Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-02-2016, 06:16 AM   #127
Rivet Master
 
GettinAway's Avatar
 
2011 23' FB Flying Cloud
Chesterfield , Missouri
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 820
The old Toyota landcruisers has straight sixes in them. We were never able to wear one out. Never even had to put a wrench one one. All had well over 200,000 miles.
One thing about them though, they got terrible gas mileage. My 4.0 jeep engine was the same. Ran great, but poor mileage. Is there something about a straight six that makes it bullet proof, but fuel innefficient? I have no clue.. Sorry, I'm also way off topic. I don't know if I'll ever go to a diesel. Just seems like too expensive to maintain. I like to keep a vehicle for a long time.
Jeff
__________________

__________________
2011 FC 23FB
2012 Toyota Tundra Dbl Cab, 5.7 4x4
GettinAway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2016, 07:22 AM   #128
Rivet Master
 
dznf0g's Avatar

 
2007 30' Classic
Oswego , Illinois
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 9,241
Images: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by GettinAway View Post
The old Toyota landcruisers has straight sixes in them. We were never able to wear one out. Never even had to put a wrench one one. All had well over 200,000 miles.
One thing about them though, they got terrible gas mileage. My 4.0 jeep engine was the same. Ran great, but poor mileage. Is there something about a straight six that makes it bullet proof, but fuel inefficient? I have no clue.. Sorry, I'm also way off topic. I don't know if I'll ever go to a diesel. Just seems like too expensive to maintain. I like to keep a vehicle for a long time.
Jeff
Yes there is...and I am not knocking them at all. I also had an FJ40. That six's design and rights belonged to GM. The old Chevy 235. Toyota purchased the rights and design because the 235 was used very heavily, globally, in everything from tractors to trucks and construction equipment. Smart move on Toyota's part, as many brands of parts bolted up to it and scavenged parts could literally be found in the middle of the desert.

A six cylinder has very long crankshaft, rods and camshaft. As such they have a lot of rotating and reciprocating mass. That spell out a fuel economy penalty. Also they have a very long block and a much greater quench area. (the amount of surface area for heat to escape from the combustion chambers to the cooling system). That spells out much more waste heat escaping to the atmosphere and not used for motion. Another fuel economy penalty.

But the ability of a tall block and long crank throws allows for a longer piston stroke, and thus more torque capability out of an inline engine per cu. in. of displacement.

Now, mind you, those are the mechanicals. Modern electronics and fuel delivery components can "cheat" the physics somewhat, but the physics still applies.
__________________

__________________
-Rich-

"If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy." - Red Green
dznf0g is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2016, 11:10 AM   #129
Vintage Kin
 
slowmover's Avatar
 
Fort Worth , Texas
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 7,325
Images: 1
Ford Powerstroke VS Duramax and Cummings

4.0L in our 2001 2WD XJ Cherokee capable of 20+ mpg at around 65-mph. EFI really made a difference.

The other straight sixes I've had weren't quite thirsty, but never quite economical, either. They were meant to be cast iron reliable. That usually means FE takes a hit as the mechanical fuel delivery was as unsophisticated as possible for a given era.


1990 35' Silver Streak
2004 555 Cummins
__________________
1990 35' Silver Streak Sterling; 9k GVWR.
2004 DODGE Cummins 305/555; 6-manual; 9k GVWR.
Hensley Arrow. 9-cpm solo, 15-cpm towing
Sold: Silver Streak Model 3411
slowmover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2016, 11:19 AM   #130
Rivet Master
 
m.hony's Avatar
 
2013 30' Classic
Greenwood , Mississippi
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 11,690
Quote:
Originally Posted by dznf0g View Post
Yes there is...and I am not knocking them at all. I also had an FJ40. That six's design and rights belonged to GM. The old Chevy 235. Toyota purchased the rights and design because the 235 was used very heavily, globally, in everything from tractors to trucks and construction equipment. Smart move on Toyota's part, as many brands of parts bolted up to it and scavenged parts could literally be found in the middle of the desert.

A six cylinder has very long crankshaft, rods and camshaft. As such they have a lot of rotating and reciprocating mass. That spell out a fuel economy penalty. Also they have a very long block and a much greater quench area. (the amount of surface area for heat to escape from the combustion chambers to the cooling system). That spells out much more waste heat escaping to the atmosphere and not used for motion. Another fuel economy penalty.

But the ability of a tall block and long crank throws allows for a longer piston stroke, and thus more torque capability out of an inline engine per cu. in. of displacement.

