Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 08-14-2007, 07:11 PM   #1
2 Rivet Member
 
2008 25' Safari SS SE
Longview , Washington
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 48
Images: 2
Northwest winter travel

I'm buying my first airstream on Monday, a 2005 Safari LS 22', and I'm very excited. I have a few questions, some of which I've seen complicated answers to in other threads.
First, can anyone tell me whether it is necessary to winterize my trailer in Southwest Washington? At what time of year/temperature is it needed? Also, I would like to use the trailer for extended weekends skiing at Mt. Hood Meadows ski resort, and I was wondering what steps I would need to do this in potentially lousy weather up there. I wouldn't have it up there for more than 2 nights at a time in the winter, but would like to be able to use the plumbing if possible. I appreciate any advice you can offer.

Matt
__________________

__________________
msmst25 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2007, 07:46 PM   #2
Rivet Master
 
Fyrzowt's Avatar
 
2000 25' Safari
West of Fort Worth , Texas
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 6,697
Images: 8
Matt, welcome!
I wish I could help you, I don't have to worry too much about camping in the snow here. Therefore, anything I tell you would be hearsay. I'll wait awhile - if nobody responds I'll give you hearsay.
Nice to have you on the forum!
Dave
__________________

__________________
Fyrzowt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2007, 07:51 PM   #3
Rivet Master<br><img src="/ugala/forums/images/5rivet.gif">
 
CanoeStream's Avatar

 
2006 25' Safari FB SE
St. Cloud , Minnesota
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 13,279
Images: 19
Blog Entries: 3
Hello Matt - Welcome to the Forums! You will need to be winterized in any conditions dipping into the low 20s. I have found that pulling a trailer in cold conditions is much more chilling than having it parked. There is actually a wintering subforum where you started your thread that has a lot of information. Batteries perform poorly in cold, so a plug-in is almost mandatory if you want to use the furnace. Condensation is a big issue unless you leave a window or vent partly open -- that's just not much fiberglass insulation and there are no thermal breaks at the ribs. Without a lot of arrangements you are left with something functioning at the level of an aluminum tent.

I don't think any combination of studded tires and the most perfect antisway gear is going to make towing in mountain and snow conditions safe -- that's just a personal opinion from another snowy state. The first 'oops' will make that $500 a night condo seem mighty cheap. Road salt is aggressive on aluminum. I backpacked & beach camped in Hawaii a lot -- any new equipment with aluminum would be severely corroded by salt spray after the first trip. There are countless threads about alloy wheels, handles, hinges & skins that have problems with their clearcoat (search: filiform corrosion). Unless you find a disposable Airstream you can store up there, I would follow the Harley Rule advice -- don't bring it out in the spring until after the first good rain storm washes the roads clean.
__________________
Bob

5 meter Langford Nahanni

CanoeStream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2007, 08:22 PM   #4
Moderator
 
Stefrobrts's Avatar

 
1968 17' Caravel
Battle Ground , Washington
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 11,906
Images: 50
Blog Entries: 1
Hi Matt! Welcome to the forum, and to AS ownership!

I am no expert, but I've had my airstream for five years, and here's what I do - drain all the water out, blow the pipes out with compressed air, plug the trailer in, and leave a small electric heater running inside when the temps really drop. I don't know that the heater is absolutely necessary, but
it has kept it from getting that musty smell inside, and it's not that much electric to keep it dry inside. If it gets damp inside I set up a small dri-z-air.

There's still time to get a spot at Beverly Beach and join all the locals for the big end-of-season party! Come on down!

Oh, and the 'Crawford' in my profile is kind of a joke - I'm in Battle Ground, right down the road from you
__________________
Stephanie




Stefrobrts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-2007, 08:31 PM   #5
4 Rivet Member
 
DFord79's Avatar
 
Currently Looking...
Yakima , Washington
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 381
Quote:
Originally Posted by msmst25
I'm buying my first airstream on Monday, a 2005 Safari LS 22', and I'm very excited. I have a few questions, some of which I've seen complicated answers to in other threads.
First, can anyone tell me whether it is necessary to winterize my trailer in Southwest Washington? At what time of year/temperature is it needed? Also, I would like to use the trailer for extended weekends skiing at Mt. Hood Meadows ski resort, and I was wondering what steps I would need to do this in potentially lousy weather up there. I wouldn't have it up there for more than 2 nights at a time in the winter, but would like to be able to use the plumbing if possible. I appreciate any advice you can offer.

Matt
Yes,,,it needs to be winterized. The temps in Southestern Washington (west of the cascades) will drop into the teens or below in the winter. If you going to MT hood to winter ski....you could see temps below zero. If you'r comming to Eastern Washington or Eastern Oregon in Winter the temps can sometimes be well below zero in the dead of winter. Anywhere in the northwest winterizing is a must.
__________________
DFord79 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2007, 12:51 AM   #6
_
 
. , .
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 8,812
hi matt

it might be good to read the 'winter threads' just to get some ideas about winter camping in the colder parts of america...

i disagree with almost everything posted here so far on northwest winter camping, stef's routine is good IF you aren't gonna use the trailer.

camped for 10+ winters in washington/oregon/montana and didn't once winterize.

regularly boondocked in parking lots at crystal, mt hood, mt baker, snoqualamie and big mountain montana and lots of x-c spots off in the woods.

i had a moho then so chains made pass crossing much easier.

took a winter trip around the olympic peninsula every year and

spent several weeks each year winter camping on the sands of the beaches west of longview.

you need PLENTY of lpgas and juice (batteries/genset) or shore power.

a catalytic heater is a wonderful thing, properly installed, vented and used.

you need to learn how to vent the condensation and moisture.

last i checked bob, they don't use much salt on the roadways in washington or oregon, relying on sand/coal dust/and snow plows at the passes.

and seldom is there snow on any of the roads in/out of the ski areas for more than a few hours, since they need customers....

almost never any snow along the washington coast proper...well there was that winter (85?) with 20 inches of snow right down to the peninsula surf,

wow what a trip that was around the olympics.

but ocean air/surf salt is an issue year.

some of the ski areas now have hookups so that's easier, but most don't allow free boondocking like the old days.

many rv campgrounds are open and empty in the off season.

