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Old 03-14-2016, 10:35 AM   #29
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Bruce B:

Here is the link to the Ram site where you can download the expanded operators manual for your truck. It outlines the procedure(s) for initial WDH setup for air suspension on 1500 and 2500 and subsequent hitching up. It starts on page 696 (the manual is over 900 pages long). Again, there are separte formulas for initial WDH setup for air suspension on 1500 and 2500. The 1500 is fairly well explained, they lack detail on the 2500. Assumption is, and makes since to me, understand how the 1500 is setup and do the same for the 2500 but use the for formula for the 2500 for initial setup. Good luck and if you have any questions send me a message.

http://www.ramtrucks.com/en/owners/manuals/
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Old 03-14-2016, 10:46 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by Bruce B View Post
...

It is the "properly set up" part that is so difficult. There is enough information out there now that any mechanically savvy person stands a chance on getting close... I've also seen obviously unsafe situations where the person towing seemed oblivious to the problem. I simply give them a lot of distance and wish them well.

One of the things I really dislike about forums is the negativity that seems to happen on some subjects and tow vehicles is one of them. I respect that people all have differing realities and needs. I'm just glad that I found the chutzpah to order such a large truck. It is awesome and we are loving it.

Hope you all enjoy yours too!

Bruce
Thanks for saying this. I can't agree more. I also agree with your take that there are many great TVs out there and if properly matched and set up, they will perform nicely. I really believe in the "properly" set up argument. I have a Tundra and I really like it but it would not be the correct choice for all situations. If I had something larger, if I traveled with more than just us two, if I carried a lot in the bed, then it would not be "properly" set up or even "matched". If (when) I get a larger Airstream I will have to go through the whole process that you have experienced. I appreciate your post.

Best wishes
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Old 03-14-2016, 01:49 PM   #31
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Bruce B:

Here is the link to the Ram site where you can download the expanded operators manual for your truck. It outlines the procedure(s) for initial WDH setup for air suspension on 1500 and 2500 and subsequent hitching up. It starts on page 696 (the manual is over 900 pages long). Again, there are separte formulas for initial WDH setup for air suspension on 1500 and 2500. The 1500 is fairly well explained, they lack detail on the 2500. Assumption is, and makes since to me, understand how the 1500 is setup and do the same for the 2500 but use the for formula for the 2500 for initial setup. Good luck and if you have any questions send me a message.

http://www.ramtrucks.com/en/owners/manuals/
Ok
I've read this about 20 times over the past week.
What is bothering me is that in the setup of he 1500 there is mention of placing the suspension in the jack mode. This prevents the suspension from attempting to level as you apply load to the hitch's spring bars...

The paragraph on the 2500 has no mention of this and when I tried adjusting the bars without having the truck in the jack mode, predictably it leveled with application of pressure this throwing off all of my measurements.

I ended up using the jack mode anyway and it all set up seemingly perfectly.
Bruce
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Old 03-14-2016, 03:36 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Bruce B View Post
Ok
I've read this about 20 times over the past week.
What is bothering me is that in the setup of he 1500 there is mention of placing the suspension in the jack mode. This prevents the suspension from attempting to level as you apply load to the hitch's spring bars...

The paragraph on the 2500 has no mention of this and when I tried adjusting the bars without having the truck in the jack mode, predictably it leveled with application of pressure this throwing off all of my measurements.

I ended up using the jack mode anyway and it all set up seemingly perfectly.
Bruce
Yep, I told you the 2500 instructions were vague:-) thus use the 1500 instructions and the 2500 formula for setting up your WDH and you should be good. I know, they made this so confusing and if you had never owned a 1500 with air suspension before, you would go nuts trying to figure it out. So, everything good now?
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Old 03-14-2016, 03:40 PM   #33
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Diesel best practices

Bruce B:

Sorry Bruce, this is a long one and may be too long as to be in a thread.

Since you are relatively new to modern diesels (EPA required EGR cooler/valves, DEF systems, SCR, DPF etc), and the manuals talk about these things, sort of, here is some advice that most long term diesel owner know, will/have experienced and learned from them. First, modern diesel technology is nothing more than a marvel and all the manufactures make incredible motors and with a couple of issues that are unique to all brands, they are rock solid. The issues started around 2007/2008 and then 2010/2011 when all the manufacturers had to comply with far beyond even the Euro emission standards for the clean air act. Modern diesels when driving through big cities pretty much clean their air up when passing through.. Trouble is the pollution devices on modern diesels are their Achilles heal. And they all have the same issues. Problem is they are all problematic, expensive and time consuming to fix. They all have a life span for them but depending on how you drive your diesel and your preventative maintenance (or lack there of) will aggressively accelerate these high cost maintenance needs (and I am not exaggerating one bit here). There are other must do best practices to be done than the ones I am listing, so hopefully you will learn from others and others here can pitch in.

