Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-27-2009, 09:51 AM   #57
3 Rivet Member
 
1971 25' Caravanner
scappoose , Oregon
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 197
Know exactly how you feel. With my old '80 Chev 3/4, 4x4, I felt that I could do anything needed to keep it going.
It was a real piece of "machinery", with levers, and linkages for controls. Under the hood, their did'nt seem to be enough wires for it to run, and their was all this space around the engine, which made it possible to actually "see and work", on anything.
Off road, it was just as capable as anything today, and with a manual trans, and duel batteries, I had much more trust in it, when I was miles, and miles from nowhere.
__________________

__________________
rangebowdrie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2009, 09:22 PM   #58
2 Rivet Member
 
2001 30' Classic S/O
2001 36' Land Yacht XC Diesel 300 hp w/slide
Helotes , Texas
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 91
Vintage Tow Vehicle

If you want to spend some bucks in order to have a classic tow truck, there are numerous shops that can graft a front sub frame from say a 80's Buick Regal along with the rear end, add a late model V8 with automatic transmission after market a/c. We have a 1948 Cadillac with the above done, comfortable/dependable and classic
__________________

__________________
lsmith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2009, 12:32 PM   #59
Rivet Master
 
hampstead38's Avatar
 
1967 26' Overlander
Upperco , Maryland
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,087
Blog Entries: 22
There are numerous improvements that can effectively make a vintage truck into a modern truck... IFS, disc brakes, power steering, etc. I wouldn't mind building a class truck with modern running gear for fun, but there's something wonderful about an old truck that is really an old truck.
hampstead38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2009, 02:57 PM   #60
Rivet Master
 
hampstead38's Avatar
 
1967 26' Overlander
Upperco , Maryland
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,087
Blog Entries: 22
I must have writtent the above post on a good day. There are certainly days when owning a vintage truck challenges the spirit... and the wallet.
hampstead38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2009, 03:33 PM   #61
Iwannagocamping
 
Dakota's Dad's Avatar
 
1979 31' Sovereign
Rineyville , Kentucky
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 262
Or, you wrote the ABOVE post on a bad day..lol
__________________
See our blog here on how two RV/AS rookies tackle a 1979 Sovereign resto!!

Just the photos.. (sometimes you don't need the blog, just a picture worth a thousand words..)

1979 Sovereign International
2004 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer
2 Golden Retrievers

Air #36788
TAC#3179
WBCCI #1265
Dakota's Dad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2009, 03:47 PM   #62
Rivet Master
 
hampstead38's Avatar
 
1967 26' Overlander
Upperco , Maryland
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,087
Blog Entries: 22
I think it's a Dodge/Mopar thing. I could build a complete '66/'67 Chevy or Ford out of after-market parts catalogues. Finding parts for an old "Dog" is challenging... and the 60s era trucks have a well deserved reputation for rust... as I am finding out. As with any restoration--vintage truck or vintage Airstream--there good and bad days. On a good day, I feel like we're doing something really fun. On a not-so-good day, I feel like I'm the first mate on a ship of fools.
hampstead38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2009, 01:42 PM   #63
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,857
Quote:
Originally Posted by hampstead38 View Post
On a good day, I feel like we're doing something really fun. On a not-so-good day, I feel like I'm the first mate on a ship of fools.
Reminds me of owning a recent model Airstream with QC issues.

How far along are you with the Dodge? Restoring a vintage Dodge and an Airstream in a relatively short period of time makes me fear for your sanity—if not now, certainly a year or two down the road (or driveway).

Gene
__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2009, 05:05 PM   #64
Iwannagocamping
 
Dakota's Dad's Avatar
 
1979 31' Sovereign
Rineyville , Kentucky
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 262
LOL, feel your pain.. proud owner of a 1948 Buick Super Eight. Parts are, well, rare.
__________________
See our blog here on how two RV/AS rookies tackle a 1979 Sovereign resto!!

Just the photos.. (sometimes you don't need the blog, just a picture worth a thousand words..)

1979 Sovereign International
2004 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer
2 Golden Retrievers

Air #36788
TAC#3179
WBCCI #1265
Dakota's Dad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2009, 05:14 PM   #65
Rivet Master
 
hampstead38's Avatar
 
1967 26' Overlander
Upperco , Maryland
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,087
Blog Entries: 22
The Dodge runs. I probably can't save the bed so I'm looking for a utility body. I made an offer on an aluminum body on eBay, but I think the guy wants a little too much for the bed in its current condition.

The major problem on the renovation is that I lack garage/shop space to do anything. My microshop is full of Airstream parts and "driveway mechanicking" has its limitations, particularly in winter.

