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Old 10-25-2012, 09:31 AM   #29
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Rednax,

We are thinking about trying out the 3M window films. We have 12 windows ( counting the little view ones below the bigger ones) and 9 of them open. We want to be able to open a few for those 60 degree winter days we get in colorado. This stuff looks like it would work well and seal off most of the window drafts. Going to maybe try to put some on this weekend.

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Old 10-26-2012, 05:23 PM   #30
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Rednax, I like the window covers... but what surprised me more, a 80's Toyota 4runner pulling that thing!
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Old 10-28-2012, 11:00 PM   #31
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Curious the make/model of your wood stove?

Would love to see and hear more about your experience with this!

We are trying to make our '66 Overlander as Off-Grid as possible and wood is a great option for both heat & cooking.

Happy Winter!
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Old 10-29-2012, 03:57 PM   #32
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Well there are RV specific wood stoves, By Marine Stoves and the Kimberly woodstove. Both of these options are pricey, like WAY pricey. I bought a Morso 1410 Coal Model, which I am really in love with right now, I hope I continue to be after I get it going.

Marine Stoves by Navigator Stove Works: Traditional Cast Iron Marine Stoves by Navigator Stove Works,Inc.

Kimberly woodstove:Unforgettable Fire LLC | Home of Kimberly, the Stove with a Social Conscience

and my wood stove (the morso):Morsø 1410

The Morso is NOT trailer approved! But I am sure it will be fine, I have a big piece of granite hearth and double wall pipe that will act as a fresh air inlet, and protect the walls from heat. The Morso, although pricey with the double wall pipe, is still about $1,000 less than the above two options.
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Old 10-29-2012, 05:05 PM   #33
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Your Morso is a good looking stove! As you get it installed and use it be sure to give an update!

I like the size and weight of the Kimberly...but its hard to justify spending more on a stove than I did for my trailer.

Thanks for the info!

If you don't mind sharing what are you doing in Alaska?
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Old 10-29-2012, 06:15 PM   #34
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Quote:
If you don't mind sharing what are you doing in Alaska?
Well, living! My husband and I needed to move for job/ economic reasons, and Alaska, for us, was the place to go. The trailer became an idea after we got up here. I work here in Anchorage, my husband works out in the "bush" like so many Alaskans do, so for this winter, it is mostly little 'ol me. Eventaully, we would like to split our time with lower 48 desert, or Mexico, and here. Or build a cabin, and our trailer can be the guest house/ road tripper. We also did the trailer thing in the lower 48, but started living in "normal" houses when we had trouble finding places to park (I don't think we tried hard enough). I don't want to encourage more people in Alaska... but it pretty much is awesome here. Bad weather, but awesome, absolutely amazing, for outdoors people.
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Old 10-29-2012, 08:16 PM   #35
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The stove in our trailer. It is hard to see the really cool squirrel on the side, but I think it fits well!
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Old 11-05-2012, 12:21 PM   #36
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Comfy in the single digits last night (I saw 7 degrees on the truck temp gauge this morning), and still no wood stove!
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Old 11-05-2012, 12:59 PM   #37
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Sounds like you have the right background for wintering in Alaska.

I noticed an electric heater in one of your posts. I do not recommend using these. It is by far the most expensive heat and they can be dangerous so close to flammable materials. I have done some winter camping and I do recommend an electric blanket with a good down quilt over it to keep the heat in.

I do like Paula's idea of a secondary straw bail structure, but maybe with your experience you won't need it.

I did not see the outside combustion air inlet for the stove. I like your stove. If miners could live in a tent with a coal stove, it should be a piece of cake living in your trailer (for the experienced miners that is).

Stay warm, but stay safe. Make sure all exhaust is safely piped to the outside.

Dan
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Old 11-12-2012, 02:17 PM   #38
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WOOD/ COAL STOVE is in, and absolutely awesome. Easily gets the room temperature too hot. The last two evenings the "living room" was about 80 degrees and 65 degrees first thing in the morning after less attention. I believe this stove will really keep a nice temperature even in the coldest days. All ice, and cold air pockets gone. The install seems very safe, no where is getting hot to touch (besides the pipe itself). The mounting brackets for the pipe are on the piece of aluminum we got cut for the window, so nothing was altered on the trailer, and it can easily be removed.
[IMG]
WARM! by waywardcatphoto, on Flickr[/IMG]
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Old 11-12-2012, 10:50 PM   #39
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One of the things about first having a wood stove is that they are so fun to use that fire tends to become recreational. . Ya want to keep refueling just for the thrill of watching it burn.


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Old 11-13-2012, 09:25 AM   #40
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Getting heat greedy with coal can be outright terrifying if/when its been over loaded and it all decides to catch at once. Don't allow people unaccustomed to coal to load the fire!

There is an ART to building up the right ash bed from wood and getting a central column area of coal hot enough to burn chunks completely yet be able to stack a few new pieces into the matrix to pre-heat & ignite without collapsing & quenching the core. Done smartly a small bucket of coal can last a day or two.

When I was seriously cold and needed the fire ASAP I experimented with coal nuggets, chips and dust in rolled up & knotted newspaper, with hardwood chips mixed in - not to really ignite the coal but for the ash to hold it in place while a hot wood fire got the 'heat' going. It is that pre-heat that causes the coal to outgass and start to start the true burning, the layers of glowing coal & ash then work inward as a slow motion blue-hot hissing burn that can melt common metals.

In a pinch a propane torch will get a hot-spot going that will support establishing real heat output 'more' rapidly but if it is truly cold (-20 & below) one might have to warm the propane bottle first, especially if the fuel has any butane in it like cheap foreign import brands might have. Beware propane tank seal o-rings at those temperatures, unscrewing the burner/valve in that cold can reveal the o-rings failed to seal and cause a 5-foot fountain plume of propane. Way too exciting if one is standing next to the open stove when it happens so forget about that one, take my word for it.

Anyhow - good luck with your new best friend!
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Old 11-14-2012, 05:11 PM   #41
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Quote:
Ya want to keep refueling just for the thrill of watching it burn.
After most of my adult life with wood heat, I'm kinda over it. BUT something does feel missing when it isn't there!
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Old 11-14-2012, 05:12 PM   #42
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In a pinch a propane torch will get a hot-spot going that will support establishing real heat output 'more' rapidly
the "big lighter" is the way to go! $15 well spent. I start with wood, then add the coal as it gets going.
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