Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-13-2008, 01:13 PM   #43
CLOUDSPLITTER Phone home
 
ROBERT CROSS's Avatar

 
2003 25' Classic
Zanadude Nebula , WNY
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 10,802
Images: 1
Thumbs up Great ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by ASchwager
I want to replace my 2000 Expedition as a tow vehicle for my 23 ft. AS. For various reasons, I want to stay with a SUV. Given this constraint, I would like to get the best horsepower and torque I can get. It seems that the GMC Denali with the 6.2 engine is the top candidate. Any recommendations? Has anyone had experience with the GMC Denali?


Did we scare ya' away?
__________________

__________________
"What you do speaks so loudly, no one can hear what you say"
M. Levy




So when is this..."old enough to know better" supposed to kick in?
ROBERT CROSS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2010, 09:45 AM   #44
1 Rivet Member
 
Anytown , New Hampshire
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 5
We have a 2005 Land Rover LR3...as said before, excellent tow vehicle. A few LR3's have a wimpy Ford V6, but they discontinued after 1 year. Ours has the 300hp Jaguar-built 4-cam V8 and the German-made ZF automatic with manual shift ability. The air suspension will level any load and when a trailer is plugged in the air suspension automatically firms up the rear air springs for towing duty and disables the systems ability to raise for off-roading. It also disables the rear parking sensors since they would go off steadily any time in reverse with a trailer immediately behind the bumper. Integrated trailer brake controller is available from Land Rover. The LR3 has excellent large disc brakes, ventilated on the front and rear wheels. Cooling system for engine and tranny more than up to the job. The LR3 weighs close to 3 tons which helps make it nice and stable. Huge enclosed ladder steel hydroformed frame integrated into body shell as well. The new LR4 replaces the LR3, but is essentially exactly the same vehicle except has a new 5.0L Jag 4-cam V8 making 375hp. Or buy similar Range Rover / Range Rover Sport as these have nearly identical chassis / suspension setups but the availability of supercharged engine variants: 390-510 horsepower.
__________________

__________________
troverman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2010, 11:41 AM   #45
2 Rivet Member
 
Dallas , Texas
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 63
^ My concern with the Land Rovers would be the short wheelbase. What size trailer are you pulling?
__________________
JakeSpoon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2010, 05:58 AM   #46
1 Rivet Member
 
Anytown , New Hampshire
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 5
24' tandem axle trailer, over 5,000lbs, and tongue weight of about 700lbs. The LR3 has a wheelbase of 114", not huge, but better than the earlier Discovery II or original Range Rover with 100" wheelbases. Latest versions have trailer sway control software. The LR3 / LR4 has a strange hitch...the whole receiver can be quickly removed from the frame crossmember in order to improve off-road departure angle...when installed it hangs down and looks strange. The hitch is rated as a Class III / IV...7716lbs tow rating and 770lb tongue load. The owners manual states 550lb max tongue load, although the Land-Rover part number only hitch states 770lbs. Although in towing the above trailer no problems were encountered I would be careful with the tongue load. The LR3's suspension will level even a very heavy hitch trailer (the rear air springs are much bigger than the front air springs; the rears actually resemble air ride on a semi except that they are encased in an aluminum shield) but the supporting pin on the removable hitch seems a little small. Using a weight-distributing hitch is a "no" according to the manual, but owners have successfully done it. It tends to confuse the air suspension system.
__________________
troverman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2010, 06:33 PM   #47
New Member
 
Currently Looking...
Clifton , Colorado
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1
I'm a newbie and looking to purchase a 16' Bambi or 16' International series. I am getting mixed answers as to whether my Lexus RX330 will tow it. The towing capacity is rated at 3,500 and the 16 foot Airstreams weigh 3,500 lbs. Anyone had experience with this combination?
Thanks,
Gene
__________________
Gene Zalar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2010, 06:45 PM   #48
2 Rivet Member
 
