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Old 10-14-2012, 05:40 AM   #15
Luc
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Cape Canaveral , Florida
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Question about "floating floor".

Hello everyone. I have a question about the floating floors everyone is talking about.
My Airstream is a 99 and has the original carpet. New flooring is in my future. It seems that the trailer was built, carpet laid and then the interior installed. Carpet is under everything.
If I want to do it right I am going to have to remove all the interior, install new flooring and putting it all back together.
How much floating will the new floor actually do when it is bound by all the furniture and cabinets?
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Old 10-14-2012, 09:46 AM   #16
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After a summer living with carpet, I have decided on glue down cork, primarily from having installed it successfully in building projects. My thinking is I won't be gluing it directly to the sub floor, rather I'll staple 1/4 inch plywood underlayment first. The ply will also be the good stuff ($20/sheet!) because it has no voids in the core. I'll fill the seams and any other surface defects with a latex floor leveling compound because any imperfection will "telegraph" through the cork. Has anyone done it this way? I would go the floating route except for bad experiences getting it to lock together in tight spaces where a "persuader" can't be used.

Egad!
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Old 10-14-2012, 10:06 AM   #17
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We went with Pergo floating from Home Depot. It locked in pretty easy, but it did take allot of extra material to make those cuts, not including the ones you cut too short.

The original floor was water stained but very solid. WE replaced carpet twice, but after a water incident and a relocation to a warmer climate found that the floating floor worked for us. It does allow for retraction and expansion, so that it very good based on climates and humidity.

We looked at going with the more solid floor as the time invested when placing a floor down is time consuming and you hope to only do it once. What was also a consideration was the weight. The difference between the carpet and the new Pergo floor was about a 45# increase which I thought would be allot more.

On the "plastic" veneer replacements. This can become very expensive to replicate to replace. Again, the weight can add up real quick. We were considering going with some lighter in weight material, like teak in some area's. The cost is amazingly expensive. Even a 24" x 40" table ran about $375 w/out a high gloss finish. check around as some RV furniture companys still make these items for a cost, but the shipping may be worth the expense.

Good luck, some great idea within this thread and some great pics that help visualize how and what to do.
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Old 10-14-2012, 10:18 AM   #18
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That is a beautiful cork floor. I believe that cork is probably the best floor for a trailer. Wetness just does not do well with anything else that is lightweight too. TouringDan, that floor is nice. I would not choose Pergo. Just living in FL and seeing issues in homes with water and sand are enough to steer away from that one. I know lots of people on here use it but in their fine print they also suggest a non-wet area with regard to warranty.

Good question Luc, mine too has carpet under everything in the bedroom where they installed carpet at least. How does one deal with that? I installed carpet only in the walking area as an animal had used the potty between the twin beds and it was stained when I bought it but I came close to going with cork.

Also, question for you corkers, is it possible to cork over the laminate? Would you?
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Old 10-15-2012, 10:23 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoadHungry View Post
That looks great. Thinking of doing mine in a similar fashion. I just have a S/O to deal with. Also has anyone ever put heating strips down? A heated floor on cold mornings should would be nice !
RH

I believe if you use a cork floor that you do not need heat strips. We just returned from a camping trip down the Blue Ridge Parkway and it got into the low 30's at night. I did not even bother putting my slippers on when I had to get up in the middle of the night. So I believe adding heat under cork is not needed, and if it is not necessary than it is necessary not to install it. You don't need the complexity, the weight or anything else that comes with it. Remember that "new solutions have new problems" Also, you are going to heat it with electricity. We were boondocking, so no 120v ac! Just my opinion.

Dan
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Old 10-15-2012, 10:29 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by VeggieBullet View Post
Hi Dan
That is a very good lookin floor! wondering what wre you [lanning on doing for "the gap"
Again, it looks great!
VB

Thanks! Glad that you like it.

If you look at posts 3-7 of the following link about my 66 Tradewind improvements you will find the details of how I installed the floor and covered the 1/8" gap. Basically, I used a 5/16 x 3/4 base shoe that I cut down from 1/2 x 3/4 base shoe.

http://www.airforums.com/forums/f116...nts-94152.html

Dan
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Old 10-15-2012, 10:41 AM   #21
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I Agree With wahoonc...

Quote:
Originally Posted by wahoonc View Post
I am using wood grain floating vinyl, and Berber carpet. More vinyl than carpet.

As far as the stains, take an ice pick and poke around along the edges of the wall and see if there are any soft spots hidden underneath it. Sometimes you get water stains from condensation, old leaks that were fixed or someone dropped a beer or two.

