck of perhaps ten years ago.

Note that I had the factory basic weights in their detailed build sheet specifications. The actual numbers after all the factory installed options reflected several hundreds of pounds more empty weight. After driving off the lot, I went to a truck stop, filled the tank and weighed the truck. Now I had the actual starting weight numbers that were much different than a bare truck.

As I added each of the after sale accessories, I crossed the scales to see the impact of each purchase on the payload and axle loads.

YMMV
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Old 05-06-2016, 08:44 AM   #19
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Good Morning, switz. Thanks for laying it out that way. Your conclusion is logical and based on the math. Hard to refute.

It seems to me that even if the tongue weight was 1200 lbs and the passengers 410 lbs, we could put darn few things in the bed of the truck or the cab. Of course, then why have a Super Crew cab, right? I think we will go look at the F250s; especially since the 2017 models will be as modern as the F150s are today! Thank you!
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Old 05-06-2016, 09:47 AM   #20
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DPRoberts, Spot on. I totally agree with your math and conclusion! Thank you for laying it out that way!
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Old 05-06-2016, 09:51 AM   #21
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RPatrick16,
No real aversion, just really like the F150. That said, it looks like the F250 is what we will go with given the F150 payload limitations. Thanks!
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Old 05-06-2016, 10:08 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhoelscher View Post
RPatrick16,
No real aversion, just really like the F150. That said, it looks like the F250 is what we will go with given the F150 payload limitations. Thanks!

You'll love it...... ❤️👍👌


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1987 Avion 34W
1995 Ford F250 7.3L PowerStroke

"I don't mean to sound degrading but with a face like that you got nothing to laugh about" Rod Stewart (Faces)
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Old 05-06-2016, 11:18 AM   #23
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Looks like to me that you got it figured out.
Go get that shiny trailer and F150 and go campin'!
Enjoy it!
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Old 05-06-2016, 11:56 AM   #24
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Advice is a dangerous thing. So, let's talk experience. I've towed small TTs with everything from a Chevy Vega (have you stopped laughing yet? - yes, it eventually cracked in half), a Pontiac 6000, a GMC Jimmy (S-15), a GMC Envoy and a GMC Terrain. The Vega, 6000 and Terrain got pushed around so long distance travel was not comfortable. The Jimmy and Envoy employed frames and were heavier as a result. They also had larger engines, but overall, they were substantially better. Engine size may not have been a big thing with a small TT, but some of those engines did work hard. So, when we decided to order a 25' AS, we figured we needed a good, solid tow vehicle. We opted for a GMC Denali 2500 Diesel, and it has served admirably. We don't notice the AS. The truck is comfortable and passengers are often surprised when they realize it's a diesel. And, its towing package is very nice. I often wonder if the AS tows that well, or the truck makes it tow that well. I may never know. It's not my daily driver. I have a 14 yr old Vibe for that (car just won't quit - but that's another story).
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Old 05-06-2016, 12:02 PM   #25
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Yeah, really, go get that F-150 only I would get one with the 3.73 instead of the 3.55 rear end ratio. Not that much difference in gas mileage, but a whole lot of difference in power to the pedal.

Another thing, don't worry so much about the listed payload. When you think about the fact that some dealers, and Airstream magazines, laud the use of lowly passenger cars and make statements that their set up passenger cars can do a better job of towing than even a 3/4 ton truck, well, you should feel pretty safe to conclude that a truck CAN tow as good or better than a passenger car. So go for it and keep us posted.
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Old 05-06-2016, 12:12 PM   #26
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Your truck will do fine

We are newbies too, having just picked up a 2015 FC 25 Twin in Melbourne, FL and towed it home to Georgetown, TX with our 2016 Ford F-150 Lariat Fx2 with 3.5L V6 Ecoboost with Max Tow Package. This was a little over 1200 miles. The truck hardly sweated. Ran about 1500 RPMs cruising on the highways at 63 MPH. We avg'd 11.8 MPG (20.1 MPG not towing on the way out to FL). Very similar specs to your setup. You will do fine. Our truck had LOTS of extra power to spare and stopped very well (gain set on 7.0).
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Old 05-06-2016, 12:49 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pappy19 View Post
Yeah, really, go get that F-150 only I would get one with the 3.73 instead of the 3.55 rear end ratio. Not that much difference in gas mileage, but a whole lot of difference in power to the pedal.

Another thing, don't worry so much about the listed payload. When you think about the fact that some dealers, and Airstream magazines, laud the use of lowly passenger cars and make statements that their set up passenger cars can do a better job of towing than even a 3/4 ton truck, well, you should feel pretty safe to conclude that a truck CAN tow as good or better than a passenger car. So go for it and keep us posted.
Remember the 2017 F150 3.5 EB's will have the 10 speed trany, and have more HP and torque and payload with newer suspension and frame!
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Old 05-06-2016, 01:29 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gypsydad View Post
Remember the 2017 F150 3.5 EB's will have the 10 speed trany, and have more HP and torque and payload with newer suspension and frame!
Actually the reports are that HP will stay at 365 but torque will increase to 450 lb ft!

And yes, the 10 speed tranny.

Not sure about payload. They just modified the design. Are they making more changes?
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