Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-29-2015, 10:18 PM   #197
3 Rivet Member
 
1972 25' Tradewind
Denver , Colorado
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 101
Well... it's ballz-cold (currently 12F), so it's been tough to motivate. Also the holidays and whatnot.

I will say: I have been surprised at silicon's ability to stick to (and stay stuck to) the most freezing of metal. I haven't been pushing it too much, but the few pieces of polyiso spacers I've put up in the super cold have stayed stuck.

I'm also dealing with sort of strange shapes right now trying to get an end cap done (you've got to cut shapes for multiple angles and curves, thus everything is a wedge shape). The three or four straight runs I did to get into the swing of things were extremely simple, and I'm very happy with the seal in those runs. I cut just a tad large so I had to shove it in a bit... which really makes a nice "seal" (which then gets reinforced with foil tape) and definitely stays put.

Unfortunately, I don't have enough done to report back one way or the other (does the inside stay warm? too many gaping holes), but my theory still SEEMS good with things under way.

I haven't taken a weight measurement on the submerged pieces of polyiso yet, but there doesn't seem to be any visible deterioration at this point.
__________________

__________________
25' 1972 Airstream Trade Wind Land Yacht
2006 Jeep Liberty CRD (diesel)
http://BeahmStream.com
kidjedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2016, 12:36 PM   #198
3 Rivet Member
 
1972 25' Tradewind
Denver , Colorado
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 101
So I've got most of my PIC installed (and can now easily heat the Airstream with my little 750 watt electric space heater in less than half an hour). I still can't decide if I'm going to use 65 mil EPDM rubber or closed-cell poly sill plate insulation (the thin blue roll from Lowe's) to insulate the ribs. I was going to tape the rib insulation on with the foil tape used to seal the PIC voids before installing the PIC panels, but then I realized that would be stupid since the foil tape would conduct cold from the sides of the ribs (where it would be adhered) to the interior skins (over the rubber or foam). I could use the tape now that the panels are installed and stick the tape to the front surface of the panels, but instead, I'll be using a bit of silicone marine sealant to stick the rubber or foam to the ribs (actually, the foil tape that's now over the ribs) right before laying the skins over them. The silicone is WAAAAY cheaper than the foil tape.

I'm hoping the thin strips of foam or rubber won't cause any issues (movement) once the skin is riveted to the ribs (through the foam or rubber). There will be a bit of thermal transmission through the aluminum rivets, but it should be minimal compared to full contact between ribs and skin.

I weighed the first piece of fully submerged PIC today. Immediately after pulling it from the water, it weighed .10 oz. That means in one month the 4"x1"x1" piece took on .05oz when completely submerged (almost nothing). I'm going to weigh it again in a couple of hours to see if the moisture escapes given time.

The piece that has been completely submerged for TWO months shows signs of corrosion on the foil facing, but the polyisocyanurate itself is intact (no signs of deterioration).
__________________

__________________
25' 1972 Airstream Trade Wind Land Yacht
2006 Jeep Liberty CRD (diesel)
http://BeahmStream.com
kidjedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2016, 05:29 PM   #199
Rivet Master
 
Wabbiteer's Avatar
 
1973 27' Overlander
1972 29' Ambassador
St. Paul , Minnesota
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,912
Images: 2
Blog Entries: 2
Freeze and thaw the 0.05oz almost nothing* sample 8, 12 16 times, resoak and reweigh...
__________________

Wabbiteer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2016, 07:03 PM   #200
2 Rivet Member
 
vintageracer's Avatar
 
1958 22' World Traveler
Nashville , Tennessee
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 55
After reading 15 pages of discussion on whether "To Foam or Not To Foam", Poly this and Poly that, condensation, fiberglass batting and animals, taping joints, air gaps, never really fixing the leaks in windows and rivets and more it almost makes a guy want to buy double hull fiberglass trailer like the Oliver brand travel trailer made here in Tennessee. It won't leak or have all these insulation issues.

