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Old 12-16-2014, 05:46 PM   #15
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I pulled my AS to Cordova AL in Dec and came back in Feb, had it power washed at Airstream in London ON so far no sign of corrosion, will be leaving the end of Jan for Louisiana try to run when roads are dry but not always so far so good.
Has any one ever used the Blue Beacon truck washes to clean up on the way ?
To keep my AS weight down I do not carry water in my tanks just carry 5 gal refillable container to use when boon docking .
When I head out this time I'm going to get TV & AS weighed at Cat scale just to have a record of overall weight.
Keep the shiny side up.
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Old 12-17-2014, 09:32 AM   #16
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WOW !!!

THANK YOU SO MUTCH FOR ALL YOUR COMMENTS

Im so nervus now !!

ok I will wash it and wax it when I will be in florida FIRST GOOD IDEAL

ideal from a friend ....

My friend from a car dealer told me they have a product electrostatic rustproofing oto protec !! it s a module to slowing down considerably the corrosion process http://www.otoprotec.com/en!! ?????

it powerfull with a low consumption of 6.9 ma and maintenance free !! but expensive is not a object 300$ .... if the fix the problem or help ...

As someone ever heared about that ?


and the soap I need to use will be .... ???


thank you again
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Old 12-24-2014, 10:36 PM   #17
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I heard they don't work.
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Old 12-24-2014, 11:24 PM   #18
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My friend from a car dealer told me they have a product electrostatic rustproofing oto protec !! it s a module to slowing down considerably the corrosion process http://www.otoprotec.com/en!! ?????

it powerfull with a low consumption of 6.9 ma and maintenance free !! but expensive is not a object 300$ .... if the fix the problem or help ...
It's an old principle going back more than thirty years, called "impressed current cathodic protection" It's used on some submersible steel structures in place of sacrificial zinc, aluminum, or magnesium anodes.

But without an electrolyte to submerge it in, an impressed current system is worthless for preventing corrosion. Now if you want to store your Airstream underwater…
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Old 12-25-2014, 02:02 AM   #19
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There are some good protects tx you can "coat " the underside and even sides of your AS with. Think the old stuff for weapons "cosmolene". One is made by Boeing. Available thru AS. BOESHIELD I think. I had some rust and corrosion it halted. Of course, road spray and salts can get Pls SS you might never expect.... But, there is that option for some peace of mind.

Hey, Protagonist, what happens when folks "land" and set Down the stabilizers, plug in to grounded receptacle??? Will that induce any current? Just wondering... Also, I have experienced a static discharge once as I walked up to the AS and touched it... I figured it was someone nearby in a disco suit...???
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Old 12-25-2014, 05:55 AM   #20
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Hey, Protagonist, what happens when folks "land" and set Down the stabilizers, plug in to grounded receptacle??? Will that induce any current? Just wondering...
No. When you're plugged in, you're grounding to earth through the ground wire in the shore power cable, not through your stabilizers or tongue jack. There is no impressed current to provide cathodic protection. At least you'd better hope not! When it happens by accident, that's how people get electrocuted!
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Old 12-26-2014, 09:34 AM   #21
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yes this product (cathodic protection) is first for boat and now make it for car !!

I thin I will wash it on the road and make a rust protection on the spring time

BOESHIELD T9 is t a good one ? I seen the youtube product video ....
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Old 12-26-2014, 11:27 AM   #22
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yes this product (cathodic protection) is first for boat and now make it for car !
Don't even consider it for cars. Unless you store them underwater. Seriously. The system does not work without an electrolyte (water) present to complete a circuit!
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Old 12-27-2014, 01:11 PM   #23
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ok Its a realy good point about water this system was good for boat ...


I will install a rustproof in spring time

thank you
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Old 12-27-2014, 01:48 PM   #24
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We have towed ours south since we got it (used) about 6 years ago, it originally was owned by someone in NJ and I expect it may also have been towed in salt in that area although I don't know.

What I can tell you from my experience is that I am afraid that even though you try hard to avoid it, salty water will get into the belly pan area and cause problems.

Washing as soon as you get to your destination will no doubt help, but I suspect will not eliminate the problem. I have always tried to wash all the salt off as soon as we get far enough south,

What happens is that one way or another, salt finds its way into the belly pan and just lays in there to do its dirty work. I think that even when it dries, the salt residue is still there and gets re-activated every time you tow on a wet day during the summer,


The main symptom I have seen is all the belly pan rivet locations rotting away - I believe it is due to the fact that the aluminum belly pan skins are riveted to steel cross members and so with the help of the salt, corrosion really takes its toll. The aluminum skin around the rivet will completely disintegrate.

I have had sections of belly pan drop down due to rivets losing their grip. I have probably replaced 50% of the rivets under the trailer.

What I do is to use a larger rivet along with a square 1"x1" washer of 1/16 or 3/32" aluminum that I cut and drill from a long strip strip of aluminum trim available from Home Depot, Ace Hardware, etc. . Mostly that seems to do the trick.

In a couple of places I have also seen the painted wrap around sections (banana skins) rot though where they contact the curved steel cross members on the frame. I have had to patch a couple of these areas near the front of the trailer with aluminum that I painted to match once riveted in place. They are low down and not that noticeable.

I don't know if there is any better solution to this. For now I carry rivet gun, extra rivets/washers, and I check for any newly missing belly pan rivets every time we get where we are going in the south!

The design is not good for our road conditions to be sure!

