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Old 02-05-2015, 06:13 AM   #85
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IMHO.....get that set up properly & slow down.

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Old 02-05-2015, 06:40 AM   #86
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Like the OP, I bought a QX56 (primarily because the wife hated driving a manual crew cab diesel Dually) and despite the PP hitch it was miserable to tow with, felt like my 28ft International was just too much, constant downshifting just to maintain speed on the slightest grade and real hills were an RPM drill to tap into the V8's torque curve. Mileage and range weren't good at all. Dilemma of loving towing with a diesel along with SUV advantages solved by GL350. Fantastic in every regard...not going to harp on it, just my 2 cents.
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Old 05-05-2015, 03:09 PM   #87
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I bought an F250 Super Duty in January 2013 to replace my 2004 Tundra. I towed a 4,000 pound TT with the Tundra 4x4 which had a 4.7L engine was rated at 7,000 lbs tow weight. The Tundra was the best vehicle I ever had for property management but it was scary for towing, all over the road. I think the F250 diesel with power tow mirrors is best. Consumers Report said 16 mpg for it and 13 mpg for the Dodge Ram 2500 which seems to be accurate for both my Ford and my cousin's 2012 Dodge. On the highway I get 30 mpg at 40- 42 mph in 6th gear, 20 mpg at 60 mph (24-26 if 60-80' behind a semi) and about 13-16 mpg at 80 mph with no other vehicle in front of me, all according to the onboard computer which will provide mileage each minute. Much less mpg when towing my newer 7,300 pound TT of course, but the Ford is rock steady. The only drawback is it's big and so is the turning radius. The backup camera is fantastic.
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Old 05-05-2015, 05:49 PM   #88
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I think the 2nd generation Tundras are are little bigger, stronger, and more powerful than the first generation Tundras, but are still half-ton (heavy half) trucks and have the limitations of half-ton trucks.
That being said, I still love my Tundra and my next truck will be another Tundra.


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Old 06-15-2015, 08:08 PM   #89
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Tow with what you want and are comfortable with. My GL 550 is priced about loke these big pick ups. It has 429hp 516 ft lb. Rated 7500 lbs with out load dist hitch. Rated 3600 front 3900 rear. At the scales my front is 3100 and rear 3900. My 87 34' does way 8000 loaded with Hensley. The GM SUV do not have active suspension, that is the main difference. My set up will cruise at 70-80 mph all day long. The big pick ups are bigger but will not out run me. I feel comfortable. I hope everyone else is as happy as I am.
Is that 7500lbs. the weight of a trailer it can pull? Or, is it the GL 550 GVWR? My Tundra is rated to pull 10300lbs. but the GVWR of the truck is only 7100lbs. With two passengers, full tank of gas and very little in the bed, it is weighing around 6200lbs. Doesn't leave much room to add much cargo weight to trailer. I am having trouble being able to keep the weight within specs because the tongue weight with a loaded trailer may be enough to exceed the 7100lb. capacity. Have a Holiday Rambler now but want an Airstream Classic at least 31'.
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Old 06-16-2015, 05:05 AM   #90
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The number you are looking for is GCWR. Gross Combination. The 7500 lb is for the trailer alone. However, you are supposed to add trailer and loaded vehicle to get GCWR. The weight dist hitch changes all of the dynamics of the numbers. I transfer enough weight to the front so that the rear is not overloaded, including the weight of my hitch. Your Tundra will handle a 31' AS very well with no problem. I pulled a 1973 31' for years with a 1978 1/2 ton GMC, 350 engine, 3 spd auto and 3.73 gear. No problem. You have a very capable vehicle for any size AS. That's the point of AS. Try it and see. Others may differ, but just try it.


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Old 06-16-2015, 08:45 AM   #91
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The number you are looking for is GCWR. Gross Combination. The 7500 lb is for the trailer alone. However, you are supposed to add trailer and loaded vehicle to get GCWR. The weight dist hitch changes all of the dynamics of the numbers. I transfer enough weight to the front so that the rear is not overloaded, including the weight of my hitch. Your Tundra will handle a 31' AS very well with no problem. I pulled a 1973 31' for years with a 1978 1/2 ton GMC, 350 engine, 3 spd auto and 3.73 gear. No problem. You have a very capable vehicle for any size AS. That's the point of AS. Try it and see. Others may differ, but just try it.


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Thanks for the info. My 2008 4x4 double cab Tundra's GCWR is around 17100 pounds(trailer weight & truck weight combined) according to the book. My Holiday Rambler GVWR is 10000lbs., with a dry weight of 7780lbs and tongue weight of 780lbs. Most guidelines say tongue weight can be anywhere between 10 and 15% of trailers total weight. I have trouble getting the Equalizer WD hitch to raise the rear enough to keep my headlights down to normal and avoid oncoming drivers thinking I have my bright lights on. The axles are not over loaded with front rated at 4000lbs and rear at 4100lbs. Connected, total truck weight per scales is slightly over the 7100 GVWR recommended for my Tundra. Last time I got the combined weight of both together it was 15200lbs So, the tongue weight must be more than the dry tongue weight shown on the weight sticker inside of the trailer. My truck pulls it fine, just would rather be within the weight ratings. I know Airstreams pull better and weight distribution may be better also. I keep looking for a well kept gently used one to upgrade to.
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Old 06-16-2015, 09:00 AM   #92
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It seems the folks from the south and east get by with smaller tow vehicles, here in montana most of the tow vehicles are 3/4 ton to 1 ton pickups with diesel engines. Probably because every place you go is up hill.....
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Old 06-16-2015, 09:41 AM   #93
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Coolbike for checking the weights do a search on Ron Gratz who has a very solid method of doing the weight calculations for WD setups. You can use the attached spreadsheet that I built to enter the numbers from the scales for the minimum of 3 weighings that you need.