I guess nostalgia has its price!!!
__________________
vintageracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2016, 08:04 PM   #201
Rivet Master
 
1994 30' Excella
Mississauga , Ontario
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 939
In house construction the problem is always humidity inside trying to get out. Any imperfection in the vapour barrier which is installed on the warm(inside) side of the wall allows moisture to migrate towards the outside of the wall. Since it is cold at the outer section of the wall it will condense to water droplets. Therefore it is important that the outer side of the structure is designed to allow water vapour to penetrate the house wrap and get out.
In our trailer the outer skin is hopefully totally waterproof! So where does the condensation go? Seems to me it would run down the inside of the wall and fill up the C channel. Then leak past the hold down bolts and soak into the ply floor.
To minimize this I would think a non porous solid insulation fully adhered to the outer skin would be the ideal solution. Also the inner skin should have vent holes near the floor and in the ceiling so that air could circulate and let the moisture back into the interior of the trailer when temps change.
I'm probably thinking too much!
Al
__________________
Al and Jean

TAC ON-3
BigAl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2016, 09:27 AM   #202
Rivet Master
 
J. Morgan's Avatar

 
1972 31' Sovereign
1975 31' Excella 500
Currently Looking...
Benton , Arkansas
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 5,044
Images: 11
I used fiberglass insulation, and did not seal any rivets, no vapor barrier, etc. I did calk the top third of all window frames and other openings.... But that is about it.

Sometimes we have a way of making simple things hard.


Quote:
Originally Posted by vintageracer View Post
After reading 15 pages of discussion on whether "To Foam or Not To Foam", Poly this and Poly that, condensation, fiberglass batting and animals, taping joints, air gaps, never really fixing the leaks in windows and rivets and more it almost makes a guy want to buy double hull fiberglass trailer like the Oliver brand travel trailer made here in Tennessee. It won't leak or have all these insulation issues.

I guess nostalgia has its price!!!




Brevi tempore!
__________________
The fact that I am opinionated does not presuppose that I am wrong......

J. Morgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2016, 11:52 AM   #203
3 Rivet Member
 
1972 25' Tradewind
Denver , Colorado
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wabbiteer View Post
Freeze and thaw the 0.05oz almost nothing* sample 8, 12 16 times, resoak and reweigh...
Right, but what are the chances that the double foil faced PIC panels, sealed again at the edges with foil tape, and then sealed in the walls of my Airstream will remain completely submerged for more than a month? If that happens, I've got WAY bigger problems than "moisture."

Not to mention, the test piece has a lot of exposed foam, whereas the foil in the Airstream has minimal exposed foam (it's all sealed in foil).

On top of that, within the hour, the test piece was back down to .05oz. The water weight was likely all at the edges, not penetrated to the center of a very small piece of foam --in contrast to large panels only exposed at the edge; panels where moisture couldn't even get to the center.

The test is FAR from perfect, but I only did it to get a general idea of how the PIC works with water/moisture (and the answer is: pretty darn well).
__________________
25' 1972 Airstream Trade Wind Land Yacht
2006 Jeep Liberty CRD (diesel)
http://BeahmStream.com
kidjedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2016, 11:55 AM   #204
3 Rivet Member
 
1972 25' Tradewind
Denver , Colorado
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by vintageracer View Post
...almost makes a guy want to buy double hull fiberglass trailer like the Oliver brand travel trailer made here in Tennessee. It won't leak or have all these insulation issues.

I guess nostalgia has its price!!!
Nostalgia certainly has it's price. So does caring about the look and design of the trailer. I don't want a marshmallow on wheels (I'd rather have a metal twinky).
__________________
25' 1972 Airstream Trade Wind Land Yacht
2006 Jeep Liberty CRD (diesel)
http://BeahmStream.com
kidjedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2016, 12:01 PM   #205
3 Rivet Member
 
1972 25' Tradewind
Denver , Colorado
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by J. Morgan View Post
I used fiberglass insulation, and did not seal any rivets, no vapor barrier, etc. I did calk the top third of all window frames and other openings.... But that is about it.