Now, mind you, those are the mechanicals. Modern electronics and fuel delivery components can "cheat" the physics somewhat, but the physics still applies.
I've often heard the awesome 5.7 engine in my Tundra was bought from GM- the old 350- not sure how true it is. Worth a Google search I guess.
Apparently it is a myth that GM sold their 5.7L design to Toyota as the 2 engines are completely different.
__________________
2013 Classic 30 Limited
2007 Silver Toyota Tundra Crew Max Limited 5.7 iForce
2006 Vivid Black Harley-Davidson Road King Classic
1999 Black Nissan Pathfinder LE
TAC #MS-10
WBCCI #1811, Region 6, Unit 56
Airforums #70955
m.hony is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-02-2016, 12:54 PM   #131
Rivet Master
 
dznf0g's Avatar

 
2007 30' Classic
Oswego , Illinois
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 9,241
Images: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by m.hony View Post
I've often heard the awesome 5.7 engine in my Tundra was bought from GM- the old 350- not sure how true it is. Worth a Google search I guess.
Apparently it is a myth that GM sold their 5.7L design to Toyota as the 2 engines are completely different.
Myth....!
__________________
-Rich-

"If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy." - Red Green
dznf0g is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2016, 07:39 AM   #133
Rivet Master
 
GettinAway's Avatar
 
2011 23' FB Flying Cloud
Chesterfield , Missouri
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 820
Haha! 2500 HP!
Thanks dvzf0g, for the info on the old Landcruiser in line six. I had always heard it came from a GM design, but was made with tighter tolerances. Not sure about that last part.
We used to pull our huge pop up with a older Landcruiser. Two canoes on the roof of the cruiser, five bikes on the pop up, and grossly overloaded. I'd have a tough time holding 2nd gear going over some of the Colo passes. Just used to torture the engine and transmission. Took it over Imogene pass one day. Went anywhere, but we didn't drive by many gas stations without stopping. Ha
__________________
2011 FC 23FB
2012 Toyota Tundra Dbl Cab, 5.7 4x4
GettinAway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2016, 09:05 AM   #134
Rivet Master
 
dznf0g's Avatar

 
2007 30' Classic
Oswego , Illinois
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 9,241
Images: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by GettinAway View Post
Haha! 2500 HP!
Thanks dvzf0g, for the info on the old Landcruiser in line six. I had always heard it came from a GM design, but was made with tighter tolerances. Not sure about that last part.
We used to pull our huge pop up with a older Landcruiser. Two canoes on the roof of the cruiser, five bikes on the pop up, and grossly overloaded. I'd have a tough time holding 2nd gear going over some of the Colo passes. Just used to torture the engine and transmission. Took it over Imogene pass one day. Went anywhere, but we didn't drive by many gas stations without stopping. Ha
I don't know about the "tighter tolerances" part. The 237 (Toy had a slightly different head design which gained 2 Cubes over the out of production Chev 235) rattled like an old sewing machine....but was absolutely bullet proof, as was the 235.

I do know that Toyota's castings had a higher nickel content than the 235, and arguably had more resistance to wear in the cylinders than the 235. Valves and valve seats were a common issue with the LC though. Fortunately, I was then in my "advanced engines" class at the time and had full access to the university shop and machine shop. That was at about 70K. Normal for that generation of LC.
__________________
-Rich-

"If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy." - Red Green
dznf0g is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2016, 06:29 PM   #135
2 Rivet Member
 
abone's Avatar
 
2017 27' International
Richmond , British Columbia
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 60
My brother and I each had twin '74 FJ40's, same colour, identical trucks when we were in our early 20's. Man we had fun with those trucks, they were beasts.
We both had to do the valves at around 40,000 miles, rust issues and poor fuel economy. Wish we still had them, they are collectors trucks now.
__________________
2017 27FB Intl Sig
2017 F350 Super Duty
abone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-03-2016, 09:18 PM   #136
Rivet Master
 
dznf0g's Avatar

 
2007 30' Classic
Oswego , Illinois
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 9,241
Images: 5
Yup, mine was a 73. Pulled a lot of big blocks out of the mud holes with that "little engine that could" Rust was horrible. By 60k, there were holes in the rear 1/4 's. Let in a lot of exhaust fumes.
__________________
-Rich-

"If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy." - Red Green
dznf0g is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2016, 05:41 AM   #137
New Member
 
edmonton , Alberta
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by m.hony View Post
Lackluster payload, economy, power, towing capacity and high price-
The Titan has never been a game changer or even in the game- not even a player.
Extremely disappointing news about the new cummins in the titan. The Gas version of the HD titan actually out performs the diesel in almost every category with only about a 10% loss in fuel economy. That isn't all that bad as diesel seems to average a high cost over the last 10 years. I do know that the gm's have always been consistently the best in one performance category for over a decade and that is in going downhill. They have engine braking down to an art.
If you look at the cost factors of purchasing and owning a diesel truck it really doesn't make sense, so why do people buy them to pull around a realtively light airstream. It's about percieved performance, comfort and of course image. If you look at a corvette as a car, it gets poor mileage, it can get hung up pretty easy because it's low to the ground, it's noisy, has really crappy storage and if the one leaf spring breaks in the rear suspension your toast. Funny they still sell lots of them.
I would definitely buy a 3/4 ton diesel if I had the money, they are much quieter underload, are heavier so less of the tail wagging the dog, easier downhill in the braking dept. and are mighter in the numbers racket.
__________________
lostcomma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-04-2016, 06:21 AM   #138
Rivet Master
 