2008 23' International CCD
Denver , Colorado
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 99
Gene - we are pretty new to towing as of last summer. Here's what I know and have gleaned from towing our 23' CCD with a 4.0 liter 4Runner - 2003 model.
First check hitch capacity, tongue weight, etc. Make sure that's within the capacity of the Lexus. And confirm those numbers, as Toyota has published at least two sets of specs for the 4Runner. That was interesting.
Is the 3500 pounds for the 16' Bambi full weight or gross weight? Water weighs 8.3 pounds per gallon, something like that. Propane, food, clothes all add up. As do your options. So be sure you are calculating with a full trailer weight.
You don't want to be under powered, nor do you want your trailer swinging that Lexus around the road. Get stabilizer bars and anti sway bar for whatever hitch you buy.
Our 4 liter V6 pulls our trailer well on the flats; is stable and all; but in the mountains we have to gear down and keep it slow in the right lane. In our case a V8 would certainly be better but ours is a close match.
Good luck.
__________________
Jim and Marsha
"Stream of Consciousness"
AIR #35886
JimmyT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2010, 07:14 PM   #49
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,814
Gene, if the capacity of the Lexus is 3,500 (sounds like it's a 4Runner), then towing a 3,500 lb. trailer is at maximum leaving no room for error. Is that the dry weight or gross wt. of the Bambi? You could get by with Bambi if you take no water and minimum food and clothes assuming 3,500 lbs. is gross wt.

As for the 4Runner, they've offered it with two different engines—the V6 and the 4.7 L. V8. That may account for the different specs.

Gene
__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2010, 08:13 PM   #50
2 Rivet Member
 
nangoff's Avatar
 
2004 28' International CCD
Franklin , Tennessee
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 93
Will a Lexus RX330 will tow it

I doubt it....what is the load rating of the hitch, with an equalizer hitch? You need to get a really accurate, like call Airstream, for the weight on the ball of the receiver. Where you'll get in trouble with the car is the transmission temperature. The transmission and engine are mechanically strong enough to pull the trailer, where they will fail is overheating, mechanical ratings are always larger that thermal ratings.....especially the transmission. For sure get a transmission temp gage and additional trans cooling if you can get it. You'll also have to be comfortable at pulling the Colorado hills in first gear at 20 mph or so. This could be a little unnerving. All in all, probably too close a size match.
__________________
nangoff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2010, 08:20 PM   #51
1 Rivet Member
 
Shelton , Washington
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 5
What do you think for hauling a 31 ft Sovereign?
__________________
lynnmcmullen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2010, 09:02 PM   #52
4 Rivet Member
 
Grand Master's Avatar
 
1963 24' Tradewind
Anderson / Sun City , Indiana / Arizona
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 444
Jeep diesel update

Just finished a 4 month coast to coast trip with our Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland 3.0L Diesel towing a '63 Trade Wind (24'). We crossed the Smokeys once and the Rockies twice. We drove 60-65 mph on Interstates (unless posted 55).

We averaged 17.11 mpg calculated by dividing the miles driven (13,875) by the gallons purchased (811.039). The on-board computer consistently under-reported the mpg by about 1 mpg.

We utilized an equalizer hitch with 600 lb bars, and never experienced any sway. We even were caught in a severe wind storm in New Mexico where they closed the interstate because of the strong winds and dust.

All in all, we were very happy with the performance of the Jeep and the fuel mileage was better than we had hoped.

An unexpected advantage the diesel provided was downhill compression that allowed us to go down many steep grades with only occasional braking.
__________________
Grand Master is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2010, 09:15 PM   #53
2 Rivet Member
 
nangoff's Avatar
 
2004 28' International CCD
Franklin , Tennessee
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 93
Reprise: Basically transmission temperature is the weakest part of the drive train. If you can keep the transmission cool you can tow (al)most anything. Now, you may only be able to tow at 5 mph up steep climbs, and stop periodically to cool down, but you can tow. After that the hitch weight is the next weak link. You must do your best to minimize the weight off the cars rear axles and (associated) balance the car for handing.