I need to pull the bed... and then lift the cab to install new cab mounts. Of course, I also need to repair the floor pans and some metal separations. The doors are probably shot, but I may have to save them anyway. I'm shopping for an engine to rebuild during the winter months so I can swap in a new motor in the spring. Much like any project, Gene, I'm not sure it will ever be done... but it may be "good enough" come July 2011 to pull the Overlander out of Maryland. If not... well, there's always the modern truck backup plan.

I think the biggest challenge is getting the old truck comfortable enough for my wife (and honestly, me). It's hellishly noisy, smells like engine and the bench seat could double as a torture device. Getting the truck "right" means chasing down the squeaks, squeals, rattles, clatters, hisses and whistles... all of them. Even rolling off the assembly line, the old Dodge trucks were noisy... but I'm not going to convince my wife to ride shotgun unless the cab is somewhat habitable.
hampstead38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2009, 05:54 PM   #66
2 Rivet Member
 
cork , munster
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 22
Hi lads, how you doing
Know the feeling well, slowly working on an old mercedes myself, i know it'll never be finished properly but like you all said at least it's possible to work on these older motors without a degree in electronics, and also the vintage motors sure do look the 'red setters rude bits' compared to modern
Good luck
Pete
__________________
irshmerc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2009, 05:59 PM   #67
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,857
How cold can it get in Md.? My introduction to a Colorado winter 31 years ago was fixing the exhaust system on a Jeep at -28˚. Have you gotten soft since you left Montana?

I've given you enough grief. I don't see how you can do the Airstream and the Dodge and not quit your job, but you certainly know what you can do. Will your wife work on one while you work on the other? When does the trailer come home?

Gene
__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-19-2009, 10:09 PM   #68
Rivet Master
 
hampstead38's Avatar
 
1967 26' Overlander
Upperco , Maryland
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,087
Blog Entries: 22
There's no doubt I'm softer, Gene, at least through the midsection. I can remember doing u-joints at around -20... but honestly, I'd rather have the hard cold than doing the backstroke through slush at around 30 to 35 degrees. I hate slush.

As for the Airstream and the Dodge... who knows. My lovely bride and I still have around 20 months until D-Day when my contract ends and we're planning to head west. Comparing to the challenge of selling our house in this economy, the Dodge and the Airstream seem easy.

In a "worst case scenario," we could tow the unfinished Airstream to Montana, put it under roof and finish it off while living in the comfort of the family ranch. Honestly, I'm not sure "Ed" is worth towing all the way to Big Sky Country, but I'll bet a wooden nickel I could coax the old beast out there and let my wife tow the Overlander in style. If "Ed" was really unworkable, he'd go into storage out west and we'd do our "hiatus" in a modern truck.

Life, my friend, is what happens when you're busy making other plans.
hampstead38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2009, 07:54 AM   #69
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,857
I hate slush too. Dry cold is a lot better, though I never want to fix anything at -28˚ again.

Your plan makes as much sense as anything and I know you are very realistic.

Gene
__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2009, 08:35 AM   #70
Rivet Master
 
hampstead38's Avatar
 
1967 26' Overlander
Upperco , Maryland
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,087
Blog Entries: 22
Some would say realistic... others might say negative.

I'm still sold on the utility body concept, Gene. I'm also committed to some other modifications I can make on "Ed" but not so easily on a modern truck. I'd like a 40+ gallon gas tank that fills from both sides. I'd like a flashing yellow light over the cab for towing in bad conditions. There are some other odds and ends as well.

There are some amazing advances in sound dampening technology. The market for high end stereo systems has created something of a cult of sound/noise control. The old trucks were simply utilitarian, but there's enough room to make serious modifications. I'm not sure the truck will ever be quiet... but the goal is to get it to the point where we could have a conversation with shouting.

I agree on the dry cold. My parents visited Maryland in the dead of winter and nearly froze. It was the humidity... just no tolerance for it.

Oh, one more thing since I'm spinning a bit of yarn this morning. I came to Maryland in a little Toyota truck pulling a utility trailer. I started in Spokane, Washington and ended in Tilghman Island. The Toyota was a little "four-banger" that was loaded to the gunnels. I had my entire life's possessions in the bed and in the utility trailer. It's a bit ironic that I'll be leaving Maryland in much the same way, "heavy one wife" as they might say at NASA.
__________________

hampstead38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Vintage vs. Modern? robertpeters Our Community 45 09-28-2010 03:24 PM
vintage vs. modern towing pilgrimjohn Towing, Tow Vehicles & Hitches 3 05-13-2009 07:11 PM
Modern v. Vintage Trailer for first Airstream?? Becasse Airstream Trailer Forums 22 01-11-2009 06:23 PM
Big 3 1/2 Ton vs 3/4 Ton Trucks Streamer1 Tow Vehicles 40 11-20-2007 11:13 PM
Modern building materials in vintage restorations bredlo General Interior Topics 18 12-05-2003 08:16 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.