Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-17-2016, 02:07 PM   #15
3 Rivet Member
 
1998 34' Limited
Buford , Georgia
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 111
"Excess towing capacity" is an oxymoron in my oversimplified, more power world. However in my humble opinion, you will be just fine in any foreseeable situation with the Tundra's capabilities. Be especially careful about overloading the truck bed or the trailer and pay special attention to smart loading in the trailer. (not too much in the back or the front.)

Your truck will make you proud, but don't think you have failed if someone pulling a larger rig passes you going up the grades. Let them go. They are paying dearly for the privilege. As previously stated, preparing for the downhill braking is a bigger issue than getting to the top. Assuming that your truck would not have built in engine braking, you can do it quite well as previously described by using your gear selector before starting down the grade. Don't wait until she's gotten up to 50 mph on a big downhill to do the shifting. It won't work. It's better to shift at the top of the grade to a lower gear than seems necessary or reasonable. Get a feel for what that will do and you can always up-shift as appropriate. If your truck has tow/haul setting, then I might modify my suggestion some, but probably not. I would say the first time, you be in charge and let the truck show you what it can do. I'm betting you'll be fine. Tundra is a great truck.
__________________

__________________
fwjumper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 02:08 PM   #16
PSU1981
 
2015 27' Flying Cloud
Spring , Texas
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 107
Dumb question - how exactly should I use the engine/transmission to go up & down steep grades? I know I have a 1st & 2nd gear beside just D - which one do I use & when?
__________________

__________________
PSU1981 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 06:19 PM   #17
3 Rivet Member
 
2017 19' Flying Cloud
Madison , Wisconsin
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 125
Send a message via AIM to jtwind Send a message via MSN to jtwind Send a message via Yahoo to jtwind
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingeezer View Post
I don't know that there is any magic number but I recall years ago a rule of thumb that used to be quoted is that you should be towing at around 75% of your TV's rated capacity.

I doubt that is based on anything particular formula, but I have used it as a yardstick because it seems to me to be logical that for longevity and reliability of the tow vehicle it makes sense not to be pushing what the manufacturer claims to be the limit all the time. Things should be less stressed and last longer the less they are taxed.

So that is what I try to do, and it seems that is about where you are at also with your present rig.

Not sure how meaningful the 75% really is though as I read of many folk who tow at way over their vehicle's rated capacity and appear very happy with the results, reporting no problems at all, either in power, braking, handling, or in vehicle reliability problems - other than maybe going more slowly up hills!

Not for me though - I guess you pay your money and take your choice, I still like the 75% factor!

Brian.
This is what I've learned, followed and think it's smart. There are folks that look at towing capacity and payload as simply marketing and purchasing hype. I think that's a bit dangerous and believe having a margin of safety is just smart and frankly considerate others on the highway if you have an incident that pushes the limits of your vehicle!
__________________
jtwind is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 06:59 PM   #18
4 Rivet Member
 
2015 30' International
FREDERICK , Maryland
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 250
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSU1981 View Post
We have a 2015 27FB FC that I pull with a 2015 Tundra with 10,000 lbs towing capacity. The cloud has a UBW - dry weight around 5800 lbs - With Max gross weight of 7600 lbs. Anyways how much excess towing capacity should I have to say pull thru the Rockies? Be able to tow anywhere in the U.S. ?

Thanks,

Glenn
I towed my 2015 30' International Serenity with my 2014 Tundra from MD to NV and back last year just fine. Leaving in a few weeks for another month long trip to CO, NM and AZ with the same rig. Like others have said, you won't be the first one to the top of those long high passes, but you will make it just fine. Just remember to gear down going down the other side and always stay in the far right lane. Take it easy and you will be fine.
__________________
Doc Foster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 07:14 PM   #19
2 Rivet Member
 
1976 Argosy 20
1975 20' Argosy 20
LA , California
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 36
Hi,

I also have a Tundra (2007) and have done my fair share of towing. I found a weight distributing hitch and E load rated tires on the truck changed towing from ok to no problem.

Ray
__________________
heyraylata is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 07:48 PM   #20
Rivet Master
 
Wingeezer's Avatar
 
2005 30' Classic
Burlington , Ontario
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,708
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtwind View Post
This is what I've learned, followed and think it's smart. There are folks that look at towing capacity and payload as simply marketing and purchasing hype. I think that's a bit dangerous and believe having a margin of safety is just smart and frankly considerate others on the highway if you have an incident that pushes the limits of your vehicle!

Glad to hear I have some company!

I am a retired Professional Mech. Eng. and so one may suggest that I should be able to figure things out myself and make my own intelligent decision.

Could be, but as an engineer, I certainly don't profess expertise in all fields ... if any!

And so in this area where I had little experience , I opted to go with recommendations of the TV manufacturer and in fact, I prefer to err on the side of towing at less than rated capacity, suspecting from my own business experience that the marketing department may have won out over the engineering department in establishing advertised tow ratings!

Also - being somewhat of a worry wart, I like to operate well within manufacturer's limits from the standpoint of any accident in which I may become involved, whether deemed to be my fault or not.