I pull a 7,300# (empty) trailer with 1,050# tongue weight using a 5.3 liter, 4 speed, 3.73 rear end, 275 hp, 2001 Suburban with a Reese load equalizing hitch and have climbed 11,000 foot mountains. Albeit, I don't climb fast, but I get there. Put 100,000 miles on this configuration.
__________________
nangoff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2010, 09:16 PM   #54
Rivet Master
 
Soyboy's Avatar

 
1999 28' Excella
Frederick , Maryland
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 639
Images: 41
Grand Master: That mileage sounds great. Being a diesel fan with my Dmax and a VW TDI, I wish there more diesel choices for folks in the US. A nice V6 4L or so engine in a 1/2 truck or SUV would be great.

I was interested in the compression braking as most diesels don't have a throttle and therefore don't generate much vacuum when you back of the fuel (hence having vacuum pumps and exhaust or Jake type brakes). I wonder if Chrysler has incorporated a way of producing the effect with the 3.0. I know with my Dmax I have to watch it going down mountains, the Ally will downshift and do it's best, but without an exhaust brake you just have to keep your cool. My next truck will have an exhaust brake. I think Dodge has had one available on the RAM Cummins for a couple of years (I think) and I know GM is now offering one from the factory on the Dmax.

Again, that mileage sounds great, glad you had a good trip, I'm jealous!
__________________
1999 28' Safari
2012 F150 Platinum Max Tow 7650 GVWR 3.73 Elec. Locking Diff.(Prev 2003 Dmax).
Honda EU2000i, Equalizer Hitch
AM Solar Panels 150W - 2 Trojan T 105 6V Batteries
TAC MD-6
AIR 4534

On internet forums, please research and separate the wheat from the chaff (including mine!)
Soyboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2010, 11:09 PM   #55
Rivet Master
 
Road Ruler's Avatar
 
1973 23' Safari
St. Catharines , South Western Ontario
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 2,353
Images: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Zalar View Post
looking to purchase a 16' Bambi or 16' International series. I am getting mixed answers as to whether my Lexus RX330 will tow it
Thanks,
Gene
Post #21 here has some good info about the Lexus. Note it is a pro setup....http://www.airforums.com/forums/f463...d-39302-2.html
__________________
Airstreams..... The best towing trailers on the planet!
Road Ruler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2010, 10:24 AM   #56
Rivet Master
 
Gene's Avatar
 
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Grand Junction , Colorado
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 10,814
Is the Lexus RX330 a truck or a hybrid (car with SUV body = station wagon)? The Toyota 4Runner is a truck and the Hilander is a car (Camry with station wagon body style). The truck version has a ladder frame and it appropriate for a weight distributing hitch, but the car/station wagon version is very different and is not very good for towing. The Lexus is based on one of the Toyotas but I don't know which one.

Look under the Lexus and see if the hitch receiver is welded to the frame. Does the frame have two steel parallel beams running front to back attached by crossmembers? If so, it's a truck. If not, it would take some serious modifications to make it a real two vehicle.

Even if it is a truck, you are at the limit of tow capacity. What about tongue weight? What about payload of the Lexus? These have to be taken seriously as well. When you are at maximum tow capacity, you are likely at payload limit or above. Vehicles designed for towing (compared with ones that you can tow with, but that is not what they are often used for) have bigger alternators, bigger brakes, transmission coolers, tow mirrors, beefed up suspensions, etc. For going to a nearby park, the Lexus may be fine, but for a road trip, maybe not.

It is often said to not go over 80% of any limit for a safety margin. While there appears to be no scientific test of that number, it does provide a guide—leave some margin because it's safer in an emergency and doesn't overtax the tow vehicle.

Gene
__________________

__________________
Gene is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
which tow vehicle? wayne.yl Tow Vehicles 4 01-17-2006 12:06 AM
tow vehicle howardP Tow Vehicles 14 12-11-2004 01:49 PM
new tow vehicle whistler On The Road... 10 04-14-2004 07:07 PM
Tow Vehicle Myrjer Tow Vehicles 10 07-03-2003 07:55 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by



Our Communities

Our communities encompass many different hobbies and interests, but each one is built on friendly, intelligent membership.

» More about our Communities

Automotive Communities

Our Automotive communities encompass many different makes and models. From U.S. domestics to European Saloons.

» More about our Automotive Communities

Marine Communities

Our Marine websites focus on Cruising and Sailing Vessels, including forums and the largest cruising Wiki project on the web today.

» More about our Marine Communities


Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.