Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-28-2007, 09:46 AM   #43
INSANITY CENTRAL
 
doorgunner's Avatar
 
1986 32' Excella
2014 Interstate Ext. Coach
Citrus Heights , California
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,105
Images: 35
Good eye Royce- I've owned this one for 15 or so years, it's my favorite hand tool. Really sharpens up well with waterstones and holds a fine edge for a long time.I looked at the wood shop just last week, planes are getting expensive, at least nice ones!
__________________

__________________


www.popasmoke.com




Proud Appellation American





Vine View Heights is now closed.

YETI ( 65 Quart )

IGLOO (Ice Cube, 50 Quart )
doorgunner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2007, 02:25 PM   #44
Rivet Master
 
JimGolden's Avatar
 
Vintage Kin Owner
1977 31' Excella 500
Berkeley Springs , West Virginia
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,619
Images: 7
I'll check out that book DG. I had some composites training in college and have the books from that. I've worked on some boats and fixed the fairing on my Goldwing after I dumped it.

I'd like to attend several of those Sportair workshops. I did just take a semester long welding class at the local community college and got myself a new Lincoln TIG machine. That's for the plane. It'll do stick also, which is for about everything else. IF I need a new frame, I'll stick most of it.

Oshkosh is very high on my list. My best bud out in Seattle (he still works for Boeing) wants to rendevous with me up there summer 2008. Since Camp Schuler appears to be basically a field, I'll need tanks and a generator. Don't know if I can be ready in time....

Sun and Fun I flew over once in a 172 doing my long cross country back in '89, but never got to go to it. The only "big" EAA show I've ever gotten to go to was the Arlington one when I worked at Boeing. It was great though. I'd really like to get up to Osh.

I know the new AS classics are using Corian counters and hickory cabinets. Hickory is very heavy, and corian is too.

I guess rather than get super nuts with it, I'd just like to beef mine up a little bit and not add a ton of weight to it.

I woodwork too....funny how the guys on here that are into fixing up these old trailers and are into airplanes are also into woodwork. If you guys are like me, you're always busy, can never sit still, and always have a never ending list of projects to work on!

Like they said in "Conan the Barbarian", time enough for sleep in the grave.
__________________

__________________
- Jim
JimGolden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2007, 02:35 PM   #45
3 Rivet Member
 
AgZep's Avatar
 
2005 28' International CCD
Las Cruces , New Mexico
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 176
Yeah, I'm an EAA guy too. I guess we're all alike or something.
__________________
AgZep is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2007, 04:42 PM   #46
Rivet Master
 
vswingfield's Avatar
 
1983 34' Excella
1967 24' Tradewind
Little Rock , Arkansas
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 3,773
Images: 32
Hi Jim,

Simply replacing the MDF tabletops with laminate covered AC plywood is a considerable, inexpensive, weight savings. I replace a couple in my Excella, and the new pieces were noticeably lighter to handle. Sorry, didn't weigh the difference.

Vaughan
__________________
vswingfield is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2007, 08:08 PM   #47
Silver Mist
 
LI Pets's Avatar
 
1977 31' Sovereign
Riverhead , New York
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 3,008
Images: 28
I just replaced all my screens with fiberglass type, when I gathered up all the old alum screening it had some weight to it!
__________________
Bob
'77 Sovereign Intl 31' CB
WBCCI R2 Rep VAC 11411 Metro NY VP

LI Pets is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2007, 08:32 PM   #48
2 Rivet Member
 
2007 16' International CCD
Los Angeles , California
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 98
Alucobond

Hi,

I have some furniture at home (swiss design) made out of Alucobond.
Originally this material was used for covering buildings and similar, but more and more designers start to use it for furniture, because it's extremely strong, lightweight, very thin (4 mm) and beautiful!

Basically it's made of 2 layers of Aluminium with a core of fire proof composite.

You can order it in many sizes, bend it, cut it any shape you want and it's structurally strong, so no need for a frame.
You can use normal utensils (like for aluminum) for cutting, drilling and folding (V shaped milling for a perfect angle)

It comes in several strengths and colors.