1- only at last resort do you put any kind of bio-diesel in your truck. If you have to, no greater than 10%. Bio has a shelf life of only 6 months. But the biggest issue is how much it will accelerate the demise of your EGR valve and cooler. This is compounded if you live in cold weather and/or do a lot of just short errand driving. Can't stress this enough. In extreme cold it can actually cause clogging of your fuel filters. I live in Michigan and can attest to this learned issue, over and over again.

2- Diesels require three things to run properly. They are not like gas engines where you can push these limits, diesels, just don't go there. They want lots of clean air, clean oil and absolutely super filtered clean fuel and water blows your motor up.

3- Oil changes: don't go a mile further than manufacture specs., period. Also, and I believe the Ram manual covers this one' full synthetic oils will NOT allow you to extend oil change intervals, as you can do in a gas engine. Reason is, gas and diesel oils push pass the rings into the engine oil pan and thus mix with the engine oil after time. Gas evaporates easily and eventually escapes the engine oil. Diesel oil does not evaporate and it stays mixed with the engine oil. Thus, overtime enough diesel oil mixes with the engine oil and your lubrication of critical engine parts become compromised (excessive engine wear). Air filter changes: self explanatory, but again more critical than gas engines. Fuel Filters: an absolute must to change per specs and don't cheap out on after market bargain stuff. Must be at least 3 microns and dual purpose for water separation. If you don't manage this item well, the injectors on these motors with replacement cost is about the same as a gas engine total rebuild. If you don't do your own fuel filters (two of them ) make sure you take to car wash and spray them clean before taking for service. If a piece of sand or glob of dirt falls into the open filter chamber, guaranteed injector destruction. About $800-1,000 a piece with labor.

4- after pulling your trailer, especially in hot weather and big hills, let your engine do a cool down for a couple of minutes before shutting off. It's not the engine you are really trying to cool down, it's the turbo. The turbo can literally get red hot in these conditions. The bearings in the turbo are cooled by engine oil. Let the engine oil run through it a couple of minutes to cool the bearing down. If not, you can significantly reduce the life of the turbo or ruin it. If you think an injector cost a lot, a diesel turbo cost like a new gas engine.

5- excessive engine idle. In the old days when the truckers use to sleep all night while they left their diesels running all night. Notice they don't do that anymore? Nor should you. You should not allow, especially a cold/cool engine, for more than 10 minutes, 15 minutes max. And this interval should be minimized as much as possible. It is not really an engine issue, doing this in cold weather causes moisture build up in engine oil, but the real issue is it severally clogs your EGR valve and cooler. Also using your diesel for just running frequent short errands, not allowing the engine to fully warm up, has the same effect. This is, in my opinion, the number one pain in the rear with modern diesels. They eventually clog, expensive, but accelerating it can be very harmful to your motor. A clogged EGR cooler can fail and thus permitting engine coolant to enter into your engine, in some instances. Kaboom, been there on this one on a 6.0 Powerstroke. Moral of the story, your new truck is not good as a grocery store picker upper. It wants to run hot, for long times and pull pull pull. The reason these commercial guys pulling RV deliveries get a zillion miles with out any issues, they are hauling heavy loads and never cooling down. A gas engine killer a Diesel engines glory.

6- DEF, urine with out smell:-) DEF, though it's easy and little hassle to keep operational it can still be a pain, especially when the pump fails or crystals form in your DEF tank messing up your tank sensors. An invention between the collaboration of Mercedes, VW and Audi (BluTech) is one of the emission requirements I believe is an effective pollution solution. But, it can be problematic and here is a couple of tips. DEF freezes at 23F, so in winter never over fill / top off your DEF tank, it could rupture. It needs room for freeze expansion. If you ever spill DEF on your paint, get it off with water to protect surface. If you spill on the ground, after you come back after it dries, you will notice it crystallizes a lot. This also can occur in your DEF tank if you run your DEF too low for long periods of time. The crystals can mess up your tank fluid level mechanism and other sensors. So, when the tank gets just below half full, fill it back up.

