Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-30-2004, 01:02 PM   #1
Rivet Master
 
Cracker's Avatar
 
Currently Looking...
Pittsfield , Maine
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 1,099
Topper or boxes?

I'm trying to figure out how to set up my truck as a dedicated tow vehicle. I've looked at installing a high-quality crossover box with a pair of innerside boxes - or at the installation of a high-quality fiberglass topper with rear doors (---eliminate the tailgate.) Without "leading" any comments by voicing my own thoughts, what do others see as the advantages and disadvantages of either concept.
__________________

__________________
Cracker

2003 GMC 3500 D/A, CC, LB, 4x4 and 2000 Airstream Excella 30. WBCCI 7074
Cracker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2004, 01:47 PM   #2
Rivet Master
 
59toaster's Avatar
 
1959 22' Caravanner
Atlanta , Georgia
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 2,197
Images: 22
Topper is Nice EXCEPT when what you want is in the front of the bed. After the last truck I had with a topper my idea of the right one has changed some. I would recomend a bed drawer but can't use it when your coach is hooked up. Next option is to buy a topper with side doors. That makes accessing items you may need on the road much eaiser.

Down side is security. The average topper you can simply yank on the door and something will break or bend and your stuff is gone. I had that happen with a truck. Thatnfully they tripped my burgular alarm and took off when the siren sounded.

The steel service truck toppers are more secure and some are very secure but not nearly as nice looking. Weight is close to a wash. Most fibergrlass toppers are very thick and weight close to the same as a steel.

Cross overs are nice untill you have something large that you want out of the weather. Most are fairly secure.

Bed covers. Only one I have seen that I concidered secure was the roll up metal style. They did a fairly good job making those secure. The Fiberglass cover uses almost the same set up as a fiberglass topper for a latch. Would not be hard to get into it.
__________________

__________________
1959 22' Caravanner
1988 R20 454 Suburban.
Atlanta, GA
59toaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2004, 01:53 PM   #3
Moderator
Commercial Member
 
eubank's Avatar
 
1967 30' Sovereign
Bosque Farms , New Mexico
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 6,428
Toppers are very nice if you happen to have a couple of canine travel companions!

Lynn
__________________
WBCCI 21043
eubank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2004, 07:22 PM   #4
Rivet Master
 
davidz71's Avatar
 
1986 25' Sovereign
Southern Middle , Tennessee
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 3,150
Images: 23
How about the ARE or LEER hard bed covers? You can open them from the rear without dropping the tailgate, can reach inside the bed for what you want and probably save some gas mileage by not having an exposed bed.
__________________
Craig

AIR #0078
'01 2500hd ext. cab, 8.1 litre gas, 5 sp. Allison auto
3.73 rear end
Mag-Hytec rear diff cover
Amsoil Dual by-pass oil filtration system
Amsoil synthetics all around
265 watt AM Solar, Inc. system
davidz71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2004, 07:41 AM   #5
4 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 304
Images: 7
Truck cover

We have a ARE hard bed cover on our 03 Silverado. It has steel rods that activate the inside releases instead of cables. Therefore, a wire can't be used between the bed and tailgate to open the cover when it is locked.
Fits and matches perfect.
Dan
__________________
Dbraw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2004, 08:37 AM   #6
Rivet Master
 
RivetED's Avatar
 
2017 26' Flying Cloud
North Central , USA
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 661
We had fiberglass covers on our last two pick-ups. Most of the advantages & disadv's have been pointed out here. This time I tried a large in-bed diamond-plate box at first, but it was just too small. We now have a 'Mountain Top' diamond plate aluminum cover. It comes off easily compared to fiberglass, it's lighter (somewhat), & you can carry up to 250 lbs. on it while traveling. It has a 360 degree rail around the top for securing cargo. Besides, it looks great with an Airstream in tow and doesn't need wax!
www.mounttop.com
__________________
RivetED is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2004, 08:48 AM   #7
Rivet Master
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 1,313
Images: 4
I was initially attracted to a topper, mainly for aesthetics, but I eventually went for the open bed with truck boxes. I'm now very glad I did. The open back is great for stowing a 32 gallon gray/black water tote in the open air, and for throwing in a sopping wet outside carpet when breaking camp after wet weather. We carry a 19ft tandem kayak on a truck rack, and I can secure it to the rack while standing in the truck bed. I have a system for getting it on and off easily single-handed.I got the usual cross box for tools, spares, spare fuel, etc, with a space underneath for long stuff in the bed. I'm next getting a side box for the kayak split paddles, PFDs, spray covers, emergency gear, etc. I padlock the kayak, blue tote and kayak trolley to the truck with an armoured cable. One of the problems I foresaw with the topper was stopping the stuff from moving around in transit. The bolted down and locked boxes solve that issue.It works for me. Nick.
__________________
Nick Crowhurst, Excella 25 1988, Dodge Ram 2500 Cummins Diesel. England in summer, USA in winter.
"The price of freedom is eternal maintenance."
nickcrowhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2004, 10:03 AM   #8
Rivet Master
 
Cracker's Avatar
 
Currently Looking...
Pittsfield , Maine
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 1,099
Truck Boxes

I think that Nick has probably stated several of my arguments in favor of the truck boxes. The overhead rack is also of interest - but yet another argument in favor of the boxes is the ability to carry my Honda scooter. Additionally, I would like to have a small generator, such as the Honda 2000 or the larger new Yamaha. The open bed would allow me to run it without lifting it out of the truck. I also am more comfortable with storing a couple of jerry cans for gas in the open bed. At this point I'm probably leaning towards the truck boxes. One additional question for Nick --- does the overhead rack require the crossbed box to be shifted towards the rear slightly to clear the forward posts? The scooter is fairly lengthy.
__________________
Cracker

2003 GMC 3500 D/A, CC, LB, 4x4 and 2000 Airstream Excella 30. WBCCI 7074
Cracker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2004, 09:52 AM   #9
Rivet Master
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 1,313
Images: 4
Cracker, the box has to come back about 5 inches to clear the front supports. You could keep the box right forward if you put the front rack supports behind the box. It depends on how long you need the rack to be. For a 19 foot kayak I needed as long a rack as possible. Mine is a Mirage Truck Rack, telephone 802 878 1023. It cost $299, and will carry 300 pounds. I use diagonal wires with tensioners to stiffen the framework. To load the kayak I remove the back bar of the rack, lower the tailgate. and slide the kayak forward and up onto the front bar until it is balanced onto the cab. Then I replace the back bar, and slide the kayak back. Then I flip it over to carry it upside down. The inside face of the top of the tailgate is fitted with a slab of low friction plastic (like PTFE) to facilitate sliding the kayak. Good luck. Nick.
__________________

__________________
Nick Crowhurst, Excella 25 1988, Dodge Ram 2500 Cummins Diesel. England in summer, USA in winter.
"The price of freedom is eternal maintenance."
nickcrowhurst is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:05 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.