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Old 11-29-2019, 03:28 PM   #1
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hole in roof for wood stove question

Hi.

Hopefully this isn't a dumb question. I have searched but couldn't find the answer anywhere.

We have a 2016 30' Flying Cloud Bunk model. We are installing a Cubic Mini wood stove and need to cut a 7" hole in the roof (yikes, I know!).

My question is, how do we know where the frame of the AS is? I want to make sure the spot we've picked is all clear.

thanks!
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Old 11-29-2019, 03:59 PM   #2
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Rivets in a straight line show where the wall/roof framing occurs
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Old 11-29-2019, 04:06 PM   #3
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I assume you mean "how to find the frame from INSIDE without tearing anything out"?


One method that you might try… Drill a small hole dead center of where you want the flue to exit the trailer, then poke a stiff wire up through the hole. Then go outside and find the hole with the wire sticking up through it. The frame is easy to find from outside, of course, because that's where the rivets are.

And if it turns out that the planned flue location IS too close to a framing member, then you can patch the hole you drilled with a single rivet (from outside), and no real harm done.
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Old 11-29-2019, 04:21 PM   #4
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We installed a Dickinson propane fireplace and had to put a 3” hole through the roof. Aside from the ribs you will want to avoid cutting any wiring or interference with the ducted air.
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Old 11-29-2019, 06:10 PM   #5
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Hi

Indeed, there's a lot more to avoid than just framing members. You are pretty much certain to hit insulation. That needs to be moved back from the chimney. There are a lot of wires running here and there. Again, they need to be kept *way* back from a hot stove outlet.

Since the skin of the trailer is very heat conductive, you will need a heat break between the chimney and the skin. That may be part of the stove kit, if not, something will need to be made up. The caulk between the chimney and skin has the same issues with lots of heat as all the other stuff .....

Indeed this sounds like a lot of hassle. You do *not* want to set your trailer on fire (or even have a bad roof leak).

Bob
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Old 11-29-2019, 09:31 PM   #6
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I would think he would run a triple wall pipe through the roof.
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Old 11-29-2019, 09:35 PM   #7
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Have you read the information about the stove? 20" clearance in ALL directions, mount the feet on something other than the floor (heat transfer), window open while operating.


You can drill a hole, as mentioned above, but I'd suggest a simpler method. Pick where the center of the hole should be, then measure from a window. Suppose that the spot you pick is 6" rearward of the edge of the window and 30" toward the center. Go outside and see what's 6" rearward of the edge of the window. Is there a row of rivets in the way, or near by? If not, chances are that you are good. Measure the other distance just to be sure.


Don't know how helpful the factory would be, but you could always ask them what's in the ceiling in that area. Your local dealer's service department may also be able to help.
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Old 11-30-2019, 10:10 AM   #8
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I think your nuts ��. If you want a wood stove get a different kind of trailer. Or buy an old airstream and mess that one up. Not a $100,000 new one
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Old 11-30-2019, 10:33 AM   #9
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With so little info in the question , kinda feel the need to say find a professional to do the install !
How cold do you expect to see ?
What are your installation ideas ?
Are you planning to not use your plumbing ?
Are planning on not using the propane furnace ?

Lots of reasons - Small space & earlier mentioned 20" space around , including fire-proof space on floor larger than the stove .

I have been living in MN winters & other cold teens - sub -0 temps , in Airstreams , buses
etc. and have used wood stoves in all but the Airstream .
I would suggest removing a window & building a insulated panel to pass the exhaust pipe through the window [ and make so that the pipe can be removed to travel down the road ] .

The hole point is that this is dangerous in so many ways that just giving 1 or 2 suggestions WHEN MANY MORE ARE NEEDED , you need to build a fresh air intake also - you do not want to burn the air from within the trailer !
In buses & other trailers with floor exposed to outside - I have used a hole saw 3" to pipe air into the stove [ THIS STOVE DOES NOT APPEAR TO HAVE THE OPTION FOR FREASH AIR INTAKE ? ] !!!

If you have the resources to get a new-er trailer , then you should have the resources to have it done correctly .

If you are fixed on going through the roof , look for a sheet-metal nibbler - to help avoid cutting things in the wall that you do not want to cut .
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Old 11-30-2019, 11:02 AM   #10
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See post #8 and #9 above. Not a good idea. No room. But if you persist, then please also consider what will happen if you pull this down the road. You will need to put a tight cap on the chimney otherwise the air draft will either suck the ashes out, or, hopefully not, pull air in and with it the ashes in the stove. You may need to bolt the stove to the floor, unless you intend on removing the stove when you want to travel. Also the size of the stove means it will not hole much wood, so you will be up putting wood in the stove every 45 minutes to hour at least.

