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Old 03-27-2015, 03:49 PM   #1
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Mantua , Ohio
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Shock angle on early 1960s double axle

I have mixed thinking about how to mount the shocks on my new Dexter Shocks bought through Andy (2 weeks and 2 days I had them).
Vertical? Or on some angle?
Pros & cons?
Any thoughts would be GREAT!
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Old 03-27-2015, 04:47 PM   #2
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1993 21' Sovereign
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The originals were vertical, and if you replace them in-kind, you will be able to use standard automotive shocks. You can get them at any auto parts store, and they cost significantly less than the horizontal shocks.
They will work the same whether horizontal or vertical.
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Old 03-27-2015, 05:05 PM   #3
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^^^^^^ Second that! ^^^^^^^

I had a '66 which was the last year for vertical shocks. Competition works better for my wallet.

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Old 03-28-2015, 06:34 AM   #4
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1966 24' Tradewind
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I kept my 66 with the vertical shock mounting. I did use Monroe automotive shocks purchased at my local NAPA. I think both the vertical and Airstream special horizontal shocks were in the $30 each range. I don't recall the shocks for my 86 being outrageous in cost from Inland.

I would be nervous designing an new shock mounting location on an old Airstream. My 66 has a separate piece of steel welded to the frame that extends into the wheel house and has a stud welded to it for the shock bolt. You can kinda see it in the photo below. Notice the stiffening rib formed into the shock mount. There is a ton of vibrational forces in a shock mount. The horizontal mounting design allowed the upper shock mount right on the frame rail.

I'm probably wrong, but I think the vertical shocks went away in 1969.

David
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