IF you are only staying for 1-2 nights it might be easier to fill your water lines with antifreeze and just carry bottles/jugs for daily use.

but if you really wanna winter camp in the northwest, just learn how and prepare for the adventure.

it is a special season for rving and most modern airstreams can handle it with some planning.

don't forget the photos...

cheers
2air'

one caveat,
the 22 footer will have a floor made from osb/chip board so it doesn't tolerate wet very well.

condensation not handled properly will eventually reach the floor.
__________________
all of the true things that i am about to tell you are shameless lies. l.b.j.

we are here on earth to fart around. don't let anybody tell you any different. k.v.
2airishuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2007, 07:23 PM   #7
3 Rivet Member
 
1969 31' Sovereign
atlanta , Georgia
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 110
Images: 6
another skier

2air - great post and thanks for the info. I will be leaving in two weeks for winterpark, copper & steamboat - 1 month of skiing - can't wait. I've done a good amount of research on this site and built in some extra provisions. Actually, there is another forum member who also has given e great advice and tips - search in the inter living section - she and her husband wintered in steamboat last year and I think may be doing it again this year.
__________________
nunya001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2007, 07:38 PM   #8
_
 
. , .
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 8,812
hey nunya'

i've found that spraying a little veggie oil (or olive pam) on outside water fittings to be very helpful during winter travel.

have a great trip!

i'm more of a crested butte and black canyon of the gunnison type in the mile high state,

but i'd love to spend 2 months (jan and july) a year near steamboat, biking and sliding

so WHERE are the pictures of your trailer make over?

and how 'bout some winter fun ones after u arrive!

cheers
2air'
__________________
all of the true things that i am about to tell you are shameless lies. l.b.j.

we are here on earth to fart around. don't let anybody tell you any different. k.v.
2airishuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2007, 12:55 PM   #9
3 Rivet Member
 
1969 31' Sovereign
atlanta , Georgia
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 110
Images: 6
2air - thanks for the tip - as soon as the project is done i will post a ton of pics and will also document my trip daily - might need to hit you up for some more advice soon.
__________________
nunya001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2007, 02:52 PM   #10
_
 
. , .
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 8,812
another winter issue is the shower trap.

the sink traps are inside the main unit so freezing is unlikely if the heat is on....

the shower trap isn't usually in a heated space so depending on insulation (mine had NONE) it can freeze up.

if it's cold enough (below 15-20F) this can happen DURING a shower, ask me how i know....

so IF you still have access insulate the shower trap/pan...

of course winter camping means less bathing anyway...

woolen undies tend not to stink with weeks of wear...

and save water, take a vodka sponge bath!

cheers
2air'
__________________
all of the true things that i am about to tell you are shameless lies. l.b.j.

we are here on earth to fart around. don't let anybody tell you any different. k.v.
2airishuman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2007, 03:49 PM   #11
3 Rivet Member
 
billberk's Avatar
 
2007 20' Safari SE
Springfield , Missouri
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 218
2air - I never pegged you as the woolen undies type.

Bill
__________________
billberk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2007, 04:12 PM   #12
3 Rivet Member
 
1969 31' Sovereign
atlanta , Georgia
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 110
Images: 6
That's good to know as well - I didn't retain any of the original bathroom and built my shower drain and out pipe to drain directly out to the site drain pipe - (sorry for the newbie terminology) - I also built in a valve to cut it off completely. That said if I'm boondocking I'll need to drain it into an external tank. I do have access and I will double check the insulation. I just got my fleece curtains for all the windows - hpefully keep my a little warmer. Did you ever think about doing a skirt around the bottom?
__________________
nunya001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2007, 04:15 PM   #13
Site Team
 
Janet H's Avatar

 
1964 26' Overlander
1964 19' Globetrotter
Eastern , Washington
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 12,444
Images: 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2airishuman
woolen undies tend not to stink with weeks of wear...
Fingers in ears, hands over eyes, singing la la la la la la at the top of my lungs now!
__________________
1964 Overlander | '08 Touareg V6
Current Project: 1964 Globetrotter

.
Let's have a polishing party: I'll supply the trailer and buffing supplies. BYOB (bring your own buffer)

AirForums Custom Search
Janet H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2007, 05:36 PM   #14
Rivet Master
 
mandolindave's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 2,115
Images: 4
Sometimes I camp in freezing weather.

It's a pain in the neck to unwinterise and rewinterize in freezing temps ( and I don't want to take a chance with my plumbing freezing should I lose power which would mean that I lose heat ). Instead I use a porta potti for waste issues, and plastic containers for washing water.

A word to the wise about woolen underwear. Make sure that they are balanced underwear, which help prevent posterioratic rashes.
NOBODY better ask for pictures!!!!!!!!!!!!
__________________

__________________
mandolindave is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Airstreams in winter?? Curtis-79MH Airstream Motorhome Forums 6 03-27-2006 01:58 PM
Broken Travel Lock Charcigar Doors & Locks 2 06-08-2004 09:23 AM
Travel on 1 axle. Over59 Axles 6 04-18-2004 05:22 PM
Trailer Travel, a visual history of mobile America 83Excella Our Community 6 08-20-2002 08:13 AM
Winter in an Airstream ????? Boris Carlove Our Community 9 08-04-2002 08:58 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.