Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-24-2006, 10:42 PM   #1
Harry P
 
1995 36' Classic 36
Elk Grove Village , Illinois
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 7
RVing in Cold Weather

I'm sure that this subject has been discussed before, but I thought I would start a new thread. I would like to keep my 95 Airstream MH Classic 36 usable for some more cold weather trips. I will probably winterize in 2 to 3 weeks. I live in the Chicago area.

Question is, do you need to do anything for those cold (less than 32 degrees) nights while the MH is parked in the driveway to keep things from freezing?

At what temperature will damage occur? Has anyone had any problems leaving the rig watered at temps of say, 25 degress and up?

Thanks in advance for any advice you may have.
__________________

__________________
harryp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2006, 11:35 PM   #2
4 Rivet Member
 
2004 16' International CCD
1997 25' Safari
hamilton , Montana
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 387
Hi Harry,,, for certain,, leave your furnace running for starters,,, am sure others with motorhomes will post,,, i know about trailers and sorry that is about the extent of my knowledge,,, would worry more now about the roads than the unit,,,, take care,,, donna
__________________

__________________
dieterdog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2006, 12:52 AM   #3
Rivet Master
 
CaddyGrn's Avatar
 
1963 16' Bambi
Yreka , California
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,879
Water pipes freeze easily. Big (HUGE, actually) mess. Tons of work to repair. Open cupboard doors, drawers, etc. so warm air can circulate around pipes.

I do not know about your specific motorhome, but I would start with the water inlet and see where the pipes go... check to be sure none are on the "outside". Not sure about the gray water/black water issues. I know we had a older motorhome a number of years ago and the pipes froze. Took lots of repair. Do whatever it takes to avoid it! If the temp is below 45 I would turn a heater on!

Good luck!

Mrs. NorCal Bambi (traveling in S Tardis)
__________________
CaddyGrn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2006, 03:55 AM   #4
More than one rivet loose
 
thecatsandi's Avatar

 
Currently Looking...
Keymar , Maryland
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 3,754
Leave the furnace on! Not just the heat pump. The colder it gets outside the higher you will have to keep the thermostat.
__________________
Michelle TAC MT-0
Sarah, Snowball

Looking for a 1962 Flying Cloud

thecatsandi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2006, 06:38 AM   #5
4 Rivet Member
 
bobandcarla's Avatar
 
2005 25' Classic
Pelham , New Hampshire
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 445
I have a 2005 trailer and the manual says to leave the furnace on because the ducts run along with the pipes. Leaving cabinet doors open seems to work also.
__________________
Bob & Carla
05 classic 25'
WBCCI # 1836
bobandcarla is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2006, 06:52 AM   #6
Just an old timer...
 
85MH325's Avatar

 
Tipton , Iowa
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 4,031
Images: 37
Harry, your pipes can freeze in two hours at 32*.

RV anti-freeze costs about $3/gallon. It takes 10 mins to winterize, and you can do it again before you leave a park if necessary. Drain your tanks, winterize the plumbing and then just flush them when you're ready to take the moho out. Drain the tanks, and re-winterize again before you hit the road as your furnace may not be able to keep up with the outside temp around the tanks as you go down the road. Make sure you drain your black water tank first and THEN your gray water 'cause there won't be any fresh water around at dump stations this time of year to wash things down with.

Make sure when you're parked and using the moho that your propane tank is full when you start and your furnace is on all the time so it can vent warm air around the pipes and tanks.

We just got back from a five nighter with 25* temps and had a great time. I had winterized before I left, and re-winterized when we got back. Don't forget to take all freezables out of the moho too... canned foods, dish soap and cleaners, etc etc etc.

Happy camping!

Roger
__________________
AIR 2053 Current: 2006 Born Free 32 RQ Kodiak Chassis, & 1995 Coachmen B-van
Former Airstreams: 1953 Flying Cloud, 1957 Overlander, 1961 Bambi, 1970 Safari Special, 1978 Argosy Minuet, 1985 325 Moho, 1994 Limited 34' Two-door, 1994 B190 "B-Van"
85MH325 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2006, 10:25 AM   #7
Rivet Master
 
1975 29' Ambassador
Reno , Nevada
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,351
Water pipes don't freeze at 32F but thermometers can lie! ;-)

It takes sub freezing temperatures over time to freeze things. Most of your plumbing is protected to some degree inside your RV. That means mild overnight freezing temperatures won't usually cause harm inside your RV. Look at how long it takes a bowl of water to freeze in your home freezer set to 0F.

