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Old 11-11-2012, 07:45 PM   #29
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Shock Size

The original shocks were Monroe (1960-1967 Chevy Pickup) Napa PN94005
Is this correct for a 35 deg down angle??
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Old 11-11-2012, 08:01 PM   #30
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The original shocks were Monroe (1960-1967 Chevy Pickup) Napa PN94005
Is this correct for a 35 deg down angle??
Are they going to be mounted more or less vertically? If so, they should work just fine. Have your brackets welded on the arms so the shocks are more or less in mid-travel when at rest.
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Old 11-12-2012, 07:21 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by jlovelady View Post
The original shocks were Monroe (1960-1967 Chevy Pickup) Napa PN94005
Is this correct for a 35 deg down angle??
The original shocks were made by Delco.

The starting angle has nothing to do with the shocks.

Andy
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Old 11-12-2012, 07:30 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by jlovelady View Post
The original shocks were Monroe (1960-1967 Chevy Pickup) Napa PN94005
Is this correct for a 35 deg down angle??
You also sent me a PM.

You have your PM set up that blocks all messages.

Therefore, I could not answer you via a PM.

Andy
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Old 11-14-2012, 11:55 PM   #33
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Just as a comment about whether shocks make a difference. Four years ago we replaced the shocks on our 23' safari. Prior to replacing them we would regularly find the vents from the air conditioner on the floor. Often tambour doors would open during the trip and add to the stuff scattered about. Once the shocks were replaced all that went away, even when we had to navigate some pretty ugly roads.

From an engineering perspective, springs usually need some form of damping, especially if there is any possible chance of resonance. Without shocks, a lot of assumptions go out the window as does the ability to deal with a wide range of loads. You may find that it works fine as long as there is adequate amounts of baggage on board and the holding tanks have at least some minimum amount of water in them. Of course fuel economy may suffer if you have to tote half a tank of water in the camper to keep it stabile.

Assuming the goal is to keep an old Airstream on the road as long as possible, the shocks are a relatively inexpensive part of the solution.

Tom
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Old 11-15-2012, 10:37 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by Tom Bray View Post
Just as a comment about whether shocks make a difference. Four years ago we replaced the shocks on our 23' safari. Prior to replacing them we would regularly find the vents from the air conditioner on the floor. Often tambour doors would open during the trip and add to the stuff scattered about. Once the shocks were replaced all that went away, even when we had to navigate some pretty ugly roads.

From an engineering perspective, springs usually need some form of damping, especially if there is any possible chance of resonance. Without shocks, a lot of assumptions go out the window as does the ability to deal with a wide range of loads. You may find that it works fine as long as there is adequate amounts of baggage on board and the holding tanks have at least some minimum amount of water in them. Of course fuel economy may suffer if you have to tote half a tank of water in the camper to keep it stabile.

Assuming the goal is to keep an old Airstream on the road as long as possible, the shocks are a relatively inexpensive part of the solution.

Tom
Thank you for your observations. I have followed this subject with interest for some time. I have a question, how old are your axles? The reason I ask , I wonder if older axles get less flexable and transmit more shock that the shocks then absorb?
Ever trying to learn.
John
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Old 11-15-2012, 12:45 PM   #35
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Old axles will become ridged. The best way to prevent it is to use the trailer. Even new axles will become ridged if they are left sitting for long periods of time. So if you spend the money on axles, make sure you travel with the trailer.
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Old 11-16-2012, 09:01 AM   #36
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Thank you for your observations. I have followed this subject with interest for some time. I have a question, how old are your axles? The reason I ask , I wonder if older axles get less flexable and transmit more shock that the shocks then absorb?
Ever trying to learn.
John
Torsion axles can "bottom out" when the rubber rods have deteriorated.

As an example, if the torsion arm can move 3 inches when new, that dimension decreases when the rubber rods age out.

That dimension can approach zero.

Two basic things cause the rubber rods to fail.

1. Age. Torsion axles, if used properly, can last upwards of 30 years or so.

2. Lack of use. Rubber must be exercised to stay alive. Parking the trailer or the tag axle motorhome home for long periods, is the culprit.

Parking the trailer for long periods of time, can be successful, within reason, but only if you remove the weight from the axles.

Andy
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