Sometimes we have a way of making simple things hard.
I completely agree. Sometimes you just need to get on with it with materials readily available. This is why I'm using closed cell poly foam from Lowe's (or maybe the 65 mil EPDM leftover from a roofing job) for rib insulation instead of Aerogel. It's also why I'm using the PIC (available from Home Depot) instead of spray foam (which I'd have to order special equipment for and also have to do all at once).

There's also nothing wrong with testing materials and sharing the results with other to make it easier for those who come after.
__________________
25' 1972 Airstream Trade Wind Land Yacht
2006 Jeep Liberty CRD (diesel)
http://BeahmStream.com
kidjedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2016, 12:14 PM   #206
3 Rivet Member
 
1972 25' Tradewind
Denver , Colorado
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigAl View Post
In house construction the problem is always humidity inside trying to get out. Any imperfection in the vapour barrier which is installed on the warm(inside) side of the wall allows moisture to migrate towards the outside of the wall. Since it is cold at the outer section of the wall it will condense to water droplets. Therefore it is important that the outer side of the structure is designed to allow water vapour to penetrate the house wrap and get out.
In our trailer the outer skin is hopefully totally waterproof! So where does the condensation go? Seems to me it would run down the inside of the wall and fill up the C channel. Then leak past the hold down bolts and soak into the ply floor.
To minimize this I would think a non porous solid insulation fully adhered to the outer skin would be the ideal solution. Also the inner skin should have vent holes near the floor and in the ceiling so that air could circulate and let the moisture back into the interior of the trailer when temps change.
I'm probably thinking too much!
Al
I actually considered using House Wrap at the outside skin.

I think the logic of the above is sound, but I'm actually letting any moisture that might penetrate the (hopefully sealed) outer skin run down that outside wall and into the C channel, which has weep holes (which were pre-existing; not sure if that's from the factory or a "mod" from a previous owner). Interior moisture is vented via the range hood, fantastic fans (or something similar), and exhaust vents in the toilet and shower; hopefully the interior of the walls are warm enough that it doesn't condensate anyway.

The PIC is "non-porous" (foil faced closed cell), but I'm leaving a 1/2" gap on the outer skin side, and a 1/4" gap on the interior skin side. The 1" PIC is R-7 (real R7, not the BS r-rating of Prodex and other foil-bubble wrap) and the air gaps should ad to that R value. Everything is completely sealed with the Nashua 324a foil tape (kind of expensive, but awesome).

These are the decisions I arrived at by informing myself with the information available (forums, product specs, speaking to owners, speaking to people who restore/build RV's for a living, etc.) and that will allow me to finish as quickly/cheaply as possible without worrying down the road (and in the mountains) about if I made the right decisions.
__________________
25' 1972 Airstream Trade Wind Land Yacht
2006 Jeep Liberty CRD (diesel)
http://BeahmStream.com
kidjedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2016, 02:26 PM   #207
Rivet Master
 
Wabbiteer's Avatar
 
1973 27' Overlander
1972 29' Ambassador
St. Paul , Minnesota
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,912
Images: 2
Blog Entries: 2
kidjedi: remember you're building for 40 or 50 years unless you're willing to be that Joe Somewhen that a future owner will be cussing

Just back of the napkin engineering here..

a '72 AS built in '71.. so 45 years old. Even in a milder climate there may be 90 nights below freezing (Jackson Center, Ohio is about 100) so not including day sun warming thaw cycles that is 4,000 freezing events. Denver has the most freezing nights of any large US City with 157 so that'd be 7,000 freeze cycles. That many heave-shrink events loosen seams and rivets, undercuts caulk and could make alien worlds out of dark hidden places come Bayous or Glades...

Sure a little degraded board is not insufferable immediate pain for the occupants or a structural catastrophe in the making, I'm just saying it's too darn easy to rationalize where Airstreams are concerned, they don't fit easily in the human time frame...

Now... piecing in insulation with a friction fit using barrel stave shapes between ribs with the outside faces blind to the installer and achieving near zero gaps is sure to be a manly endeavor I'd like to read about.

