Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-06-2012, 08:01 PM   #29
Rivet Master
 
switz's Avatar

 
2014 31' Classic
2015 23' International
2013 25' FB International
Apache Junction , Arizona
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 4,799
Images: 8
I tow a 2013 25FB International with a GVW of 7,300 pounds with a 2007 Mercedes ML 320 CDI diesel using a Hensley hitch. There are some folks towing 30' Airstreams with the same vehicle even through the mountains out West.

I would suggest, before buying a bigger vehicle, checking the TV tires and bringing up the pressures to stiffen the sidewalls (perhaps to the maximum value on the sidewall of the tire) when towing. That may solve the squirms. Try that and see if it helps the issue.

I would then consider the Hensley or PP hitch. There are used models of the Hensley from the factory and PP probably has them for their hitch as well. If these do not solve the issue for you, then by all means knock your self out getting a bigger vehicle.

I always trouble shoot from the least expensive alternative upwards to where the real money is at stake. Also, do the test run without the family in the car so there are no other distractions while running your tests.
__________________

__________________
switz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 08:10 PM   #30
Rivet Master
 
Condoluminum's Avatar
 
1988 25' Excella
Sunnyvale , California
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,858
Images: 13
Send a message via AIM to Condoluminum
ANother vote for making sure tire pressures and hitch anti-sway are OK.. We tow a 25' Excella with identical GVWR, though usually with holding tanks empty and fresh water half full. CAT Scale says trailer in that configuration is closer to 6,500 #

We now have 5.4L V8 in Ford Excursion, but previously had mid-90's Suburban 1500.. In both cases, when tow vehicle tires inflated to ~ 55 pounds, trailer would wiggle in the wind and when trucks passed. Inflating tires to 75 pounds cold (including fronts...) solved problem, along with sway bar (friction type..) to go with hitch.. If tires in Tahoe are under 70 psi, it is going to wobble at freeway speeds when towing, especially if hitch isn't helping..

All that notwithstanding, the new Suburban 2500's are sure nice....
__________________

__________________
Condoluminum

In Theory, there's no difference between Theory and Practice, but in Practice, there is usually a difference...
Condoluminum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 08:14 PM   #31
Rivet Master
 
dznf0g's Avatar

 
2007 30' Classic
Oswego , Illinois
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 9,408
Images: 5
re. the tires. Your Tahoe probably came with regular P metric tires. The previous post recommending P metrics with an XL designation is correct, IMO. That will give you some extra capacity and arguably, a better handling trailer lashup.
__________________
-Rich-

"If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy." - Red Green
dznf0g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 08:18 PM   #32
Rivet Master
 
SteveH's Avatar
 
2005 39' Land Yacht 390 XL 396
Common Sense , Texas
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 5,311
More about the tires....increase the pressure in the rear tires only. If you increase the pressure in your front tires, it will make the steering seem faster and can actually contribute to the sway. The rear axle is the one carrying the extra load and the end of the tow vehicle the trailer is trying to "steer".
__________________
Regards,
Steve
SteveH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 08:26 PM   #33
4 Rivet Member
 
SSquared's Avatar
 
2013 25' FB Flying Cloud
Longmont , Colorado
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 497
Search for Moosetags posts

Hello,

I'm still in the "still looking" category, but leaning toward a 25' AS with a Tahoe/Yukon tow vehicle, so I'll be following this thread with interest.

One of the frequent posters here is "moosetags". As I recall their posts, they started towing their 25' AS with a Tahoe, and upgraded to a 3/4 ton Suburban. One of their threads is http://www.airforums.com/forums/f463...hoe-63081.html

They said
As to your Tahoe question, we have towed our 2005 25FB (7400#) with our 2004 Chevrolet Tahoe (5.3/3.73), and found it just OK. We use a Hensley Arrow hitch system, and did not experience any sway or instability problems. The downside to the Tahoe was its lack of guts. During the same period, we also towed the Airstream with our 2005 Suburban 2500 (6.0/3.73). The Tahoe was weak in the power department. The Tahoe was a doable tow vehicle, but we do so much traveling (50,000 miles in three years) that we want more than the Tahoe could provide.

Good Luck and have fun with that Airstream!
__________________
SSquared is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 08:54 PM   #34
2 Rivet Member
 
Katy , Texas
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 28
I just looked at our Michelin LTX M/S tires. I'm having a hard time figuring out the load rating, but I kinda doubt they are D or E-rated. They say you can inflate up to 44psi. Also, I found them on Sam's Club's website and it says "max load: 2305@44psi."
__________________
zeppelin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 09:25 PM   #35
Rivet Master
 
1988 32' Excella
Robbinsville , New Jersey
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1,010
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeppelin View Post
We checked all eight tires (four on TT and four on TV) before our trip. They were perfect. I don't know if I have the E-rated ones, though. I'll look when I get home.
Please define perfect.

Does that mean 32psi like the door says?
__________________
Wazbro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 09:34 PM   #36
2 Rivet Member
 
Katy , Texas
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wazbro View Post
Please define perfect.

Does that mean 32psi like the door says?
Good point....
__________________
zeppelin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 09:47 PM   #37
Rivet Master
 
SteveH's Avatar
 
2005 39' Land Yacht 390 XL 396
Common Sense , Texas
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 5,311
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeppelin View Post
I just looked at our Michelin LTX M/S tires. I'm having a hard time figuring out the load rating, but I kinda doubt they are D or E-rated. They say you can inflate up to 44psi. Also, I found them on Sam's Club's website and it says "max load: 2305@44psi."
Then you need to run 44 pounds pressure, COLD, in the rear tires when towing. Leave the front at what the door says.
__________________
Regards,
Steve
SteveH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 10:55 PM   #38
4 Rivet Member
 
OilnH2o's Avatar
 
1976 27' Overlander
Missoula , Montana
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 374
You've got so much info here, your head must be swimming! But, a lot of this ground has been plowed before and the search feature here will give you tons of information. The difference between what you have and the 2500 can change with rear differentials, tire pressures, weight distribution to front and rear axles of the TV, and then comparing 4 speed and 6 speeds - plus tow packages, and... and.... And, THEN you've opened the "load range-Michelin tires" Pandora's box! (The next layer of that is 15" or 16" wheels!) ALL of these topics have many threads on the forum!

