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Old 05-27-2015, 12:26 PM   #29
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One more factor in our decision (post 26, above) is that our travels usually include western states where going up, down, and through the Sierra Nevada, Rocky Mountain, and Pacific Coast mountain ranges is often done. Here is where the extra grunt of the Duramax, and the extra stopping power of the diesel exhaust brake are especially appreciated when towing the 30' Airstream.
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Old 05-27-2015, 04:40 PM   #30
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I have a 1500 Z71 , If it were a choice, go with the 2500.. You wont regret it.
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Old 05-27-2015, 08:20 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by ckottum View Post
Well, many will tell you axle and tire ratings are more important than payload ratings.

Nonetheless it is important to know how to accurately measure added payload as mentioned in my post above if that is your criteria. And to realize Airstream hitch weight can be modified as long as it is at least 10% of loaded trailer weight.

And to realize some will pick the criteria and weighing methods that fit the truck they prefer to buy. Whether it's too light a truck or too heavy a truck doesn't matter.

cheryl
Cheryl has taken the discussion to the crux of the matter or should I say the crux of the WD hitch.

Cargo capacity is intended as a guideline for limiting the combination of cargo + passengers.

To decide if a given TV is overloaded by cargo+passenger+AS tongue weight you must pull the AS to the truck scales with WD hitch employed and weigh your rig.

The WD hitch will redistribute 1/3 of tongue weight to the AS axles and the remaining 2/3 tongue wt will be evenly distributed over the TV front & rear axles. This concept of redistribution of tongue weight with a WD hitch is clearly outlined in your AS manual. In my AS manual its under the Towing section pg7-5.

It is through the hitch's ability to redistribute AS tongue weight that the final tongue weight reaches the magical 10-11% of AS total weight. My AS dry wt is 5500# x 10% equals my weight distributed tongue wt of 550#.

Weigh the load on the TV front axle and rear axles to insure that both axle and tire ratings are not being exceeded. In general, with a properly setup WD hitch, many 1/2 ton pickups will pull a properly loaded 25-30 ft. AS with ease/comfort and never exceed the trucks weight/towing guidelines. You will have to pinch yourself periodically to remind yourself that you're actually pulling your AS.

My AS has an unloaded tongue weight of 837# but only 2/3 of this weight is passed evenly to the TV Front and rear axles. The WD hitch reduces the weight on my TV to 552# which is the magical 10% of total AS wt.

Without a WD hitch some 1/2 ton pickups would become over loaded or nearly overloaded when pulling a 25-30 AS.

Some will feel under gunned by towing an AS with anything less than a 3/4 ton truck but I like the economy, comfort ,value and ease of towing our 25FB with our Toyota Tundra. You have to pinch yourself as a reminder that the AS is following behind.

Spend a lot of time and several outings setting up your WD hitch and insure that both the TV and AS are towing level to give you a comfortable and secure ride.

Greg
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Old 05-27-2015, 09:36 PM   #32
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All the 'goodies' added to the TV lower the payload capacity. Look at DHart's truck and mine. He has a Denali, , longer bed, bigger engine and many more options than my Silverado 1500 with the smaller engine and the payload difference is less than 200 lbs. but I'm sure he can pull several thousand lbs. more than I can.
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Old 05-27-2015, 09:45 PM   #33
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I added the pdf attachment after you responded....scroll down to payload page.
I stand corrected. My sticker says never exceed 3097
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Old 05-27-2015, 09:55 PM   #34
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I stand corrected. My sticker says never exceed 3097

That sounds more like it!



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Old 05-27-2015, 10:07 PM   #35
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I'm really enjoying the feedback. I'll do the weight calc's with my WD figured in. I'm leaning towards the 1500 for now, but have not ruled out the 2500.
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Old 05-27-2015, 10:39 PM   #36
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All the 'goodies' added to the TV lower the payload capacity. Look at DHart's truck and mine. He has a Denali, , longer bed, bigger engine and many more options than my Silverado 1500 with the smaller engine and the payload difference is less than 200 lbs. but I'm sure he can pull several thousand lbs. more than I can.
Craig... excellent point. If one prefers a "loaded" model with all the goodies and options, the 1/2 ton loses a critical margin of payload capacity. But if going with a more basic model without a lot of options, the payload on the 1/2 ton may be enough.

We wanted the maxed-out luxury version, which gobbles up some available cargo capacity, so going with the 3/4 ton Duramax was a no brainer for us.

There are a lot of variables to be considered, not just a couple of simple measurements.

One must also consider that some people will not have the ability to make all the weight measurements with a WD hitch BEFORE buying either the TV or the TT. In our case, we wanted to go on the side of greater capability because we were buying our truck before having the AS and had no option to fiddle around with WD hitches and scales before making a decision.

Depending on one's individual set of parameters, there are obviously a variety of ways to go. THe prudent person would err on the side of caution, however, as safety is probably the most important element to consider.
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Old 05-27-2015, 11:37 PM   #37
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Safety and heavy duty trucks do not go hand in hand. There are safer choices. The advantage of a heavy duty truck is ability to carry heavier loads and more powerful engine choices, it ends there. Some Airstreamers need this advantage, some don't, some think they do. No easy answer.

A point to consider here is a bigger truck is not necessarily a safer truck. It's not that easy. It feels safer but handles poorly, needs to brake another 2000 lbs of itself on four tires, more likely to roll over in a sharp turn, and its own weight is more likely to harm the passengers if it does.