crispyboy's Avatar
 
1994 30' Excella
alexandria , Kentucky
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 1,650
Images: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by lostcomma View Post
If you look at the cost factors of purchasing and owning a diesel truck it really doesn't make sense, so why do people buy them to pull around a relatively light airstream. It's about percieved performance, comfort and of course image.
As to your last sentence: NO, YES and NO.

I bought my particular truck because it was engineered to do the job for which it is being used - mainly towing and hauling duties plus long trips. It is comfortable enough that I would much rather drive it than a car.
There is no perceived performance about it. Braking - while a diesel 3/4 ton has the same brakes as a gas 3/4 ton the diesel will control the load with the use of the exhaust brake and much less use of the service brakes. Acceleration for merging into traffic and maintaining on hills - diesel torque makes the drive easier and safer - I can merge in heavy traffic, keep up with traffic without being a hinderance or pass a slow truck on an incline.
A gas truck will pull any Airstream trailer made just fine but the diesel truck will out perform in every category as the load gets bigger. Less than 27' AS go gas 1/2 ton - larger than 27' go diesel if you can swing it.
__________________
Steve, Christy, Anna and Scout (Border Collie deceased 11-30-2016)
1994 Classic 30'11" Excella - rear twin
2009 Dodge 2500, 6 Speed Auto, CTD, Quad Cab, Short Bed
Hensley with adjustable stinger
WBCCI # 3072
crispyboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-07-2016, 06:55 AM   #139
2 Rivet Member
 
2016 27' Flying Cloud
Quebec , Quebec
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 63
Images: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by lostcomma View Post
Extremely disappointing news about the new cummins in the titan. The Gas version of the HD titan actually out performs the diesel in almost every category with only about a 10% loss in fuel economy. That isn't all that bad as diesel seems to average a high cost over the last 10 years. I do know that the gm's have always been consistently the best in one performance category for over a decade and that is in going downhill. They have engine braking down to an art.
If you look at the cost factors of purchasing and owning a diesel truck it really doesn't make sense, so why do people buy them to pull around a realtively light airstream. It's about percieved performance, comfort and of course image. If you look at a corvette as a car, it gets poor mileage, it can get hung up pretty easy because it's low to the ground, it's noisy, has really crappy storage and if the one leaf spring breaks in the rear suspension your toast. Funny they still sell lots of them.
I would definitely buy a 3/4 ton diesel if I had the money, they are much quieter underload, are heavier so less of the tail wagging the dog, easier downhill in the braking dept. and are mighter in the numbers racket.
You are absolutely right a diesel is more expensive to drive and buy than a gas engine if you do less than 25000 miles a year. If you can afford a Diesel go for it. If you do more than 25000 miles think about it. If you do more than 30000 miles a year, go for it.
__________________
Toutsi 1957 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2016, 04:14 PM   #140
Rivet Master
 
pappy19's Avatar
 
2002 30' Classic S/O
Garden Valley , Idaho
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,404
All those miles you listed, especially saying that 30,000 miles a year warrants buying a diesel, is silly. Today's gas engines can go 200,000 with no problem with decent maintenance. In actuality diesel engines start having their own problems after their 100,000 mile warranty runs out. Many things start to go bad that are very expensive on a diesel. Gas engines don't have much to go bad other than spark plugs or a water pump. Again, you don't need a diesel to haul your Airstream, you just want one.
__________________

__________________
2008 F-250 4X4 Lariat V-10
2002 Airstream Classic 30' w/SO #2074
2007 Kubota 900 RTV
1996 Ford Bronco
2007 Lincoln LT
pappy19 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Duramax or Cummings Diesel? RivaHaven Towing, Tow Vehicles & Hitches 130 11-28-2015 06:24 AM
Ford 6.0 Powerstroke engine problems & fixes page.crow Tow Vehicles 15 10-29-2013 08:01 AM
Ford 6.7L Powerstroke nilesrob General Repair Forum 29 10-05-2013 02:28 PM
Anybody pull with stock Ford 7.3L Powerstroke diesel? JBCrete2 Tow Vehicles 15 08-07-2007 11:29 PM
'94-34' Cummings powered MH Tarheel General Motorhome Topics 1 06-10-2004 06:26 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:39 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.