Some have said this is not an issue when it comes to towing.

Could well be so, I just don't know, but I can tell you that I'd rather not find out from personal experience! I'd rather have things in my favour!

Something I believed and have since confirmed by experience is that for the last three tow vehicles I have owned, each one has progressively had a longer wheelbase, and each has provided a more stable towing platform and a far more relaxing towing experience.

At the same time however, I did also move to a Hensley hitch, (Propride would have been the same I expect) because I bought into the concept.

So I'm not entirely sure what has given the greatest improvement, the Hensley, the longer wheelbase, or perhaps the combination thereof!

All I can say is that at this point, the trailer sure tows like a dream! I could not ask for more.

I won't pretend there has not been a downside - I will be the first to admit that our truck isn't the easiest to park at the mall - and it is our daily driver.

I just park further away from the mall doors at an "end spot." Heck, I need the exercise anyway! Also for this reason I think, after eight years use, our truck has still to suffer its first door ding!

As well, the truck wasn't cheap - but it's only money and you only get one kick at the cat! Time to spoil myself! Being a low mileage diesel, I'm hoping it will hold its value fairly well.

I do find the truck also very handy for many other chores - and also to help neighbours as needed, which I am very happy to do.

Guess I'll only (reluctantly) trade the truck if we downsize to an Airstream "Nest." or get out of RV'ing altogether!

All indications are though that "SWMBO" will never go for a smaller AS, so it would likely have to be the latter!

Brian
__________________
Brian & Connie Mitchell

2005 Classic 30'
Hensley Arrow / Centramatics
2008 GMC Sierra SLT 2500HD,4x4,Crew Cab, Diesel, Leer cap.
Wingeezer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 07:51 PM   #21
Airstreamer In Training
 
FCStreamer's Avatar
 
2014 30' Flying Cloud
Tampa , Florida
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 1,262
Blog Entries: 1
I think the payload and towing limits have been limited enough by the lawyers. If my truck says it can haul 8000 lbs, then I am going to haul up to 8000 lbs. Not 8001, but yes to 8000. And if my payload is 1600, then I am going to load 1600. I think that if they posted those numbers, it was for a REASON. I will stick to those numbers rather than trying to impose some self-defined limitation.
__________________
2014 Airstream Flying Cloud 30 Recliner - WBCCI #4850 - AIR #110821
2013 Cadillac Escalade Tow Vehicle, Equal-i-zer Hitch
Visit Our Flying Cloud blog for my latest adventure!
FCStreamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 09:48 PM   #22
Rivet Master
 
A W Warn's Avatar
 
2000 25' Safari
1999 34' Excella
Davidson County, NC , Highlands County, FL
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,568
Quote:
Originally Posted by PSU1981 View Post
We have a 2015 27FB FC that I pull with a 2015 Tundra with 10,000 lbs towing capacity. The cloud has a UBW - dry weight around 5800 lbs - With Max gross weight of 7600 lbs. Anyways how much excess towing capacity should I have to say pull thru the Rockies? Be able to tow anywhere in the U.S. ?

Thanks,

Glenn
My opinion is that your truck is adequate.

However;

You also need to consider the Gross Combined Weight Rating of your tow vehicle, when calculating whether or not your vehicle combination is within specs.

At some point, as trailer weight increases, payload in the tow vehicle has to be decreased. At maximum trailer weight, calculations using the tow vehicle manufacturer's specs will show that payload will be limited to the weight of a driver.

At some point, as you carry additional payload in the tow vehicle, the actual towing capacity is decreased below maximum capacity.

My suggestion: Weigh the vehicles! Then, DO THE CALCULATIONS!
It's the only way to know for sure if your loaded vehicles are within specs.
__________________
A W Warn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 10:47 PM   #23
Rivet Master
 
dkottum's Avatar
 
2012 25' Flying Cloud
Battle Lake , Minnesota
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 7,716
My problem with ratings is they give no consideration for differences in trailer design, aerodynamics, center of gravity and type of suspension. Or how it's loaded, correct weight and balance. This makes a difference.

They make no consideration for a weight distribution and/or sway control/sway elimination hitch, and the quality of setup. This makes a difference.

There are differences in the design of possible tow vehicles that give those more closely matched to the trailer being towed, advantages over tow vehicles that greatly exceed the needs of the trailer being towed. Too much excess capacity may lead to a truck that is more prone to handling issues in emergency maneuvers, and more likely to be unstable when it happens. As I understand it.

For these reasons we have no reservations about choosing our tow vehicle that is closely matched to our particular Airstream, extended travel destinations, and load requirements. Fifty years of travel defines our requirements. We have the easiest towing, most stable travel trailer hitched properly by a rock solid w.d. hitch.

We have plenty of excess quality in our towing combination if not excess ratings, it is intentional and we believe a high quality, very safe truck, hitch and trailer in all travel conditions.

