Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-23-2014, 09:44 AM   #15
Rivet Puller
 
SeeMore's Avatar
 
2003 28' Safari S/O
Marietta , Georgia
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 1,232
Images: 3
"If you are looking for a MOSTLY highway miles truck....look for the calculation to be closer to 50 miles per recorded hour."

I have no intent to start an extended off topic dialog over one of many decision factors but dznf0g's insight is mathematically flawed as a decision variable. "Mostly" merely means more than half, not exclusively. To average 50 or better requires driving at high rates of speed over prolonged periods to offset idle time, and start/stop over it's entire life. I doubt you will find any pickup trucks that match the 50 threshold for prior usage, you would be very hard pressed to find one over 40. My current truck has 25,000 miles on it and has been used almost exclusively for Airstream towing (~90%) to 40 states in 2.5 years using interstates at 60-62 mph on day runs of 350-400 miles with infrequent use once unhitched at my destinations. It calculates out to a 33 mph average (odometer/engine hours). I hope that helps.
__________________

__________________
SeeMore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2014, 11:04 AM   #16
Rivet Master
 
dznf0g's Avatar

 
2007 30' Classic
Oswego , Illinois
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 9,403
Images: 5
Nor am I. I only had issue with the use of "Mostly". Your calculations puts you right smack dab in the industry accepted "average" miles per hour of run time. You have to excuse me...I live in the fleet world, where we have wild swings. For example, a truck with a lot of PTO time may show 10 miles per hour of run time, while a delivery truck (like an AS delivery truck) may show upwards of 50. The latter is my definition of "mostly". Symantics, I know....

To the original question, I'd avoid the 10 and look for 33 plus.
__________________

__________________
-Rich-

"If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy." - Red Green
dznf0g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2014, 09:41 AM   #17
Vintage Kin
 
slowmover's Avatar
 
Fort Worth , Texas
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 7,583
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by dznf0g View Post
This is valid, but let me expand. A result of "30" means it has averaged 30 mph...hardly "mostly highway miles" . The figure used for determining a guestamite of idle time is 33 miles per hour of recorded meter time.

If you are looking for a MOSTLY highway miles truck....look for the calculation to be closer to 50 miles per recorded hour.
The engine design life will be predicated at about a 35-mph average. And an average of 27-mph or higher is consistent with fuel efficiency. In other words, the idle time climbs precipitously below this. I'd be happy with anything near or around 30. I'd pass on 22-mph unless total miles was quite low.

When I bought mine the average was 47-mph. Since down to 39-mph, overall. The original owner had a service company . . . and as a truck driver I can about guarantee you that an average this high for a truck used regionally (non-major metro; west Texas) meant that ol' boy only stopped for diesel and cigarettes.

50-mph would be non-metro, all Interstate, speaking practically. It's the number we use for trip planning, point-to-point.

.
__________________
1990 35' Silver Streak Sterling; 9k GVWR.
2004 DODGE Cummins 305/555; 6-manual; 9k GVWR.
Hensley Arrow. 9-cpm solo, 15-cpm towing
Sold: Silver Streak Model 3411
slowmover is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2014, 02:15 PM   #18
Rivet Master
 
dznf0g's Avatar

 
2007 30' Classic
Oswego , Illinois
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 9,403
Images: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowmover View Post
The engine design life will be predicated at about a 35-mph average. And an average of 27-mph or higher is consistent with fuel efficiency. In other words, the idle time climbs precipitously below this. I'd be happy with anything near or around 30. I'd pass on 22-mph unless total miles was quite low.

When I bought mine the average was 47-mph. Since down to 39-mph, overall. The original owner had a service company . . . and as a truck driver I can about guarantee you that an average this high for a truck used regionally (non-major metro; west Texas) meant that ol' boy only stopped for diesel and cigarettes.

50-mph would be non-metro, all Interstate, speaking practically. It's the number we use for trip planning, point-to-point.

