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Old 05-25-2017, 08:32 AM   #1
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Newer Models Ford F250 Gas Vs. F250 Diesel

What are the differences specifically to towing?
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Old 05-25-2017, 09:39 AM   #2
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I really don't think you'll find any significant difference. The gassers are very capable of towing these days. I have an F-350 diesel and love it. My daughter works for a rowing club in Connecticut and just yesterday they picked up a NEW F-350 gasser for the club. They regularly tow in the range of an 8-10k trailer with their crew shells and equipment but didn't feel the need for diesel. If my opinion is worth anything ( I like to think so ) I would say that the big reason for springing the $$$ for diesel is in the re-sale value. I think we will recover a good % of the initial layout plus have the peace of mind while towing with it. So far I have had no big repair bills ( 45k miles ) only scheduled servicing.
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Old 05-25-2017, 09:42 AM   #3
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Big difference in payload gasser has roughly 500 more lbs. Diesels beat gasses in torque and power not only going uphill but controlling speeds down hill. Gassers have 2 inch receivers and diesels 2 1/2 inch (3 inch on 2017). Diesels also need DEF fluid that has to be added.
You will find getting diesel pumps a bit easier with RV on tow, but finding diesel pumps is slightly more challenging.
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Old 05-25-2017, 10:16 AM   #4
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If it matters, the gas truck is going to burn 30 to 40 % more fuel while towing.
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Old 05-25-2017, 11:27 AM   #5
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Diesels pull great, but with a cost. Oil changes over $100, the need for DEF and the additional cost of the truck. Yesterday it cost me $100 to have the exhaust filter cleaned out on my 2016 truck.
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Old 05-26-2017, 04:37 AM   #6
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Both are very nice trucks. The gas engine is geared for its horsepower/torque curve and will turn faster to produce a given horsepower at the wheels.

Both gas and diesel are becoming very expensive to repair when things go wrong. Suspensions on HDs are not cheap to fix either but if you don't put lots of miles on you'll never see it.

Very nicely appointed inside, better than most really nice cars. Can't go wrong with either one.
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Old 05-26-2017, 04:54 AM   #7
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We just bought a 2015 F250 (XLT?) gasser since we are planning a trip from Virginia to Texas in December and because hubby just thought our Tahoe was wimpy overall for the 25' Safari. It's nice to know that both are great vehicles to tow with. Since there is a large price difference even with used diesels over the gassers, I was wondering about the towing differences and I appreciate all the answers so far.

I was expecting a bumpy, jerky ride and it was pretty smooth. That for me was the biggest surprise and the leg room in the back.
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Old 05-26-2017, 06:18 AM   #8
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I've towed our 2014 27 foot FB Airstream with both a gas and diesel version of a late model F-250. And while the gas model will certainly pull the trailer, there is a night and day difference which you might not appreciate if you haven't pulled with both types of trucks. The diesel engine does not rev as high when going up hills or accelerating so the passenger compartment is much quieter and the driving experience is more relaxed. On a flat road at speed, you will notice a slight decrease in cabin noise with the diesel but the biggest difference is up a grade and when accelerating. The biggest "plus" to the diesel is the engine brake. This is not just "gearing down" which is possible with a gas engine, but involves mechanically closing off some aspects of the engine's exhaust system which adds more drag to the drive train than can simply shifting down. This feature is simply not available on any gasoline engine, only on diesels (and not all diesels have this so you have to check.) I can go down an 8% grade forever with the engine brake and not have to touch the brake pedal at all. On a long decent this is a real plus.

Diesels cost more to buy and maintain than a gasoline engine and it's highly unlikely that you will recover the added cost through "better mileage" or sometimes cheaper diesel prices. But if you can afford it, the diesel will be a much more pleasant and possibly safer driving experience.
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Old 05-26-2017, 06:47 AM   #9
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I'm going with a gas engine on the F250. I want the added payload and do not want the added complexity of diesel. Do you really have to remove the entire cab to facilitate some repairs on the diesel??? I just can't get my head around that.
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Old 05-26-2017, 07:35 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Steamy1 View Post
Do you really have to remove the entire cab to facilitate some repairs on the diesel??? I just can't get my head around that.

Depends on which engine is in the ford. Since the 6.0L they seemed to start taking them off and with the 6.7L it's almost a must for many repairs. Do a search you even find videos showing how it's done.
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Old 05-26-2017, 02:34 PM   #11
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Depends on which engine is in the ford. Since the 6.0L they seemed to start taking them off and with the 6.7L it's almost a must for many repairs.
And I say no thanks to that.
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Old 05-26-2017, 03:50 PM   #12
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Crh,

I'm just relaying info. The cab on my '05 Dodge Cummins will never come off.

Gary
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Old 05-26-2017, 05:53 PM   #13
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I'm going with a gas engine on the F250. I want the added payload and do not want the added complexity of diesel. Do you really have to remove the entire cab to facilitate some repairs on the diesel??? I just can't get my head around that.
The cab has to come off with either one for some repairs. It's because the engine is further back on newer trucks.

