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Old 01-21-2011, 08:36 AM   #71
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The 2011 Duramax powered GM pickups DO have an exhaust brake (via the turbo), which coupled with the Allison, gives truly amazing downhill (mountain) speed control. There are several after market programmers that can add this feature to older Duramax powered pickups.
I'm (as usual) a bit confused!

I thought that an exhaust brake was actually some sort of gate valve in the exhaust that was closed as needed to impede flow of exhaust gasses, and that a "Jake" (Jacobs) brake was something different again that messed with the engine valve timing to provide engine braking.

Am I wrong in this? Are you saying that the equivalent of the 2011 GMC exhaust brake can be had on my 2008 by some sort of aftermarket chip and that no additional hardware is involved?

I suppose I probably should mess with things like that anyway even if possible as I have a 6 year extended warranty and would't want to jeopardize it.

Thanks ........ Brian.
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Old 01-21-2011, 08:54 AM   #72
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I don't know really anything about the 2011 model and how that EB works, but I know that aftermarket ones are available for at least my model year of truck, probably many others too. Banks Power | 01-04 Chevy/GMC - 6.6L Duramax LB7>>Banks Brake®
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Old 01-21-2011, 01:52 PM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingeezer View Post
I'm (as usual) a bit confused!

I thought that an exhaust brake was actually some sort of gate valve in the exhaust that was closed as needed to impede flow of exhaust gasses, and that a "Jake" (Jacobs) brake was something different again that messed with the engine valve timing to provide engine braking.

Am I wrong in this? Are you saying that the equivalent of the 2011 GMC exhaust brake can be had on my 2008 by some sort of aftermarket chip and that no additional hardware is involved?

I suppose I probably should mess with things like that anyway even if possible as I have a 6 year extended warranty and would't want to jeopardize it.

Thanks ........ Brian.
Yes, Jake brakes are internal to the engine. Closes all the valves, I believe (simplistic Explanation I am sure). LD exhaust brakes create backpressure in the exhaust by closing off the exhaust.
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Old 01-21-2011, 02:21 PM   #74
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Per Wikipedia

A compression release engine brake, frequently called a Jake brake or Jacobs brake, is an engine braking mechanism installed on some diesel engines. When activated, it opens exhaust valves in the cylinders, releasing the compressed air trapped in the cylinders, and slowing the vehicle.
Although Jake brake properly refers to the Jacobs brand of engine brakes, the term has become a genericized trademark and is often used to refer to engine brakes or compression release engine brakes in general, especially on large vehicles or heavy equipment.
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Old 01-21-2011, 03:19 PM   #75
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From what I have read exhaust braking can come 3 different ways.
  1. Jacobs brake - an actual Jacobs brake is used on large semi-tractor's.(designed into the engine).
  2. In-line exhaust brake - such as Banks or Jacobs brand and others.
  3. Variable Geometry Turbo - sliding turbo vanes.
I am not familiar with the Duramax but it is possible these newer gm trucks may have a variable geometry turbo which can do the same things as an exhaust brake. The factory Dodge/Cummins uses this setup inconjunction with the automatic transmission. The Dodge dealership service manager told me it is a good idea to use the exhaust brake often so that the vanes don't get full of soot thereby limiting the amount sliding turbo vanes. There is an actual cleaning procedure for this.
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Old 01-21-2011, 09:53 PM   #76
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Engine brakes and exhaust brakes. Pickup trucks are fitted wit the latter.
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Old 01-21-2011, 10:52 PM   #77
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Originally Posted by Wingeezer View Post
I'm (as usual) a bit confused!

I thought that an exhaust brake was actually some sort of gate valve in the exhaust that was closed as needed to impede flow of exhaust gasses, and that a "Jake" (Jacobs) brake was something different again that messed with the engine valve timing to provide engine braking.

Am I wrong in this? Are you saying that the equivalent of the 2011 GMC exhaust brake can be had on my 2008 by some sort of aftermarket chip and that no additional hardware is involved?

I suppose I probably should mess with things like that anyway even if possible as I have a 6 year extended warranty and would't want to jeopardize it.

Thanks ........ Brian.

Check out Dieselplace.com. Some programmers have figured this out for the
LBZ and LMM Diesels. Yes, using them could jeopardize your warranty.
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Old 01-22-2011, 01:27 AM   #78
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Old 01-22-2011, 07:59 PM   #79
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IIRC, I think it is the Magnuson (sp?( Act protects your right to add aftermarket goodies without affecting your warranty.

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Old 01-22-2011, 08:13 PM   #80
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Actually the Magnusson Moss Warranty Act says you don't have to use OEM parts to repair your vehicle in order to maintain your overall warranty. Adding "goodies" is not part of that law. If a modification (goodie???) causes a failure of a warrantable part, the mfr is not obligated to cover that particular repair. Or, if a non- OEM repair part causes failure of another component, the mfr. is not obligated to repair.
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Old 01-23-2011, 08:27 PM   #81
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GM has a good multipoint inspection sheet you can download and print copies of here.
http://www.goodwrench.com/_res/pdf/M...ectionForm.pdf
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Old 02-02-2011, 07:53 PM   #82
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Mileage range ... 26 gallons

Ok .... Slightly different topic related to the Chevy Duramax.

One of the few complaints I have about this truck is the small fuel tank. I wish it were around 35 or 40 gallons. I understand there are after market tanks that you can buy and replace the OEM tank, but it looks like they sell for $1000+. What is wrong with just getting two or three 5 gallon fuel cans? I know you would have to stop and get out of the truck to fill up, but that inconvenience is a whole lot cheaper than the cost of a new tank.

If you are going to carry fuel in the back of your pickup, what do you need to be careful about?

Interested in your comments.
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Old 02-02-2011, 08:23 PM   #83
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We went on a long trip last summer (almost 15K miles) which included Alaska, and that's exactly what we did...we took two 5 gallon cans of Diesel fuel with us. We had to use it once also, when the station I was counting on was out of Diesel.

I agree, the fuel tank should be bigger.
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Old 02-02-2011, 08:32 PM   #84
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Ok .... Slightly different topic related to the Chevy Duramax.

One of the few complaints I have about this truck is the small fuel tank. I wish it were around 35 or 40 gallons. I understand there are after market tanks that you can buy and replace the OEM tank, but it looks like they sell for $1000+. What is wrong with just getting two or three 5 gallon fuel cans? I know you would have to stop and get out of the truck to fill up, but that inconvenience is a whole lot cheaper than the cost of a new tank.

If you are going to carry fuel in the back of your pickup, what do you need to be careful about?

Interested in your comments.
The new model has a larger tank standard...34 gals? Not sure...

Lots of Folks do add the after market tank..but I agree...I can do a lot of other fun stuff with $1k.

I have carried a 6 gal diesel jug when going to some remote locations. At 15 mpg towing, this will get us a good 75 miles...
We have never needed it though...
Deezul has a higher flash point than gas, so it is not particularly dangerous to carry...

As far as highway mileage...I usually need some caffeine and/or pee stop after 300 miles or so anyway...this is just about when I want to fill the tank (1/4)...so the small tank has not been much of an issue.

But I agree, given a choice...bigger is better. At least for an OEM tank.

Bill
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