Brian.
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Old 12-28-2014, 08:20 AM   #25
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Brian

do you have some pics for your job to see where exacly !!!

thank you
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Old 12-29-2014, 01:27 AM   #26
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Hi Soccoo:
What we have done, as we live north as well, is once we hit an area where we pretty much know there will no longer be salt is stop at a self service car wash and take quite a long time to wash and scrub the UNDERSIDE of the AS and then wash the visible exterior using a Micro Fiber hand wash glove so as to not scratch the visible outside. On the underside I use the scrub brushes provided at the car washes as well as the high pressure hoses. We had a 2010 which when we sold her never showed any corrosion using this method.
I wonder if driving through heavy rain would have a similar or even better effect? The reason I ask is because of this interesting observation:

I just drove across Canada, from Toronto to Vancouver, in my van (solo, without the Airstream luckily or it would have had a nice salt bath too). The first two days I drove on salty, slushy roads and the van remained covered in a white film of salt. As I got to the Rocky Mountains, once again I encountered a bit of snow on the road, and what seems to be sand mixed with salt. Then my van was covered in brown. It looked like I had been driving on dirt roads!

But then as I got closer to Vancouver, dropping in elevation, I encountered heavy rain. My van became virtually spotless! I can imagine that the underside got a good power washing with water spraying up from the road for a couple of hours of highway driving. Although that might not be good for an Airstream with gaps or leaks - you might wash a lot (or all of) the salt off, but you might get water infiltration. And any water that you can see inside, might mean that there's water infiltration where you can't see it.

Just can't win, huh?

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Originally Posted by Wingeezer View Post
We have towed ours south since we got it (used) about 6 years ago, it originally was owned by someone in NJ and I expect it may also have been towed in salt in that area although I don't know.

What I can tell you from my experience is that I am afraid that even though you try hard to avoid it, salty water will get into the belly pan area and cause problems.

Washing as soon as you get to your destination will no doubt help, but I suspect will not eliminate the problem. I have always tried to wash all the salt off as soon as we get far enough south,

What happens is that one way or another, salt finds its way into the belly pan and just lays in there to do its dirty work. I think that even when it dries, the salt residue is still there and gets re-activated every time you tow on a wet day during the summer.
Brian.
I often thought about this, and I think you're right. Once salt has touched an Airstream, you may never be able to get it all off 100% - some of it will remain. A good power washing will certainly help, but ideally I agree that the design of our Airstreams is not winter-friendly in regards to driving on roads with salt. My Airstream is 25 years old and seems to be free of any salt corrosion, and I'd like to keep it that way. So, no winter towing! (I'd be nervous to tow on snowy, slushy or icy roads anyways).

I bought my 1990 Airstream Excella 25 at Can-Am RV in London, Ontario. At the time, I was staying with my parents in Barrie, north of Toronto (in the snow belt, lots of lake-effect snow). The day I took my Airstream up to my parents' place (just under 3 hours driving), it was late January. There had been snow and salt on the roads, but the roads were completely dry that day. Until the last 20 minutes. The roads were damp, but not enough water or snow to mix with the salt on the roads, luckily. The last couple of minutes I noticed water was starting to accumulate, but I was already on residential streets at low speeds, so not much chance of salt water spraying up high. I didn't take the trailer out until spring when all of the snow had melted and there had been rain a few times to wash the roads. To date, I have not noticed any corrosion.

I got lucky, and it seems that the previous owners of my Airstream must not have taken it out on salty roads either. Now I'm nervous about taking it out on salty roads. In Vancouver, salt is not a problem since there's little to no snow here. But if I travel any great distance, I'm almost guaranteed to encounter road salt.
Best to leave for your destination before the snow flies! And come back in the spring when it's pretty much certain there won't be any more snow. Or just keep the trailer in storage instead of dragging it back. Or better yet, move to southern California! I'm working on that. For now, Vancouver is the best I can do. I hate snow, salt, freezing temperatures, etc. I've had enough of it to last me a lifetime. If I have to experience it again, it will be too soon.

PS: for those who must tow on salty roads, I wonder if automotive rust proofing, like an oil based product, would be a good thing? Since I don't think there's a way of putting an Airstream on a lift, the person spraying the underside would need to crawl under, or see if anyone has a pit, where they can walk in a little alley underneath, kind of like at some of those oil change places. Still, that means everything will he covered in oil, and it tends to creep into all kinds of places, so whenever anyone needs to work on something underneath, it will be a messy, messy job.
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Old 12-29-2014, 05:51 AM   #27
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Brian

do you have some pics for your job to see where exacly !!!

thank you
Hi Socool,

No, sorry, I don't have any pics, and our trailer is now in storage about 25km from our house until we head south in Feb!

But there wouldn't be much to see anyway - pretty much anywhere under the trailer where the belly pans are riveted to each other, or around wheel wells etc. are locations where I have experienced the problem.

I don't want to exaggerate things, I have not had belly pans sheets falling off, other than one small section near the front of the trailer that just about did!

Luckily it decided to drop down and I noticed it in our storage spot and that was what first alerted me to the problem. When I started looking around under the trailer, I was amazed to see how many rivets were missing all over the place!

All missing rivets have been replaced along with adding the square one inch home made washers that I previously mentioned, but I don't doubt that when I look underneath this winter once we get to Florida I'll have a few more to replace!

I almost wish that AS did not use the enclosed underside arrangement. Our last trailer was an "Award" and the entire underbody was open (and the frame was galvanized). No problem at all with corrosion and we had that trailer for more than 10 years, towing it south each winter.

I think pretty much all you can do is to wash off the underside as best you can and replace any rivets you find missing.

Maybe spraying the rivets with WD-40 or similar might help, but my feeling is that mostly the corrosion happens because of salty road spray that finds its way inside the belly pan and lays there between the steel cross bearers and the aluminum skin and the dissimilar metals really accelerate the corrosion wherever rivets pull them together.

It is more an annoyance than anything else!

Brian.
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Old 12-29-2014, 03:39 PM   #28
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I will double check under my AS and rivets and spray T9 or WD40

thank you
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