Most people on here don't even hit 100,000 miles, if you need serious repairs before 200k you didn't take care of it properly.

Just went across the state in mine, with the new 75 mph speed limits it didn't miss a beat! Kept right up.
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Old 05-26-2017, 06:00 PM   #14
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Crh,

I'm just relaying info. The cab on my '05 Dodge Cummins will never come off.

Gary
That's because you have a six cylinder.
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Old 05-26-2017, 11:19 PM   #15
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We just bought a 2017 F250 Lariat 6.2 with 4.30 gears and it pulls our 25' Int'l great. Payload on the truck is 2900# so plenty of wiggle room.

Best advice I ever heard was get what you want and what you can responsibly afford. The maintenance on diesels is not that scary but does take more owner involvement than a gas motor. I feel like folks that are more like gear heads are better suited to the diesel in general because of a love of mechanical/ hands on stuff. The gas trucks are less involved and really just need oil and fuel then crank it and go.

The diesel resell argument is always interesting because no one talks about how that $8k cost upgrade will grow if you finance the truck for 60 mos. depending upon your APR. Case in point, 60 months at 4.9% will turn that $8k into about $9600. Moot point if you buy outright.

My previous TV was a 2012 F150 5.0 with 3.55 gears and I feel like the new truck is equal in ride quality and has more power.

From the engineering perspective, unless you are towing 10k or more fulltiming you really aren't going to be using the FULL potential of the diesel. That power does get additive though

If you've got questions about my setup then let me know. I really enjoy talking about trucks and spend a lot of time on the ford truck owners forums.

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Old 05-27-2017, 05:23 AM   #16
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You've Got to know what you're doing to fix either one these days. Too many guys break bolts or spark plugs using the wrong tools etc. I trust the guy with an older, high mileage truck with no rust and no leaks to fix mine.
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Old 05-27-2017, 05:56 PM   #17
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You're right countryboy, you do still have to know what you're doing. I think the two piece spark plug issue doesn't carry over to 2017 as ford resolved that a while ago.

I forgot to mention but even under load my gasser just isn't that loud when it's revving high. There's a good YouTube video of a 2017 f250 6.2 pulling 8k pounds and you really can't hear the engine that much but YMMV.

Overall I haven't felt stressed because of engine noise when towing with our truck.

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Old 05-27-2017, 08:40 PM   #18
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People used to want to hear engine noise. In fact, Ford puts fake engine noise in some vehicles. It is played thru the speakers. The Ecoboost F150 is one such vehicle.
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Old 05-30-2017, 05:11 AM   #19
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Newer Models Ford F250 Gas Vs. F250 Diesel

Engines have an operating range. Where it falls on the rpm scale is irrelevant. In a truck (a vehicle expected to do work) any engine will be set up for duty cycle appropriately.

The advent of 6,8, and 10-speed autos has negated any advantage of diesel in the latest pickups for anyone with trailers under 14k.

And, an exhaust brake is in no way necessary with these little trailers. In fact, use of such on a downgrade without TT brakes also activating creates a situation dangerous in itself.

Vulnerability to a loss of control situation is highest on a downgrade. The need for the lash-up to always be in tension (NOT in compression) is vital.

Proper speed and proper gear plus use of service brakes is what maintains control.

An engine or exhaust brake is not a substitute. It's an aid to the above.

In any situation involving slowing, the TT needs relatively more brake application than the TV
to maintain that tension.

An engine or exhaust brake is utilized when the service brakes CANNOT control the rig for a given speed.

On an eighteen wheeler the difference is a descent at 30-mph versus one at 12-15/mph.

That's not the situation with these TT. At all.

It's a fool who habitually uses an exhaust brake when towing these TTs without the TT brakes being applied simultaneously.

As to fuel mileage one must factor the increased truck price for a diesel, the fuel premium, and higher repair costs over the long term (200k miles).

With any TV the change from solo mpg to towing will be approximately 40% where all else is the same. Motor type doesn't change that. It's the aerodynamic problem.

The advantage of diesel is high cylinder pressure. Vehicle weight increases and Grade climbs are less of a burden (why the 1960s big block engines were great). And turbocharging means less power loss at altitude.

But, with an enormous increase in available gear choices and full digital engine control, pickup truck gasoline motors are barely off the diesel mark until weights are quite high (excepting half ton versions).

Folks today seem to have an inordinate fear of working a motor. They needn't. If anything, just order shorter rear gears. Will burn more fuel on the highway, but the motor will have an easy (sounding) time. Won't increase its life. These trailers just aren't a burden.
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Old 05-30-2017, 09:24 AM   #20
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Just a quick addition to the threat here....
https://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/1...-2-owners.html

Lot of good first hand accounts of guys who run the gasser truck and what they see with regard to mpg unloaded as well as towing.
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