You may not get back to level on the truck. Most manufacturers don't expect that to happen. For GM they say measure to the bottom of the front wheel well just the truck, then hitch the trailer without WD and measure again. Target would be 1/2 way between the two measurements.

The file has sample data for my GMC Sierra 2500.

Cat Calc Sierra 2500 5-3-14.xlsx
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Old 06-17-2015, 05:58 AM   #94
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For the Tundra 4x4, I suspect the rear suspension, springs and shocks are biased for offroading. Thus lots of soft travel rates. I see this especially on Jeep products. It is difficult to achieve level load or get the weight to the front with WD hitch with the long soft set up. My suggestion to correct and not effect empty ride quality would be; first choice, add rear adjustable air bags. Second and cheaper I would change shocks to something designed for towing first. Third, the progressive add a leaf springs work well, but some effect empty ride quality more than others. The Air Lift is the ticket. You will be happy especially if you get the on board compressor and can adjust on the fly. Good Luck.


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Old 06-24-2015, 09:42 PM   #95
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i have towed with two different Tundra's, a 2008 and a 2014. both of them had soft suspensions more suited for an SUV. rear end sag was quite noticeable with the torsion axle trailers which require everything to be level. with my 10,000# boat and trailer, these trucks were insufficient to do the job. i did, however, add air bags to both of these rigs and it certainly helped level out the trailers i tow. i was right at the max rating, which is never a good idea from my perspective so i went with something more suited to heavy duty towing.
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Old 06-25-2015, 08:55 AM   #96
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i have towed with two different Tundra's, a 2008 and a 2014. both of them had soft suspensions more suited for an SUV. rear end sag was quite noticeable with the torsion axle trailers which require everything to be level. with my 10,000# boat and trailer, these trucks were insufficient to do the job. i did, however, add air bags to both of these rigs and it certainly helped level out the trailers i tow. i was right at the max rating, which is never a good idea from my perspective so i went with something more suited to heavy duty towing.

Thanks for your input. This is what I am experiencing also. My trailer is rated at 10000# GVWR but we don't carry that much. The scale weight is usually 8500 to 9000# loaded. The problem is tongue weight, which brings my truck close to it's max GVWR of 7100# with 2 people on board. I have the trailer perfectly level right now but the truck sags a bit in back even with WD hitch. I am thinking about adding air bags also to help that and keep my headlights at a more normal angle. I am thinking about Firestone Ride Rite air bags. Do you remember what you installed?
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Old 06-26-2015, 03:53 AM   #97
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coolbikeman View Post
Thanks for your input. This is what I am experiencing also. My trailer is rated at 10000# GVWR but we don't carry that much. The scale weight is usually 8500 to 9000# loaded. The problem is tongue weight, which brings my truck close to it's max GVWR of 7100# with 2 people on board. I have the trailer perfectly level right now but the truck sags a bit in back even with WD hitch. I am thinking about adding air bags also to help that and keep my headlights at a more normal angle. I am thinking about Firestone Ride Rite air bags. Do you remember what you installed?
If your rear axle sags, it is a symptom. Not of bad suspension, but of bad weight distribution. If your weight distribution is right, the front and rear suspension of your tow vehicle will go down exactly the same distance. If the rear goes down more, you should be worried about much more than just your headlights. It also means that your front wheels have less traction, which is at least annoying but can also be very dangerous. Putting in air suspension will cure the symptom and the leveling of your headlights, but not the traction and handling problems. I will not describe what can happen if your front wheels don't have enough traction - I leave that to your imagination.

The solution is adjusting both the weight distribution and the ball height in such a way that both front and rear suspension of your TV go down exactly the same and your trailer is level. You may have to do this a few times until you get both the WD and the ball height right. This can be done by putting small pieces of masking tape on all four fenders dead central above each axle. Put a small horizontal line on each piece of masking tape. Take your TV and trailer to a patch of very level ground, like an empty parking lot. Without trailer or tow bar, measure the height of all four lines above the ground. Then hitch up and measure again. Also look at your rig from a distance and see if your trailer is level (or use a level to measure it). If your TV goes down more or less the same on all four corners, but your trailer is not level, you will want to first adjust your ball height. If your trailer is more or less level, but your TV goes down much more front or back, adjust the weight distribution first. Keep adjusting both and measuring the results until you get both right. Then you will know that all four wheels of your TV will have traction when towing - which may save your life.

If you have trouble getting the weight distribution to level the TV, it probably means that your tongue weight is too much, or that you need heavier WD. Tongue weight should typically be 10% of your trailer weight.
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Old 06-26-2015, 05:09 AM   #98
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If your rear axle sags, it is a symptom. Not of bad suspension, but of bad weight distribution. If your weight distribution is right, the front and rear suspension of your tow vehicle will go down exactly the same distance.
Agree. Something is not right with the WDH. Adjustment, sizing, perhaps receiver flex??? If the ball is too far back from the bumper flex in the hardware may be a factor.

Coolbikeman.... can you post a side profile image of your rig so we can see what the connection looks like? Thnxs
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