.
This is accurate in my experience.
__________________
-Rich-

"If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy." - Red Green
dznf0g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2014, 05:04 PM   #19
3 Rivet Member
 
TankerIP's Avatar
 
2002 22' International
Austin , Texas
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 215
Dodge RAM

I got lucky. Bought the Airstream, only then realized my 6cyl F150 might be too small. So came across the 2001 Dodge 2500 on the side of the road for sale. It had 190,000 miles. Now at 250,000 miles it still goes wherever we want. Never had to do maintenance, except for new AC compressor ($900) and a lift pump ($200)

Always thinking of getting a new one (for reliability concerns) but on the other hand $10,000 for repairs on the current old one might go a lot further than $40,000 on a new one. Always a quandry.
__________________
TankerIP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2014, 06:46 PM   #20
Rivet Master
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 811
I have an old diesel Excursion that I purchased new and have spared no expense keeping it up. I agree, that pre 2005 diesels have good engines, but the trucks themselves are wearing out and most need expensive repairs.
If I were buying new or near new, I would go with a gasser and a half tonner as well unless I had a giant Airstream.
Reasons: 1. Gassers cost a lot less new and used. 2. Gas is a little over 3.00 a gallon diesel is 3.80. 3. New diesels have a lot of power robbing, complex emission control technology, gassers have old proven technology. Very long term reliability of newer diesels is open to question. A newer gasser will get 200k miles easy 4. A 3/4 tonner either gas or diesel is a pain to drive downtown, a half tonner is easier. How many of us have a dedicated tow vehicle, most of the time we are going to be going solo and using the vehicle for something else.
Everyone is looking for a good used truck (you are competing with small business owners) and the prices for good used are high. Best values are in basic model leftover new trucks, particularly those that nobody wants like a Nissan Titan.
For that matter, why buy a truck at all? A larger SUV will tow almost as well carry all most as much and be a lot more versatile. There is usually more depreciation involved with an SUV, as well.
__________________
handn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2014, 08:22 AM   #21
Rivet Master
 
Skater's Avatar
 
1995 30' Excella
Bowie , Maryland
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 2,344
I'm more and more convinced the diesel costs us more money than the gas engine would.

handn basically covered it - diesels cost more to buy, more to fuel, and more to maintain (check out how much oil you need to fill it - mine takes 16 quarts; fuel filters have to be changed more often and are more expensive; air filters are expensive; two batteries instead of one; and so on).

Yes, you get more power, but there's an upper limit to what you really need unless you plan to go 100 mph up mountains while towing, and somewhat better fuel mileage, but I'm not convinced the improved mileage is enough to even offset the cost of the fuel, let alone the other expenses.

My next one will be gas, I've decided.
__________________
1995 Airstream Classic 30' Excella 1000
2014 Ram 2500 Crew Cab with Cummins 6.7L Diesel

Sold but not forgotten: 1991 Airstream B190
Sold: 2006 F-250 6.0L Powerstroke Supercab
Skater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2014, 08:53 AM   #22
4 Rivet Member
Commercial Member
 
acstokes's Avatar
 
2009 30' Classic
Melbourne, FL , Searsport, ME
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 309
Quote:
Everyone is looking for a good used truck (you are competing with small business owners) and the prices for good used are high.
Handn: What size trailer do you pull with your Excursion? I'm no expert, but I'd venture to say there's a reason diesels are popular and I personally would not want a gasser for anything 30' or more.
__________________
Fred Stokes
RV Rearview Camera Systems, LLC
WBCCI #2810
acstokes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2014, 09:07 AM   #23
Rivet Master
 
dznf0g's Avatar

 
2007 30' Classic
Oswego , Illinois
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 9,403
Images: 5
I can tell you from personal experience, the 6.0 and 6.2L gassers from GM handle my 30' CLASSIC (8500 - 9000lbs loaded) just fine. Is a diesel "faster" under load....sure. But the cost to benefit ratio for sub-11,000 - 12,000lb towables is questionable from a data standpoint. Personl preference is another matter.

