Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 02-02-2006, 05:49 PM   #1
4 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 389
Shock n' (axle) question

One more step in the axle replace process (which has been the worst part of the entire renovation...)

The two drawings below show my plan - I will weld the shock bracket to the pivot arm out near the wheel. But....


1 - there is about 5 inches of travel in the shock - do I set it up so that the shock is at 2.5 inches of travel at rest? How do I figure how much more the trailer will "settle" with the extra 1500 pounds still to go on my renovation?

2 - the bracket will almost touch on both sides (the hub and the frame). Is that ok?

3 - how far out towards the end of the arm do I put the bracket? Further out will equal more travel, in towards the pivot point will reduce the travel. Does anyone have any practical experience here?

4 - am I way off base here?

as always, thanks for all the help!!
Carlos Ferguson
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	front-view-shock.jpg
Views:	106
Size:	34.2 KB
ID:	18147   Click image for larger version

Name:	side-view-shock.jpg
Views:	106
Size:	38.6 KB
ID:	18148  

__________________

__________________
jcferguson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 05:53 PM   #2
Well Preserved

 
1993 21' Sovereign
Colfax , North Carolina
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 20,193
Carlos, unless you have a very early version of the DuraTorque axle, it should be mounted horizontally, not vertically. Mounting horizontally will give you more room to place the shock, and the travel will be more than ample in that position.
__________________

__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy, and taste good with ketchup.
Terry
overlander63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 06:11 PM   #3
4 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 389
Quote:
Originally Posted by overlander63
Carlos, unless you have a very early version of the DuraTorque axle, it should be mounted horizontally, not vertically. Mounting horizontally will give you more room to place the shock, and the travel will be more than ample in that position.
I have a '62 and the shock is where it was originally in my drawing. I tried to figure how to make it horizontal but it didn't work in any plan I could come up with - the swing arm is towards the rear (the wheel trails the axle front to back).

How would I mount it horizontally?

Thanks,
Carlos
__________________
jcferguson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 06:21 PM   #4
Well Preserved

 
1993 21' Sovereign
Colfax , North Carolina
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 20,193
Ahhh

You DO have one of the early ones. Our 63 has the shocks mounted as you have shown in your drawing. I will try to find you a photo or diagram of horizontal-mounted shocks.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy, and taste good with ketchup.
Terry
overlander63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 06:41 PM   #5
Remember Burma Shave!
 
driftwood's Avatar
 
2006 19' Safari
2000 25' Safari
1985 25' Sovereign
Fort Myers , SW.Florida
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 510
Images: 35
Rivet

Terry, Like this ???

Pattersontoo's Argosy.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	wirebrushed%20unpainted.JPG
Views:	115
Size:	22.2 KB
ID:	18153   Click image for larger version

Name:	Finished%20without%20wheel.JPG
Views:	131
Size:	21.4 KB
ID:	18154  

__________________
NORM #3305

"... there is nothing you can't fix yourself ...
... if you're handy ...
... with a check book! ..."
driftwood is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 07:30 PM   #6
Site Team
 
, Minnesota
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 6,940
Images: 59
Have you seen this thread? It has pictures of the original vertical shock tower.

http://www.airforums.com/forum...eck-12143.html?
__________________
markdoane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 08:13 PM   #7
4 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 389
Quote:
Originally Posted by markdoane
Have you seen this thread? It has pictures of the original vertical shock tower.

http://www.airforums.com/forum...eck-12143.html?

Yes, this is how mine was set up - and I guess the best way to re-set it up when I weld on this plate. I just wonder how far out on that arm the base of the shock should attach... and do I weld the bracket so that the shock is in the middle of its extension at rest?
Carlos
__________________
jcferguson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 09:11 PM   #8
Site Team
 
, Minnesota
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 6,940
Images: 59
Carlos,

Don't mount the bracket so it is in the middle. The correct method is to set the bracket so that the shock does not bottom-out either at the top or bottom of the axle travel.

Dexter has unloaded and full load dimensions at their website. You can look up your axle and find out the total travel, then either draw it out on paper or make construction paper templates to determine the best bracket location.

If you need help let me know.
__________________
markdoane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 09:15 PM   #9
Rivet Master
 
Janets Husband's Avatar
 
1977 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre
1964 26' Overlander
1977 25' Tradewind
Eastern , Washington
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 865
Images: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcferguson
Yes, this is how mine was set up - and I guess the best way to re-set it up when I weld on this plate. I just wonder how far out on that arm the base of the shock should attach... and do I weld the bracket so that the shock is in the middle of its extension at rest?
Carlos
The method I used takes some jockeying to get the best position.
I don't believe you will find correct position in any drawing due to variations over the years.
Put the shocks on the trailer then bolt up the axle, it will then become apparent where they should go. Mark the position with a felt tip pen.
Note: Check for full travel (straight in line) without binding or hitting the frame.
Remove the axle and weld on the new mount.
It took me a while to find the best location. I used a floor jack to move the swing arm for checking.
Good Luck.
__________________
Peace
Gary
Janets Husband is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 10:16 PM   #10
uwe
418
 
uwe's Avatar
 
2007 25' Safari FB SE
1958 22' Flying Cloud
1974 29' Ambassador
Yucca Valley , California
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 1963 26' Overlander
Posts: 4,767
Images: 41
Send a message via Skype™ to uwe
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcferguson
One more step in the axle replace process (which has been the worst part of the entire renovation...)

The two drawings below show my plan - I will weld the shock bracket to the pivot arm out near the wheel. But....


