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Old 04-09-2016, 10:32 PM   #1
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Kilz priming osb subfloor

We have a 88 Excella that we are currently renovating. We are wondering if we should Kilz primer the subfloor before installing new flooring. There is no rot whatsoever in the sub floor but we did have some previous "tenants" that we have cleaned up from. There was carpet installed when we purchased it. Now we are looking to install vinyl planks. Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.
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Old 04-09-2016, 10:45 PM   #2
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I like using a stain blocker while you can access the sub-floor or underlayment; we did use Kilz before installing Allure. I just makes sense to stabilize the wood and taking care of any stuff that might promote mold and mildew.

You could take a moment and look at the flooring installation instructions to see if there are issue with using Kilz.
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Old 04-09-2016, 11:44 PM   #3
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Wow - you have OSB (oriented strand board) floors that are in good shape? OSB turns to wet cardboard whenever there is water intrusion, which in an Airstream in the Pacific north west is almost inevitable. If yours is truly in good shape and shows no water damage, I don't know that I'd use Kilz - instead I'd seriously consider some kind of penetrating waterproofing agent - possibly the resin they use in fiberglass fabrication. Around the edges, it would need to be thinned to penetrate under the channel. Be extremely thorough around the toilet and any place where plumbing or wiring
And if you have the belly pan off, do the bottom side too, and make sure whatever insulation you have beneath the pan, will drain moisture, and that there's some way for it to escape the belly pan. I've used a dremel and the tiniest drill bit I could find to put some very small holes in the belly pan. Might get ants, but I can always spray for them.

Do some searching for "Floor Rot" to see what others have done.

Vinyl planks - some are great, others NOT. The ones that click together seem to work well but the flexible ones shrink and expand way too much and can tend to buckle. I WATCH other people do this kind of work - and I've also noted that it's a good idea to make allowances for expansion and shrinkage on any flooring that's not glued down. Most people drill relief holes in the flooring before putting in nails or screws that fix cabinets to the wall, etc. (I chose Marmoleum for my Avion; Really liked the commercial rubberized flooring - which in a non-commercial setting should last 50 years - but the cost - O my goodness gracious me! Marmoleum sheet isn't cheap, and it'll surely outlast me so I "settled".

Re-doing a floor is an expensive pain you don't want to have to repeat more than once in 20 years. So take your time and choose everything carefully.

Here's a good link - you might even want to go back to the beginning:

http://www.airforums.com/forums/f461...s-81496-3.html
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Old 04-10-2016, 12:04 AM   #4
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http://www.airforums.com/forums/f461...xy-137415.html

Here's an interesting and short thread on options for sealing the subfloor
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Old 04-10-2016, 12:44 PM   #5
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We used marine grade penetrating epoxy to seal our floor, making sure to coat all edges as well as top and bottom surfaces. Rough up epoxied surface with sandpaper before putting down planks if using the adhesive type. I don't think Kilz is going to do much for you in the long run.
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Old 04-10-2016, 01:39 PM   #6
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We are doing the same thing that you are in a 1989 Excella with the OSB flooring. We were impressed with the condition of the OSB sub-flooring when we pulled up the carpet (6/88 date codes). The only area we had rot was under the refrigerator which had been replaced in 2007. The only thing the PO (or whoever put it in) forgot to do was to run the condensation tube out the bottom of the TT. The tube crumbled apart anyway when I attempted to move it. So be sure to check that area as well and replace your refrigerator's OEM condensation tube with a new vinyl one. After fixing the rotted area, we used Rot Doctor Epoxy Resin Sealer, etc., around the exposed perimeter and other suspect areas (door entrance area, under kitchen sink, etc) We then put down underlayment cushioning foam covering it with 12" x 48" click type flooring in the living room, hallway and rear bedroom (Styleselections Swiftlock @ Lowes). The galley had the OEM Oak flooring that looked solid so we kept it. The bathroom has Stainmaster vinyl click type flooring made especially for wet area use (Lowes as well). The only area we used Kiltz was in the bathroom for added protection in an area we knew would get wet(but was in mint condition OSB-wise). Wasn't sure what effect the Kiltz would have on the OSB treated with Rot Doctor or vice-versa and didn't want to chance it. We've used Kiltz a lot on other projects(but not the Rot Doctor) so we can't see any harm in using it alone. Insofar as flooring, we are doing a shell-on resto and while there are many opinions on the life of particular flooring. We chose a "floating" type that will hopefully flex with the trailer and it was a bit more than $250 to do the whole trailer (32') so not that pricey to replace if needed. We're at the trim work stage and plan to use double-sided tape to attach the wood trim to the interior (non-wood) walls and not to the floating floor so we'll see how it goes. Hope our experience helps as well as the other great tips from forum users hopefully will. Good luck and feel free to inquire if you need any other info from us.
James and Rebecca
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Old 04-10-2016, 09:20 PM   #7
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My guess is that Airstream believes with proper maintenance water intrusion is non existent.

Some folks test for leaks annually other every 5 years or so.

Leaving a leak unchecked will damage any wood floor no matter how it is treated.

The only way to get around this is to not use wood in the first place.
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Old 04-11-2016, 08:48 AM   #8
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I agree completely wit Foiled Again. OSB isn't the best for a wet environment, and when it goes, it's a mess. The idea of a penetrating epoxy is a good one, I like products from epoxyproducts.com, they work well and are comparatively inexpensive. You should concentrate on sealing the edges of the OSB, as that's where the damage will start. Think "sponge"! After sealing them with the penetrating sealer, I'd caulk them up with Big Stretch caulking. Remember that the floor will be bending with the trailer as it goes down the road, and when you level it, so the edges should be flexible.

As to the vinyl, I've heard about installs that stayed looking good, but I have yet to see one. IMHO, it always looks cheap, especially when it buckles from the extremes of temperature that happen in an RV. If I wasn't doing a glue-down bamboo floor in mine, I'd be looking into old-school Linoleum. Non-trivial to install, but if you look at Winnick's book "Airstreams Custom Interiors", you can see how fantastic it comes out.
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