Besides cutting on weight, you also gain space in your Airstream.

I am going to redo my '07 Bambi in this material as soon as I have a good working space.

Alucobond - The World's Favorite Aluminum Composite Material

or google Alucobond furniture.

Sten
__________________
sos10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2007, 09:58 PM   #49
Rivet Master
 
1973 31' Sovereign
Portland , Oregon
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 1,245
Images: 22
Sten,

This looks like pretty interesting stuff indeed! It has been around for along time too and I have never heard of it. I don't suppose it would be strong enough to be used for a sub-floor? Have you been able to get any idea on what pricing would be like. Have you been able to zero in on a stocking distributor?

I would be very interested in seeing how this works out for you. Mostly depending on price I would be interested in considering it for my remodel as well. So please keep us posted on any details you find out about.

Malcolm
__________________
Only he who attempts the ridiculous can achieve the impossble.
malconium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2007, 09:19 AM   #50
Well Preserved

 
1993 21' Sovereign
Colfax , North Carolina
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 20,193
This would probably be cost-prohibitive, but you could replace all the wooden counters and framing with Balsa wood. That is what they make many RC airplanes out of. Pick up a piece of Balsa, and a comparable sized piecce of Pine, or Oak, and you will notice a huge weight difference.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy, and taste good with ketchup.
Terry
overlander63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2007, 09:33 AM   #51
INSANITY CENTRAL
 
doorgunner's Avatar
 
1986 32' Excella
2014 Interstate Ext. Coach
Citrus Heights , California
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,105
Images: 35
Back to sandwich construction!

O-63 Great idea! Remember that balsa is soft! So you can still purchase end grain balsa sheets.Different thickness's are available. And not cost prohibitive! Check some of the boat places. Lots of fast boats used this construction method- I used to race J-24's. Strong hulls. The balsa makes a lightweight core, then just glass or use some other material on both sides. You can even bend the end grain some and then glass over it- like if you wanted to make curved bases for new dinete area. Lotsa possibilities, show me the lay up table! As you all know I'm a big fan of composites and vacuum bagging. I'ld really like to make a composite trailer just need a financial backer. DG
__________________


www.popasmoke.com




Proud Appellation American





Vine View Heights is now closed.

YETI ( 65 Quart )

IGLOO (Ice Cube, 50 Quart )
doorgunner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2007, 11:25 AM   #52
Moderator
 
HiHoAgRV's Avatar

 
1991 34' Excella
1963 26' Overlander
1961 26' Overlander
Central , Mississippi
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 5,326
Images: 29
Blog Entries: 49
Composite

How about attending the EAA Composites workshop and get up to speed on Foam cored construction. Then you could build a fully composite frame with integral structural tanks and all sorts of other wiz bang stuff. The attached screen snapshot is a 31 foot composite frame using 45 cubic feet of volume. Anyone know what the mass is of a foam cored structural member? If you'll PM me i'll update the model and post the total weight.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	small frame.jpg
Views:	59
Size:	14.9 KB
ID:	39927  
__________________
Hi Ho Silver RV! Vernon, Sarah, Mac the Border Collie -
A honkin' long 34' named AlumaTherapy http://www.airforums.com/forums/f205...num-54749.html
and a 26' '63 Overlander, Dolly http://www.airforums.com/forums/f109...ome-71609.html
HiHoAgRV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2007, 11:35 AM   #53
Rivet Master
Airstream Dealer
 
Inland RV Center, In's Avatar
 
Corona , California
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 16,499
Images: 1
Weight reduction.

The type construction of an Airstream trailer is semi-monocoque, which means that the "shell" is load bearing.

It does not mean that an Airstream flys like an aircraft.

With any aircraft, weight is "extrememly" important.

NOT SO WITH AN AIRSTREAM TRAILER.

Start at the west coast and go to the east coast, with the typical 60 gallons of water on board and nothing else. That payload is 480 pounds.

Duplicate the trip with "NO" water on board. You will find the difference in fuel mileage to be absolutely insignificant.