1 - there is about 5 inches of travel in the shock - do I set it up so that the shock is at 2.5 inches of travel at rest? How do I figure how much more the trailer will "settle" with the extra 1500 pounds still to go on my renovation?
Carlos,
One of two ways you can go. Put the bracket where the old one was, or in a similar location. The travel of the torsion arm is quite little, it being so short. Or, find a suitable new location if the old style bracket won't fit. I suggest putting it as far back on the torsion arm as possible, close to the spindle's center line to get the most amount of shock travel and precise damping.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcferguson
2 - the bracket will almost touch on both sides (the hub and the frame). Is that ok?
1/4in clearance is good enough. A little less is ok if you observe the travel. Stuff does move and flex while you're towing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcferguson
3 - how far out towards the end of the arm do I put the bracket? Further out will equal more travel, in towards the pivot point will reduce the travel. Does anyone have any practical experience here?
Put it as far back as it is practical. The ideal spot is right above the center of the spindle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcferguson
4 - am I way off base here?

as always, thanks for all the help!!
Carlos Ferguson
You're lucky, the vertical shock actually does a little bit of something while you drive. The newer horizontal shock is all but useless,( in my humble opinion) it only moves an inch at best when the trailer is loaded and the torsion arm is near vertical. Add to this the loose valving of the factory shock, and you have a system who's function is quite questionable, in my mind, at least. I tried my TradeWind without shocks for a while, and could not tell a difference in towing, or in the way that stuff moved around in the trailer. I eventually put new ones back on, for sake of originality. With raised eyebrows....
The shocks on my Overlander ( vertical) are 90% extended with the suspension unloaded.
__________________
Uwe
www.area63productions.com
uwe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2006, 10:38 PM   #11
4 Rivet Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 389
Quote:
Originally Posted by uwe
Carlos,
The shocks on my Overlander ( vertical) are 90% extended with the suspension unloaded.

I think this is what I am looking for... I suppose there is a lot more "up" action than down action then?

Carlos
__________________
jcferguson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2006, 11:28 AM   #12
Moderator dude
 
Action's Avatar

 
1966 26' Overlander
Phoenix , Arizona
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,067
Images: 13
Carlos - My '66 has vertical shocks too. The vertical shocks have another benefit. They are far easier to obtain than horizontal ones.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
__________________
1966 Mercury Park Lane 4 DR Breezeway 410 4V, C-6, 2.80 - Streamless.
1966 Lincoln 4 door Convertible 462 4V 1971 Ford LTD Convertible 429 4V Phoenix ~ Yeah it's hot however it's a dry heat!
Action is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2006, 12:52 PM   #13
uwe
418
 
uwe's Avatar
 
2007 25' Safari FB SE
1958 22' Flying Cloud
1974 29' Ambassador
Yucca Valley , California
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 1963 26' Overlander
Posts: 4,767
Images: 41
Send a message via Skype™ to uwe
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcferguson
I think this is what I am looking for... I suppose there is a lot more "up" action than down action then?

Carlos
Due to the self damping tendency of the rubber torsion axle system, it is unlikely that the unsprung tire/wheel assembly will overshoot it's unloaded natural resting place by a large margin, should the trailer ever go over a huge bump and become semi-airborne.
Therefore, it is my opinion that a 10% safety travel provision is adequate. My wife and the cat think so, too.

A trailer that has a conventional solid axle system would probably have to be configured differently, as the sheer weight of a solid axle with brakes and tires, suspended from heavy leaf springs, will definitely have more momentum when accelerated quickly ( such as when going over bumps) as the torsion system has.
__________________
Uwe
www.area63productions.com
uwe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2006, 01:06 PM   #14
uwe
418
 
uwe's Avatar
 
2007 25' Safari FB SE
1958 22' Flying Cloud
1974 29' Ambassador
Yucca Valley , California
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 1963 26' Overlander
Posts: 4,767
Images: 41
Send a message via Skype™ to uwe
Quote:
Originally Posted by Action
Carlos - My '66 has vertical shocks too. The vertical shocks have another benefit. They are far easier to obtain than horizontal ones.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
A word of caution here. I went shopping for vertical shocks, only to find out that modern shocks are all gas charged, with very few exceptions which would not fit the requirements for my Airstream, physically.
My observations are that the bracketry that Airstream provides, both on the axle and on the frame, is not very strong. It bends fairly easy. A shock with a fair amount of gas-pre-load, like Bilstein, for example, might be too extreme for this bracketry, especially when travelling on bad roads. I believe that the rubber torsion suspension works best if the shock that is supposed to control excess movement is a mere passive dampner, as opposed to having a gas charge that is essentially trying to lift the trailer slightly by the shock brackets at all times. Too much compression damping, for my understanding, would work against the rubber's ability to provide a smooth and soft ride. Some gas shocks do not have a lot of pre-load, which should be ok for this application.
__________________

__________________
Uwe
www.area63productions.com
uwe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tow Vehicle Question-for a 34 ft, 3 axle Excella dmreilly10000 Tow Vehicles 26 08-02-2011 10:05 PM
Tag axle shock rdm Mechanics Corner - Engines, Transmission & More... 8 07-10-2008 08:15 PM
one or two axle? vallan1980 Airstream Trailer Forums 5 09-17-2002 06:47 PM
Axle Offset Question DanLyle Axles 11 08-28-2002 10:35 AM
63 TW shock Moonshot Shocks 5 08-26-2002 10:24 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.