7- when your Ram tells you your Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) is nearing clogged and says hit the highway for 45 minutes to burn it out, do it. Not doing so can get you into a non reversible situation. These things cost many 1,000s of bucks. Plus, not doing so the truck will go into limp mode, not a good situation and all preventable. Just do what it says. If you drive high ways all the time, you may never see this warning.

8- idiot lights: Oh, how I have ignored idiot lights on gas engines. When you get idiot lights of exhaust issues, fuel or water. Stop, get out your manual and lookup the issue. Some of these can be very critical money issues if you ignore.

So, way too much I am sure but going on my 4th diesel I have learned a lot from worse case disasters, many preventable. Take care of her and she will reciprocate.
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Old 03-14-2016, 03:46 PM   #34
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That is why they make more than one brand. I am a little unsure, but I believe you might have just enough to pull that 16 footer.
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Old 03-14-2016, 04:27 PM   #35
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I only drive my 2015 Ram CTD once a week to work. Work is about 15 miles one way with the majority of the route on the highway at 60mph. Once the season starts I tow to a local campground within 60 miles at least one weekend per month. I'm planning a long trip to Montana in August. I only have 2100 miles since purchasing last August. So far I have only used #2 diesel. I keep the tank at least 1/2 full. The DEF gauge only shows about 1/3 used.

I suspect I will be forced to use biodiesel traveling to Montana via Nebraska and Wyoming.

What is the best maintenance? Change the oil every 6 months and change the fuel filters every other oil change?

Kelvin
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Old 03-14-2016, 05:20 PM   #36
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JRRitcie:

The newer Ram Cummins have 15,000 mile oil change and fuel filter(s) intervals, under normal conditions. I believe they recommend 12,000 miles if hauling heavy a lot and/or lots of dust. There are oil and filter reset modes on the Rams and it will notify you when you are coming up on them.. They take into account these conditions some how but note NEVER to exceed the 15K max.. Remember to reset the oil and fuel filters back to 100% after you change them. Some Ram models the EVICs between the tach and speedo you can customize the digital instruments and display gauges for the life of your fuel filters and oil.

If your truck has sat for that length of time, 6 months, especially through winter I would have the oil changes before heading out. Guarantee some water condensation has accumulated in your oil pan.

Being forced to use bio while towing is far far less of an issue than winter/cold start stops. A little here and there under your conditions not an issue.

My Powerstroke 6.7 was bio-20 approved. I am pretty darn sure Cummins in the non commercial trucks (2500-3500) are not B20 approved and Ram warns against it. Only their commercial trucks are setup to take B20. Just because Ford says they are B20 and Ram B10, does not mean you should make any kind of habit doing it. Only when you don't have an option. Also semi truck stops. No bio going into those puppies.
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Old 03-14-2016, 07:17 PM   #37
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Why a truck at all, is a better question.
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Old 03-14-2016, 07:26 PM   #38
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Why a truck at all, is a better question.
Just curious... Did you read my original post? Your question's answer is there
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Old 03-14-2016, 08:08 PM   #39
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Why a truck at all, is a better question.
Why get married, why have kids? Because you love them :-) it does not have to make since. But I will tell you, when driving the majority of your Spring-Summer on two lane roads throughout Montana, Idaho, Wyoming pulling a very loaded pickup bed and Airstream....and you want to relax and feel confident you can take on anything, try a modern 3/4 ton diesel. Once you have oil in your blood you can't live without it :-)
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Old 03-14-2016, 08:25 PM   #40
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Why a truck at all, is a better question.

Hey Slow.

Your profile says you haul that vintage kin of yours with a 3/4 ton pickup. Did you change out and if so - to what and why?

I thought Bruce provided a pretty thorough explanation up front.
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Old 03-15-2016, 07:30 AM   #41
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Plan-B did a nice job of summarizing some of the pitfalls of a modern diesel emission systems.
I installed an extra Mopar factory fuel/water seperator on my truck so it can better handle the bio-fuels encountered along the interstate. This is the same filter system used on the cab-chassis models.
Even with the emission headaches I would have a tough time selling my Dodge diesel. I would buy another but it would be a 2013 or newer with the DEF system. As Plan-B said above, I am careful in the amount of idle time and slow driving. I have yet to have the trucks computer tell me that I must go on a long drive to complete a regeneration process.
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Old 03-15-2016, 08:03 AM   #42
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Why a truck at all, is a better question.
Read the first post, then ask your question.
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