Unless considerable mountain towing is on the agenda, towing an empty or fully loaded Airstream trailer over a long distance will make almost zero difference in fuel mileage.

That information is based on a study of over 100,000 miles of testing.

Andy
__________________
Inland RV Center, In is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2007, 12:52 PM   #54
Rivet Master
 
2002 19' Bambi
Lafayette , California
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 708
Andy, thanks for that information. Now I do not feel so guilty about running so often with a full or nearly full freshwater tank.

I just read through this whole thread again and I cannot help but having the feeling that many suffer from my own problem. That is, thinking how much fun it would be to build lighter and better with weight reduction only a nice excuse for doing the work. I am presently restoring a riveted aluminum rowboat built by my father in about 1950. It is 9 1/2' long, all rounded in shape, and a great accessory for our Airstream. The bare hull weighs 75 pounds, so I have saved a few ounces by making composited (for example, thin marine plywood bonded to rigid urethane foam) pieces for it. Is the weight saving practical? Well, it will increase bouyancy if the boat capsizes, but the existing flotation tanks did quite well when my brother and I were playing with the boat as kids. No, I admit it, I just wanted to see if I could fabricate these parts the way I wished!
__________________
Tim A. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2007, 01:45 PM   #55
Rivet Master
Airstream Dealer
 
Inland RV Center, In's Avatar
 
Corona , California
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 16,499
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim A.
Andy, thanks for that information. Now I do not feel so guilty about running so often with a full or nearly full freshwater tank.

I just read through this whole thread again and I cannot help but having the feeling that many suffer from my own problem. That is, thinking how much fun it would be to build lighter and better with weight reduction only a nice excuse for doing the work. I am presently restoring a riveted aluminum rowboat built by my father in about 1950. It is 9 1/2' long, all rounded in shape, and a great accessory for our Airstream. The bare hull weighs 75 pounds, so I have saved a few ounces by making composited (for example, thin marine plywood bonded to rigid urethane foam) pieces for it. Is the weight saving practical? Well, it will increase bouyancy if the boat capsizes, but the existing flotation tanks did quite well when my brother and I were playing with the boat as kids. No, I admit it, I just wanted to see if I could fabricate these parts the way I wished!
There are many things that could be done. The question is the cost. Will the retail customer pay for the composite costs? I don't think so.

Traveling with a "full" tank of water, is a must for two reasons.

First, it lowers the center of gravity.

Secondly, blow a heater hose in the middle of no place. All you need is some duct tape to fix the split hose, "plus water." Ah, where oh where would you get that water?

Should this happen, do not tighten the radiator cap and shut the AC off.

It's amazing how many miles you can travel until you can get a hose, just because you have duct tape, "and" lots of water.

You can fret at home.

When you tow your Airstream, do like the boy scouts do.

"Be prepared."

Andy
__________________
Inland RV Center, In is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2007, 02:00 PM   #56
Well Preserved

 
1993 21' Sovereign
Colfax , North Carolina
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 20,193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inland RV Center, In
Start at the west coast and go to the east coast, with the typical 60 gallons of water on board and nothing else. That payload is 480 pounds.

Duplicate the trip with "NO" water on board. You will find the difference in fuel mileage to be absolutely insignificant.
Andy
I can back Andy up on this. Mileage towing our Argosy 20 was 10. Mileage towing our 31' Sovereign was...10. If anything, mileage was slightly better towing the Sovereign.
I like lightweight stuff like counters, beause that means I can bring more toys without overloading.
__________________

__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy, and taste good with ketchup.
Terry
overlander63 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Sovereign weight and Preferred tow vehicle JLD 1974 - 1979 Sovereign 24 06-26-2017 11:17 PM
Weight 1987 34' Excella 83Excella 1987 - 1989 Excella 6 03-26-2003 07:43 PM
weight specs for 68 Overlander 26D PeterH-Airstreamer 1969 Overlander 5 02-08-2003 04:49 PM
Trailer weight Dbraw 1969 - 1973 Safari 3 06-26-2002 01:01 PM
Help find the weight of a 1981 31foot Excella Sharon Lee Our Community 8 06-18-2002 09:55 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.