The truck's fuel economy, drivability and very comfortable ride are also considerations and a bonus.
__________________
Doug and Cheryl
2012 FC RB, Michelin 16, ProPride 1400
2016 Ram 1500 Laramie Crew Cab 4X4 Ecodiesel 3.92 axles

The Truth is More Important Than the Facts
dkottum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2016, 11:21 PM   #24
"Space A" S/O Registry 11
 
2006 34' Classic S/O
Fort Worth , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 550
Just a word of caution. When you add up your weights be sure an use actual scale weights. The tendency is to under estimate real axle weight. And, manufactures do not allow for all the add ons theirs or yours. It would be a shame to by a new rig and find out you are overloaded standing still. Then try going to the mountains with a non-aspirated gas engine that looses approximately 2% torque for every 1,000 feet of altitude. Pretty soon 45MPH over passes sounds good. You can't beat torque for pulling. That is why diesels are so popular in the RV business. Long ago the Suburban with a gas 454 cid was the best. I could make 25 mph over Raton pass on I-25. Now, with a big diesel, bigger trailer, I can drive the speed limit up hill and the grade brake keeps the speed at the limit going down hill. We have come a long way in RVing.
guskmg
__________________
guskmg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2016, 08:40 AM   #25
Rivet Master
 
dkottum's Avatar
 
2012 25' Flying Cloud
Battle Lake , Minnesota
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 7,716
Yes, axle weight capacity plays second fiddle in most discussions about payload capacity. Doing the simple math, hitch weight plus truck load, and calling it good ignores the possibility of overloading of an axle, and ignores the function of the weight distribution hitch.

After setting up a towing combo, it's a good idea to weigh it at a truck scale. At least the first time. Our Ram 1500 has 3900 lb axles carrying near identical weights on each, it would be very easy to overload the rear axle and leave the front axle too light for good control. Loaded to GVWR we still have 850 lbs total axle capacity remaining, and plenty of tire capacity determined by tire pressure.

Modern gas engine/transmssions are quite capable and efficient compared to earlier engine/transmissions. We have towed our present Airstream over Raton pass both directions with a 4.7 Tundra and 5.7 Ram 1500 without problems. The 5.7 has excess capacity.
__________________
Doug and Cheryl
2012 FC RB, Michelin 16, ProPride 1400
2016 Ram 1500 Laramie Crew Cab 4X4 Ecodiesel 3.92 axles

The Truth is More Important Than the Facts
dkottum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2016, 08:50 AM   #26
Airstreamer In Training
 
FCStreamer's Avatar
 
2014 30' Flying Cloud
Tampa , Florida
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 1,262
Blog Entries: 1
I don't understand the distinction. Doesn't the payload number take into account the rear axel weight capacity?

I mean, my truck is not going to tell me it can have a 2000 lb payload if the axel can't handle it?
__________________
2014 Airstream Flying Cloud 30 Recliner - WBCCI #4850 - AIR #110821
2013 Cadillac Escalade Tow Vehicle, Equal-i-zer Hitch
Visit Our Flying Cloud blog for my latest adventure!
FCStreamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2016, 09:10 AM   #27
Rivet Master
 
dkottum's Avatar
 
2012 25' Flying Cloud
Battle Lake , Minnesota
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 7,716
Yes and no, you can load the truck to GVWR (actual truck weight plus load) and still be over an axle rating with a heavy trailer hitch weight. That one of the reasons weight distribution and scale weights matter.

For example our GVRW is 6950 lbs, our axle ratings (3900 plus 3900) total 7800 lbs. Hitching the trailer and truck bed load and us does not exceed GVWR, but without weight distribution applied it may overload the rear axle, the front axle load will be reduced.
__________________
Doug and Cheryl
2012 FC RB, Michelin 16, ProPride 1400
2016 Ram 1500 Laramie Crew Cab 4X4 Ecodiesel 3.92 axles

The Truth is More Important Than the Facts
dkottum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-18-2016, 09:14 AM   #28
Airstreamer In Training
 
FCStreamer's Avatar
 
2014 30' Flying Cloud
Tampa , Florida
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 1,262
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkottum View Post
Yes and no, you can load the truck to GVWR (actual truck weight plus load) and still be over an axle rating with a heavy trailer hitch weight.
If I did that, I would most likely be over my payload number, wouldn't I?
__________________

__________________
2014 Airstream Flying Cloud 30 Recliner - WBCCI #4850 - AIR #110821
2013 Cadillac Escalade Tow Vehicle, Equal-i-zer Hitch
Visit Our Flying Cloud blog for my latest adventure!
FCStreamer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Excess Parrbond on A/S Skin Cousin Eddie Leaks - Weatherstrips, Gaskets, Caulks & Sealants 5 10-03-2012 04:37 PM
Excess parts available Exsys Cabinets, Counter Tops & Furnishings 12 02-18-2012 08:59 PM
How much towing capacity do I need? altamont Tow Vehicles 19 02-25-2007 02:16 PM
Carbon Monoxide: How much is too much? Lotek General Appliance Topics 3 01-08-2005 07:06 AM
How much is to much garry Our Community 13 07-08-2003 04:53 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.