Mild overnight freezing temperatures can be when the average of the day's minimum and maximum temperatures stays above 30F. Or when the nighttime minimum stays above 20F to 25F. Below those markers, the risk of freezing rapidly increases.

Most plumbing these days is PEX and that will handle some freezing without damage. Fixtures and fittings may not. The worst damage is when things like water heater tanks or water filters freeze up but it takes quite a freeze to get those.

Running the furnace is one way to help reduce the risk of freeze damage. I just wish RV furnace thermostats had a 'keep alive' setting so they'd hold a 35-40F temperature but most don't. A 1kw or so electric heater with fan and open cabinets will also help reduce freezing risk but take care for all the usual hazards.

It's not until the temperatures get down to the teens and lower that you really need to start worrying about things. See the page on Warmth for some ideas and links.
__________________
bryanl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2006, 10:50 AM   #8
Rivet Master<br><img src="/ugala/forums/images/5rivet.gif">
 
CanoeStream's Avatar

 
2006 25' Safari FB SE
St. Cloud , Minnesota
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 13,279
Images: 19
Blog Entries: 3
Maybe you saw this thread of the last few days. Although Chaplain Kent isn't available this week he takes the approach of just blowing out the pipes and putting antifreeze in the traps. That could work but I worry about water settling back into low areas and freezing. Still, a lot of us own oil-free compressors to do this job ourself on a moment's notice. I've done recent camping down into the upper 20's like Roger -- it's easy if you are keeping it warm for humans. You won't be happy running the furnace in the driveway for any prolonged period of time but that certainly is an effective solution. Open the lower cabinets as you are reading here.

I'm pretty certain that inside temps would nearly equalize with outside after a long winter night and could freeze up solid in those pre-dawn coldest hours. The negative consequences are so expensive and time consuming that it wouldn't be safe giving you a lowest recommended temperature. I'd definitely worry about 25 degrees.

Only the forced air RV furnace will put duct heat under your cabinets where the pipes are. A space heater will not. Heat rises, etc. I would take a lot more precautions if you observe that you have copper pipes. They are highly subject to freeze damage.
__________________
Bob

5 meter Langford Nahanni

CanoeStream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2006, 11:35 AM   #9
Rivet Master
 
1975 29' Ambassador
Reno , Nevada
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,351
Quote:
I worry about water settling back into low areas and freezing.
The biggest concern is water collecting in the fixtures. I have lost mixing valves on the shower due to freezing.

We often get nighttime lows in the 20-25F range that don't cause any freezing in my trailer. Highs are usually 55-60F or more. I only worry when a storm goes through and the lows get into the teens and highs in the low 40's and it stays that way for a few days.

Even the oil-free compressors can introduce contaminants.

See Winterizing the plumbing at the SNUZE weblog for more.
__________________
bryanl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2006, 12:28 PM   #10
Moderator
 
jcanavera's Avatar

 
2004 30' Classic Slideout
Fenton , Missouri
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 9,002
Images: 143
Send a message via AIM to jcanavera Send a message via Skype™ to jcanavera
The other thought is the amount of propane you will expend to stay warm. We just went through 3 days of some of the coldest weather we have ever camped in. Now we have been overnight where the water hose froze, but in essance it was just overnight.

The last three days we were in cloudy rainy weather with temps dropping as low as thirty and highs just approaching 40 with winds blowing between 10-30 mph over the open Illinois corn fields. While we started out using the heat pump we pretty much stayed on furnace the entire trip with the thermostat set for 72 in the daytime and 70 at night. I left St. Louis with only one propane tank full with the other tank emptying just before we left town (when I tested to make sure the furnace ran). We kept the shades and curtain's closed to conserve heat. While we were warm inside, as soon as the furnace cycled off, you felt the cold coming from the walls. A thermometer on the dinette close to the windows registered a temperature about 2-3 degrees lower than the inside center of the trailer. Bottom line, unless the furnace was running, the outside cold was noticable. The furnace during the coldest times was cycling at least once every 5 minutes and ran at least 2-3 minutes to bring the temp up to setpoint. In those three days we used half a 30 lb. bottle of gas.

So those of you who are cold weather campers, you have my admiration. Personally I find no joy in it and this weekend we winterize and await the warmth of the spring.