When I was a kid we had a wood stove, much bigger than yours, and we had to feed wood in at least 1x in the middle of the night to keep it warm enough to not freeze the water pipes. The chimney caught on fire more than once due to creosote build up. My Dad would let it burn, would not even bother to call the fire department. Very dangerous to allow this to happen. Did not burn the house down.

Maybe a pellet stove with a hopper to feed pellets might be a better way to go.

If you decide to actually install this would you please send pictures of the final assembly?
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Old 11-30-2019, 11:14 AM   #11
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Thank you everyone! Much appreciated and very helpful.

I appreciate the words of caution as well, we have thoroughly researched and I do have a professional helping me do the install. But I like to triple check everything myself before getting started on a project.
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Old 11-30-2019, 11:51 AM   #12
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wow - there are so many very effective, clean and efficient heaters (propane, kerosene, diesel) that are easy to install in a small space. Why in the world would you choose one of the most difficult to install and one that requires unbelievable open space, is lease effective and dirtiest heater types for a small space like an Airstream. We heated a 36' sail boat in Toronto with a wall mounted Dickinson Kerosene Heater for several winters when we lived on board.
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Old 11-30-2019, 12:09 PM   #13
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What’s to understand...it’s a mini wood stove.

I understand completely wanting to have one of these, and would myself if I could.

Go for it, I say!

Maggie
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Old 11-30-2019, 12:13 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnTF View Post
The hole point is that this is dangerous in so many ways that just giving 1 or 2 suggestions WHEN MANY MORE ARE NEEDED , you need to build a fresh air intake also - you do not want to burn the air from within the trailer !
In buses & other trailers with floor exposed to outside - I have used a hole saw 3" to pipe air into the stove [ THIS STOVE DOES NOT APPEAR TO HAVE THE OPTION FOR FREASH AIR INTAKE ? ] !!!
The fresh air intake is widely blown out of proportion, if your airstream is actually sealed so well that the stove fails to draft then you might consider one, but try it first as that's unlikely.

You're not going to somehow suck all the oxygen out of the airstream without also filling the airstream with smoke

Do have a carbon monoxide detector nearby but that's a must for everyone


For my install I used a 6" hole saw, the wiring usually runs down the center of the roof then splits off and runs straight down to where it is needed. Supports are identified by the lines of rivets, inside and out

If you're not comfortable there are various guides online
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Old 11-30-2019, 04:01 PM   #15
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Best thing I've ever installed in my Airstream was a wood stove. You wont regret the joy. My double wall outlet has probably never got hotter than boiling point.

If you remove the center section and some rivets in the top skin you should be able to get a view enough to see any wires etc. Failing that, if pretty sure your good but want to be on the safe side. Mark the hole on the inside first and cut a piece out by drilling small holes around the perimeter of the large hole until you can break away the sheet. That way the worst that can happen is you end up with a hole to patch on the inside of your trailer. And if there is wires you can move them out of the way.

As mentioned. If your certain you're good. A hole saw makes easy work.
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Old 11-30-2019, 11:18 PM   #16
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Cubic Mini Inadequate Thermal Mass?

You didn't mention if opting for the Cubic Cub or Grizzly model. These stainless steel shelf mounted stoves are very small and offer minimal thermal mass, and have an extremely limited duration of burn. They have no viable cooking surfaces either.

The lower the stove is mounted, the greater the thermal radiation. The Cubic Cub needs constant stoking, however, it is likely too small for your trailer for adequate heating or duration of burn time unless you're an insomniac. There are other small wood stoves that offer greater thermal mass to make it through the evening without having to stoke them constantly, provide more heat, and keep your feet warm too.
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Old 12-01-2019, 06:04 AM   #17
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Hi

There are multiple reasons for the fresh air intake.

If you don't have one, you are pulling very cold air into the trailer and a lot of it. You are warm by the stove and cold far away from the stove. Hmmm.... what's far away from the stove .... (pipes and tanks for one ). Hot right by the fire is an issue to some degree with a simple stove, no matter what you do.

You can get CO buildup, it is unlikely.

If you are depending on a multi wall chimney, it needs air flow in the outer part of the structure. Restrict that air flow and the outer wall gets hot.

I've heated a house with wood. It does work. It also is a lot of work. If you are chopping down trees for various reasons, you will have a supply of wood to burn. Free fuel is a great thing.

Bob
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Old 12-08-2019, 11:38 AM   #18
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What??? No way!! Lots of better options out there for a trailer.
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Old 12-08-2019, 12:23 PM   #19
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What??? No way!! Lots of better options out there for a trailer.
My feelings also about wood stoves in AS. I have 2 wood stoves in house 1 wood burning fire place & 1 converted to gas. I love wood burners for house only...
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Old 12-08-2019, 12:52 PM   #20
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Wood stove

If you must install a wood stove you can remove the glass from the window and run it out thru the window. Just get a non-flammable material such as thin sheet metal or tile backer board to replace your glass
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