There is a considerable void between these choices of light or heavy duty truck. That space between is where most Airstreamers find themselves and much of the reason for argument, too big or too small.

The truck makers are building trucks that are aimed for the guy who wants a truck but likes the soft suspension and tires of cars. Or the working guy who needs to haul 3000 lbs or tow 17000 lbs. Most Airstreams don't match well with either one. So we adapt as best we can and argue endlessly about it. Maybe this new Silverado is one of a new segment that better suits our Airstream needs.

cheryl
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Old 05-28-2015, 12:31 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by Skee75 View Post
I'm really enjoying the feedback. I'll do the weight calc's with my WD figured in. I'm leaning towards the 1500 for now, but have not ruled out the 2500.
When I was looking into the 2015 GM1500 I noticed that when you got the 6.2 with the NHT ( max tow) you got the 3.42 gears and 7600lb GVW.
My 08 6L max tow is only 7200 and it's plenty for our 25FB, so personally I would stick with the 1500 as it would be our daily driver.


George
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Old 05-28-2015, 12:33 AM   #39
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Safety and heavy duty trucks do not go hand in hand. There are safer choices.

cheryl
Safety is many things, cheryl. There is nothing inherently unsafe about a heavy duty truck. Ya know, vehicles are a lot like guns, in this regard. Safety is primarily found in the brain and the skills of the operator. There are great, skilled operators and there are a lot of lame-brained operators, as well. How an individual operates the vehicle in a preventive and defensive manner is the #1 safety factor, by a wide margin. And when the SHTF, how that individual responds is, again, the major factor in safety. You can't buy your way to safety with ANY choice of vehicles.

Safety is also a matter of keeping weights comfortably within specified capacities and having stopping power that is better than marginal. Handling is another factor. Though I believe that having a TV which is heavier is likely better than having one which is lighter, in terms of resisting the "tail wagging the dog". Arguments can go back and forth, depending on one's particular slant, of course.

There are a plethora of factors for anyone to consider when choosing a TV. And no single solution that is perfect choice in every way. As with everything else in life, there are compromises to every choice.

A 1/2 ton pickup could very well be the best option for some individuals with smaller, lighter Airstreams, like yours, and minimal cargo needs. A 3/4 ton diesel pickup may well be the best option for individuals with full length, heavier Airstreams, like the 30' Internationals and Classics, those with heavier cargo needs, those who travel through the Rockies, Sierra Nevada, Pacific Coast ranges, etc. And of course, those are both IMperfect choices. (There are no perfect choices in anything.) Thus, those are not hard and fast rules, as there are so many other factors that the individual needs to consider, depending on their needs and preferences.

For us, the 3/4 ton is the safest and best choice for our needs and preferences. The 1/2 ton trucks would not meet all of our needs with regard to cargo capacity and other factors, so we went with 3/4 ton diesel. But that's not a prescription for you and your situation, nor for anyone else. There is no right nor wrong answer to the general question of what TV is "best" for any individual. Just as you and I have done, that person needs to learn the important factors and then do their own research into the potential options that meet their needs. And then, make their own choice.... not your choice, not my choice... just what works for their individual situation.
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Old 05-28-2015, 09:41 AM   #40
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I have a 2014 Chevy 1500 Silverado extended cab with the 5.3 engine and 3.73 rear end and no tow package. I love it. I pull on the ball for 2 years and 12,000 miles of towing. Last year we did the N/W with no trouble. I made a mistake and took Hwy 22 straight west out of Jackson, WY. Had to pull 10 miles or more at 7 to 8% grades (and the same down). I had to "back out of it a little" to keep the transmission cool, but it did the job very well. No I did not go up that grade at 70 MPH, but I will never take a road like that again. This truck will pull long 6% grades at about 50 MPH with no transmission temp gain. I do not use the "tow haul" option. I am all for fuel mileage and long engine life (like low RPM's).
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Old 05-29-2015, 02:55 PM   #41
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I have the 2014 Chevy LTZ Crew Cab, with tow pkg. Went on a 2 month trip MO,WY,CO, NM, TX, OK, SD 6,000 towing miles, last summer. Ave. 13.5 mpg loaded, 23 hwy unloaded. Now I have 30,000 about 1/3 is towing miles... I love this truck
Never needed to use that much RPM like the video... And you will pass others going up the hill. LOL
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Old 06-07-2015, 07:23 PM   #42
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2015 GMC Sierra update

Hi Folks
we just got back from a weekend trip up the Ottawa Valley which is good roads in hilly country. We were two adults and two grandkids and one large Golden Reteiver. Plus all the stuff that we seem to NEED with us!
here are the numbers on the 6.2 with the eight speed, loaded up as previously described.
2,056 miles total on odometer
trip was 227.3 miles
average on the computer showed 9.0 M.P.G. over the trip
average to date is 15.0 M.P.G. (since new)
OR for those of us who muddle in Metric
3,309 KM total on the odometer
trip was 366 K.M.
average on the cpmputer showed 26.0 Ltrs per 100 K.M
Average to date is 15 Ltrs per 100 K.M. (since new)
From a performance point I am very pleased. I was running with the cruise on and it shifted well in the hills and did a reasonable job of downhill brake assist. The factory brake controller worked very well with excellent modulation or 'feel' once I had the gain set up where I needed it. No need for a 'will fit' controller. Nice and clean.
Again as I get more trips in the books I will report back on the 6.2 eight speed Max Tow.
Thanks
Pete
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