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Old 01-28-2015, 07:20 AM   #15
CapriRacer
 
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A couple of thoughts:

1) Both the Europeans (ETRTO) and the Japanese (JATMA) omit the letters in front of their passenger car tires. They both have versions of LT tires, but they aren't consistent with the US practice in their marking of those types of tires.

2) As far back as I can remember, ALL the pickup manufacturers have been using P type tires on their 1/2 ton PU's. The use of LT tires on 1/2 tons is a relatively recent phenomenon (circa 2000).

3) While it is surprising to see Ford use a non-US tire sizing nomenclature, I wonder if this has anything to do with global integration. Vehicles are being designed all over the globe, and I wonder if the tires and wheel part was farmed out to a non-US location.
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Old 01-30-2015, 07:08 PM   #16
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2004 25' Safari
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Tire recommendation

I started out with a 17' Airstream so only got a 1/2 ton pickup. Later I got a 27' Airstream (actually 27' 11") and continued to pull it with the same 1/2 ton pickup. Without going into all the specifics, I wound up rolling the 27' Airstream a couple years later. I did not let the wife drive the truck pulling the 27 footer because I didn't feel it was safe for her to pull (even though it had all the right equipment, anti-sway, load levelers, etc.)

I subsequently purchased a 25' Airstream (with a different anti-sway system).

When it came time to replace tires on the truck I made what I consider to be a MONUMENTAL single improvement. I had been using the largest Michelin tires that would work for my 2005 Silverado. When I went to replace them I found that the 3/4 ton & 1-ton trucks use a different tire. Whereas the tires recommended for 1/2 ton trucks inflate at something like 44 psi maximum (don't remember exactly), the tires for the 3/4 & 1-ton pickups inflate to 80 psi maximum. I installed the higher pressure "Michelin LTX M/S 2, ALL SEASON, LT265/70R17 LRE ORWL, MSPN 97723" tires and could not believe the difference in towing. I believe that these tires may have made the difference in rolling or not rolling my previous 27' Airstream.

Everybody you ask gives you different recommendations on inflation pressures. I use the truck only when towing, so I settled in on 70 psi in the front, 75 psi in the rear, and 40 psi in the spare (obviously I didn't replace the spare).

I would still recommend a 3/4 ton truck if you go to the 27' (28') route, but if you are going to pull it with a 1/2 ton I definitely recommend you switch to higher pressure tires. They are costly (I think I paid about $1,300 for four tires), but they make a tremendous difference in towing safety.
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Old 01-31-2015, 09:39 AM   #17
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Windy', you switched from Load Range C to Load Range E tires. Michelin recommended with Load Range E LTX Tires on my half ton Tundra that 42 front and 45 rear was appropriate, and add 3 lbs. for towing. The E tires will take 80 lbs., but it is not necessary to make them that hard for the load.

Gene
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Old 01-31-2015, 10:35 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WindyJim View Post
I started out with a 17' Airstream so only got a 1/2 ton pickup. Later I got a 27' Airstream (actually 27' 11") and continued to pull it with the same 1/2 ton pickup. Without going into all the specifics, I wound up rolling the 27' Airstream a couple years later. I did not let the wife drive the truck pulling the 27 footer because I didn't feel it was safe for her to pull (even though it had all the right equipment, anti-sway, load levelers, etc.)

I subsequently purchased a 25' Airstream (with a different anti-sway system).

When it came time to replace tires on the truck I made what I consider to be a MONUMENTAL single improvement. I had been using the largest Michelin tires that would work for my 2005 Silverado. When I went to replace them I found that the 3/4 ton & 1-ton trucks use a different tire. Whereas the tires recommended for 1/2 ton trucks inflate at something like 44 psi maximum (don't remember exactly), the tires for the 3/4 & 1-ton pickups inflate to 80 psi maximum. I installed the higher pressure "Michelin LTX M/S 2, ALL SEASON, LT265/70R17 LRE ORWL, MSPN 97723" tires and could not believe the difference in towing. I believe that these tires may have made the difference in rolling or not rolling my previous 27' Airstream.

Everybody you ask gives you different recommendations on inflation pressures. I use the truck only when towing, so I settled in on 70 psi in the front, 75 psi in the rear, and 40 psi in the spare (obviously I didn't replace the spare).

I would still recommend a 3/4 ton truck if you go to the 27' (28') route, but if you are going to pull it with a 1/2 ton I definitely recommend you switch to higher pressure tires. They are costly (I think I paid about $1,300 for four tires), but they make a tremendous difference in towing safety.

Genes point is correct. The half ton will operate better with closer tire pressure to spec. Weigh the truck at all corners with trailer hitched and WD applied, same load as if on a long trip.

Weigh it solo, with driver and usual gear aboard when not towing. Full fuel in both cases. All four wheel positions.

Then ask for pro advice on pressure.


The front axle tire pressure should probably be the same towing or empty if WD is adjusted correctly. It is the rear axle weights that will differ.

Pressure that is too high is bad for braking and maneuvering. Understeer is induced sooner. Adding plus five psi to Steer axle while towing is probably okay.

Don't rely on transitory response feeling when towing. Turn in will be slow as it has to account for the trailer axles to begin their turn as well. It is easy to overload the rear axle tires at this point. The truck, the trailer and the WD spring bridge must work together.
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