As far as interior decor, do what you want. On my 1975 I am going back with pretty much an original interior with some minor upgrades. On my 1981 it is going to be full blown custom.
Aaron
Vinyl floor covering (free-floating or adhered) really is a nice choice. In the restoral where I've used it, I been very pleased. I had a chance to visit our first Airstream at Balloon Fiesta last week, and the vinyl floor still looks great after more than 12 years of use.
Our second Airstream, a 2000 Safari, came with carpet, which was very difficult to keep clean.
The indoor-outdoor carpet I installed in our third Airstream (the '76 Sovereign) began to look like Cr#@ within months. I couldn't do vinyl because the sub-floor was so rough, and I didn't want to install underlayment, which would have been the correct choice.
Our current AIrstream, a 2007, came from the factory with wood-grain vinyl that we really, really like. Unfortunately, there is still carpet in the very front around the sofa, and in the rear around the queen bed.
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Old 10-15-2012, 10:44 AM   #22
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New Floor Fun

I really wanted the look of wood but not the expansive and absorptive qualities. I found an interlocking vinyl floor at home depot. It's called traffic master allure ultra. It's indoor outdoor and waterproof. Its easy to lay. I hope to have the back sub-floor installed in the next two weeks so I can lay it. It snaps together. It lacks the expansion of real woods, it's weight is comparable to the other flooring types already mentioned. It's under $3 a square foot. Hope others will chime in if they've tried this floor. Make sure to look specifically for the ultra, snap together style. I would not use the adhesive edged style. Happy flooring!
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Old 10-15-2012, 11:38 AM   #23
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Can't Wait for Pictures, Momoffive...

That's the product I'm thinking of using in our 2007 when we rip out the factory installed carpet around the front sofa.
Sadly, we will be forced to remove the wood-grained vinyl too because of the way carpet and vinyl were installed.
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Old 10-16-2012, 08:47 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luc View Post
Hello everyone. I have a question about the floating floors everyone is talking about.
My Airstream is a 99 and has the original carpet. New flooring is in my future. It seems that the trailer was built, carpet laid and then the interior installed. Carpet is under everything.
If I want to do it right I am going to have to remove all the interior, install new flooring and putting it all back together.
How much floating will the new floor actually do when it is bound by all the furniture and cabinets?
Luc

If you want to install a floating floor, I would not remove the cabinet. My recommendation would be to remove the carpeting up to the cabinet. I left a 1/8" gap between the cork flooring and the cabinets to allow the flooring to expand and contract.

good luck, Dan
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Old 10-16-2012, 09:02 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by egad View Post
After a summer living with carpet, I have decided on glue down cork, primarily from having installed it successfully in building projects. My thinking is I won't be gluing it directly to the sub floor, rather I'll staple 1/4 inch plywood underlayment first. The ply will also be the good stuff ($20/sheet!) because it has no voids in the core. I'll fill the seams and any other surface defects with a latex floor leveling compound because any imperfection will "telegraph" through the cork. Has anyone done it this way? I would go the floating route except for bad experiences getting it to lock together in tight spaces where a "persuader" can't be used.

Egad!
Installing a floating floor in a trailer is not easy, but I would do it again rather than gluing the floor down. It has the following advantages IMHO:

1. Can seal plywood to protect it from moisture in case any moisture gets under the floating floor.

2. Can replace any flooring that gets damaged.

3. Easy to remove in the event you want to replace it completely. After removing the base shoe trim, the flooring could be removed in just a few minutes.

Installing underlayment will add unnecessary weight and raise the floor another 1/4". I would not do this.

I found a tool at Lowes that allowed me to lock the edge pieces in place. It would not have been possible to lock these pieces in place without this tool. Believe me I tried. I will post a photo if you like.

Dan
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Old 10-16-2012, 09:07 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by rodsterinfl View Post
Also, question for you corkers, is it possible to cork over the laminate? Would you?
I would not install the cork over laminate, although I believe that it is possible. Why leave the laminate that adds unnecessary weight and raises the level of the cork by the thickness of the laminate. I suspect this would be a problem at the door when it came time to install trim.

Dan
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Old 10-16-2012, 10:13 AM   #27
Luc
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Dan,
To do it right I am convinced all the interior has to be removed.
There are too many gaps and voids in between each piece.
Are you saying that a floating floor cannot be installed under the cabinets?
Thanks
Luc
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Old 10-16-2012, 03:10 PM   #28
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What did you remove to put the floor in? Cabinets, sofa? Looks great.
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