Jack
__________________
Jack Canavera
STL Mo.
AIR #56
'04 Classic 30' S.O.,'03 GMC Savana 2500,'14 Honda CTX 700
jcanavera is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2006, 12:49 PM   #11
Rivet Master<br><img src="/ugala/forums/images/5rivet.gif">
 
CanoeStream's Avatar

 
2006 25' Safari FB SE
St. Cloud , Minnesota
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 13,279
Images: 19
Blog Entries: 3
Yes Jack, I hear you loud and clear! Two weeks ago we left home in 27-28 degree temps and the furnace running. I can only imagine how much that furnace burned during the 6 hour drive that followed. I stopped once and went inside; driving at 60mph must have been pulling that heat out pretty bad. We started with a half-full LP tank -- finished it completely after Night 2 of the adventure. I was just glad I filled the other tank as a final measure before leaving home. One gets complacent when a half tank lasts a month or more in the summer.
__________________
Bob

5 meter Langford Nahanni

CanoeStream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2006, 02:37 PM   #12
Moderator
 
jcanavera's Avatar

 
2004 30' Classic Slideout
Fenton , Missouri
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 9,002
Images: 143
Send a message via AIM to jcanavera Send a message via Skype™ to jcanavera
In my case with the electric/gas water heater and the heat pump, our usage is pretty minimal. The tank that finally ran out last weekend has been in use for a year and a half. So this 3 day run is really the most that the furnace has run since I bought this trailer.....and obviously I now know why they put twin 30 gallon tanks on this trailer.

Jack
__________________
Jack Canavera
STL Mo.
AIR #56
'04 Classic 30' S.O.,'03 GMC Savana 2500,'14 Honda CTX 700
jcanavera is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2006, 02:47 PM   #13
Tom, the Uber Disney Fan
 
Minnie's Mate's Avatar
 
2006 30' Safari
Orlando , Florida
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 4,693
Images: 7
This advise is very timely. I was going to post this same type of question. I live in the South Metro area of Atlanta. We get upper 20's - low 30's but not much colder for more than a night or two at a time and not that often. I thought blowing out the water lines and draining all the tanks (including hot water) and remove the water filter would be sufficient if I ran the furnace when the temps dropped below the 30 degree mark. Does that sound right or do I need to put in anti-freeze?
__________________
2006 30' Safari - "Changes in Latitudes"
2008 F-250 Lariat Power Stroke Diesel Crew Cab SWB
Family of Disney Fanatics
WBCCI# 4821
http://streaminacrossamerica.com/
Minnie's Mate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2006, 02:59 PM   #14
Moderator
 
jcanavera's Avatar

 
2004 30' Classic Slideout
Fenton , Missouri
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 9,002
Images: 143
Send a message via AIM to jcanavera Send a message via Skype™ to jcanavera
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnie's Mate
This advise is very timely. I was going to post this same type of question. I live in the South Metro area of Atlanta. We get upper 20's - low 30's but not much colder for more than a night or two at a time and not that often. I thought blowing out the water lines and draining all the tanks (including hot water) and remove the water filter would be sufficient if I ran the furnace when the temps dropped below the 30 degree mark. Does that sound right or do I need to put in anti-freeze?
As long as you have access to the trailer to easily turn on the furnace, this should do the trick. Turning on the furnace in April or October is something I do when we are in freezing temps and I have water in the system. If the freeze is especially hard, I also turn on the water heater. In your case since you have already blown out the lines, the running of the furnace should suffice. In my case it's a real stop gap situation, especially if the trailer is in the storage yard where I have no access to 110. In those cases it's usually a one night affair and the batteries can carry me through. In these cases I set the thermostat at 50 and open up the cabinet's to let the air get to the piping. That minimizes run time to conserve battery power.

Jack
__________________

__________________
Jack Canavera
STL Mo.
AIR #56
'04 Classic 30' S.O.,'03 GMC Savana 2500,'14 Honda CTX 700
jcanavera is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
weather stripping Londoner Windows, Doors, Locks & Vents 7 07-13-2008 09:03 PM
cold weather how do air streams do? overlander Our Community 2 10-02-2002 06:10 AM
Two ?'s Furnace and weather stripping escapeez Leaks - Weatherstrips, Gaskets, Caulks & Sealants 2 09-15-2002 07:10 PM
Need new weather stripping kit lizh Windows & Screens 8 08-30-2002 08:49 PM
Window Screen Weather Stripping ??? niftypkg Windows & Screens 0 06-03-2002 07:28 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.