I am SURE many of the competitors high torque/HP gassers are too.
__________________
-Rich-

"If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy." - Red Green
dznf0g is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2014, 08:23 PM   #24
Vintage Kin
 
slowmover's Avatar
 
Fort Worth , Texas
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 7,583
Images: 1
The "economy" of diesels -- from several angles -- left after the 2008 model year in the 3/4-1T series for those with light loads (around 10-12k lbs). From about that weight on up the competition from gassers doesn't really exist. An Airstream TT is a light load.
__________________
1990 35' Silver Streak Sterling; 9k GVWR.
2004 DODGE Cummins 305/555; 6-manual; 9k GVWR.
Hensley Arrow. 9-cpm solo, 15-cpm towing
Sold: Silver Streak Model 3411
slowmover is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2014, 11:59 AM   #25
3 Rivet Member
 
Cyberous's Avatar
 
2006 25' Safari FB SE
1995 21' Sovereign
Hollister , California
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 127
I just did this myself... Ended up with a 2006 Ford F-250.

I used Craigslist, Cars.com, autotrader.com and yahoo auto. I also purchased a carfax block so I could check history on trucks I was interested in.

I wanted a pre smog diesel so that meant something under 2007 for most manufactures. From what I saw the Dodge Cummins commanded the highest price, usually in the $35K+ range for a lower mileage loaded truck. The Ford was the cheapest usually in the $25K range for a lower mileage loaded truck. The GM product was somewhere in the middle of the two.

Once I decided I wanted a Ford I went to my local dealer and was able to talk with the actual diesel tech who would be the one to work on my future truck. He told me all of the ins and outs of the 6.0L and potential costs associated. He said if they are treated right they are a great truck, if they are abused they can be money pits. He suggested when I find the truck I like to bring it in for a prebuy inspection (under $200)

I assume all manufacturers will do the same, I would think a few hundred dollars is money well spent before you buy someone else's problems!

As for me, I was able to buy mine for $20,000 cash, 65000 miles / 1960 hours on the engine. It is a Lariat, loaded with every option, tires and brakes have less than 2000 miles on them. The owner had very thorough records all form the Ford dealer. (He even had the Dealer do his oil changes!) I guess time will tell if it was a smart purchase, but for now I'm a happy camper.
__________________
Cyberous is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2014, 12:14 PM   #26
Rivet Master
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 811
Quote:
Originally Posted by acstokes View Post
Handn: What size trailer do you pull with your Excursion? I'm no expert, but I'd venture to say there's a reason diesels are popular and I personally would not want a gasser for anything 30' or more.
I have one of those 6300 gvw Safaris which I could tow with a minivan according to our friends up north. My old Ex will tow nearly every hill in Colorado at the speed limit. With an exhaust brake, it will go down the same hill without any drama.
I agree anything with three axles would tow better with a diesel but a gas 3/4 ton truck has nearly the same tow rating as a diesel.
__________________
handn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2014, 12:41 PM   #27
2 Rivet Member
 
2014 25' Flying Cloud
Herkimer,NY , soon to be Keswick,VA
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 45
I'm a newbie here but I want to chime in, with a 25' FC that I have yet to pull. I found a 2011 Ram 2500 HD diesel with 12000 miles. Hoping I didn't make a mistake instead of gas. We are planning to spend lots of time out west and thought that both going up and down the Rockies, Tetons, Cascades etc. the diesel would 'perform' better. Guess only time will tell.
__________________
herkvet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2014, 12:55 PM   #28
Rivet Master
 
TinTin's Avatar
 
2009 23' FB Flying Cloud
Canmore , Alberta
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 1,762
Images: 6
Your new TV should prove to be a good match for your AS. The current price differential for diesel should be erased by the better mileage you'll achieve!
__________________

__________________
Bob and Nancy
http://www.rwcphoto.smugmug.com
Cheer Up, Slow Down, Chill Out!
TinTin is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.