I've learned a lot from the wonderful experts on this forum, and the biggest thing I've learned since we bought our Airstream is that, at the beginning -- I didn't know what I "didn't know!"

I will add only this, to what many have already said -- it seems like your hitch/hitch set-up is a key component to all the issues that you've mentioned thus far. If your hitch set-up is the culprit, you can set it up the same way on a new 2500 and head down the road up-and-down the Texas hill country and have enough "guts" and still end up feeling sway with the semis passing you on the interstate or coming at you on a two-lane. The set-up is for each different TV and there is a lot to it. You might try to get it "right" for your Tahoe, then go shopping for that perfect TV - but you'd still have to set it up all over again for the new rig.

Good luck!
__________________
OilnH2o is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 06:49 AM   #39
2 Rivet Member
 
Katy , Texas
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 28
Ok. I'm onboard with buying a better hitch and properly rated tires. I still feel like I'm not totally clear on all the issues surrounding tongue weight and balancing your load, but possibly I can address those once I have a better setup.

I lean towards not messing too much with my current hitch, because frankly, I don't enjoy the noise created by the friction it uses to work.
__________________
zeppelin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 07:15 AM   #40
Rivet Master
 
dznf0g's Avatar

 
2007 30' Classic
Oswego , Illinois
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 9,408
Images: 5
A minimum of 10% of the total trailer weight should be represented in tongue weight......12 - 15% is better. I like 12%.

Use the search function (the google one) in the blue bar above, and search on "scales", "weighing your trailer", weight distribution, etc. There is a wealth of info already here on the forum.
__________________
-Rich-

"If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy." - Red Green
dznf0g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 08:16 AM   #41
Rivet Master
 
switz's Avatar

 
2014 31' Classic
2015 23' International
2013 25' FB International
Apache Junction , Arizona
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 4,799
Images: 8
All four TV tires need to be at the same pressure with an load equalizer hitch. Set up properly, in theory the hitch distributes the tongue weight equally (1/3 to each) to the three axle sets: trailer axle(s), rear TV axle and front TV axle.

So in my case, the tongue weight is 1,150 pounds. In theory, I am transferring 375 pounds to the TV front axle and 350 pounds to the TV rear axle. Thus the need to know the axle ratings of the TV from the door plate and after a trip across the scales (with the driver in the car and a full gas tank), you will know how much spare capacity exists without the trailer attached on each of the axles. Now take the trailer across the scales at it's usual weight and see if there is indeed a transfer of the tongue weight to the TV. Any unused weight in the TV numbers then has to be allocated to passengers and their "stuff" in the TV. Now go fully loaded with passengers, "stuff", and loaded trailer to ensure the GVW of both the trailer and TV are not exceeded.

In a perfect world, after the hitch is setup properly, the trailer should be level or avery slightly nose down (less than 0.5") so the TV and TT do not appear as a "V" when looked at from the side. The TV should also be level so the headlights are on the road and not the tree tops.

I suggest contacting Andy Thompson at CanAM in Canada. He has set up hundreds of smaller vehicles to tow even the largest Airstreams. He is located in London Ontario Canada (eastern time) and the phone number is (519) 652-3284.
__________________
switz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 08:24 AM   #42
Rivet Master
 
dznf0g's Avatar

 
2007 30' Classic
Oswego , Illinois
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 9,408
Images: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by switz View Post
All four TV tires need to be at the same pressure with an load equalizer hitch. Set up properly, in theory the hitch distributes the tongue weight equally (1/3 to each) to the three axle sets: trailer axle(s), rear TV axle and front TV axle.

So in my case, the tongue weight is 1,150 pounds. In theory, I am transferring 375 pounds to the TV front axle and 350 pounds to the TV rear axle. Thus the need to know the axle ratings of the TV from the door plate and after a trip across the scales (with the driver in the car and a full gas tank), you will know how much spare capacity exists without the trailer attached on each of the axles. Now take the trailer across the scales at it's usual weight and see if there is indeed a transfer of the tongue weight to the TV. Any unused weight in the TV numbers then has to be allocated to passengers and their "stuff" in the TV. Now go fully loaded with passengers, "stuff", and loaded trailer to ensure the GVW of both the trailer and TV are not exceeded.

In a perfect world, after the hitch is setup properly, the trailer should be level or avery slightly nose down (less than 0.5") so the TV and TT do not appear as a "V" when looked at from the side. The TV should also be level so the headlights are on the road and not the tree tops.

I suggest contacting Andy Thompson at CanAM in Canada. He has set up hundreds of smaller vehicles to tow even the largest Airstreams. He is located in London Ontario Canada (eastern time) and the phone number is (519) 652-3284.

Not necessarily, IMO. Depends on the vehicle and what the vehicle mfr recommends on the door jamb. I agree with you if the door jamb recommends all four the same. Then you make adjustments in increments at the same pressure all the way around.

Many vehicles are not the same, particularly 3/4 and 1 ton trucks. Those should be raised IN PROPORTION to the original door jamb recommendation.
__________________

__________________
-Rich-

"If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy." - Red Green
dznf0g is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.