I've no complaint over Iso rigid board going into 70's Airstreams, with the 1-1/2" wall cavity we need all we can shoe horn in there, just don't over-simplify the process. Leaving a continuous air gap has a dark side, smokestack air convection from dissimilar temperature materials perpetually trying to equalize, either super-heated or super-cooled air spreading itself to every possible material exposure or air leak trying to get in/out of the living space. I'm of the thought that Vulkem parging over interior seams and rivets then baffling insulation against the exterior shell in small discrete sections would be superior instead of leaving the airspace, 'compartmentalizing' it all. If we're worried about occult water ingress there is always the over-pressure leak check using soapy water and a blower to periodically check for flaws...

Also: Look at Protecto Super Stick Building Tape vs. the Nashua 324a foil tape, a bunch of years down the line I think you'll appreciate you did even if it is 3x the difficulty handling it, consider adult supervision to call the rescue squad when it goes all Charlie Brown kite string trying to trim it in half or doing long runs, it's really that sticky. The Protecto SS tape is made for exterior siding window/door trim weather sealing and made to last the life of the siding in the worst conditions, has a reflective foil face and will never lift and break bond.

With some practice and a narrow/no kerf blade it'd be way smooth to lay the Iso board like bricks and barrel stave mitre the pieces together following the curves of the shell, some of the minimal expansion window/door canned foam gunned inbetween foam joints with the pistol-grip style applicators to provide caulk to seal the horizontal foam board slats with...

Letsee, your 25' has 14' straight wall so including obstructions that would be about 300 linear feet minimum of mitre cuts, then pieced to go between your 6 ribs and various stiffeners and braces less window openings makes 120ish discrete pieces to handle and install with precision. We'll be beside you all the way!

Okay, fine, sorries. I'm doing just that now with my diesel Promaster RV conversion van I'm building. The Promaster van is as tight as an aquarium compared to the AS though, I don't have 1200 rivets and a couple hundred feet of caulked sheet metal overlap seams. What I am fighting is preventing warm moist air from completely infiltrating the structure EDIT: from the RV being '24/7 occupied' in cold weather- 3M 90 spray adhesive, Loctite PL adhesive and Great Stuff foam all as glue then the foam as o-ring gasket meandering the edges of every piece.

Have a look at this insulation, I nabbed a roll to stuff boxed columns with and to stuff in all the gaps between built-ins and van body & chassis...

http://www.dupont.com/products-and-s...mawrap-r5.html
__________________

Wabbiteer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2016, 04:18 PM   #208
3 Rivet Member
 
1972 25' Tradewind
Denver , Colorado
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wabbiteer View Post
kidjedi: remember you're building for 40 or 50 years unless you're willing to be that Joe Somewhen that a future owner will be cussing
Yep! I'm planning on retiring in this thing (my house becomes my "nest egg" and this thing becomes my home!).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wabbiteer View Post
...That many heave-shrink events loosen seams and rivets, undercuts caulk and could make alien worlds out of dark hidden places come Bayous or Glades...
Right. That's why I've gone over every rivet (reriveting when necessary) and TremPro 635'd every seam.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wabbiteer View Post
Sure a little degraded board is not insufferable immediate pain for the occupants or a structural catastrophe in the making, I'm just saying it's too darn easy to rationalize where Airstreams are concerned, they don't fit easily in the human time frame...
Right, but it doesn't seem like I'm rationalizing. I hope I have done my due diligence and made the right choices.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wabbiteer View Post
Now... piecing in insulation with a friction fit using barrel stave shapes between ribs with the outside faces blind to the installer and achieving near zero gaps is sure to be a manly endeavor I'd like to read about.
Pretty close to what I'm doing. I'll have pics up on my blog when I'm finished. I'm not necessarily at near-zero gaps for the staves, because I'm not miter-edging them, but the minimal gap where the panels "curve" is air-tight with the foil tape on the backside scores. All edges on the front side are completely sealed with the foil tape (no air passes from cabin to exterior skin, except a few tiny cracks around windows).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wabbiteer View Post
I've no complaint over Iso rigid board going into 70's Airstreams, with the 1-1/2" wall cavity we need all we can shoe horn in there, just don't over-simplify the process. Leaving a continuous air gap has a dark side, smokestack air convection from dissimilar temperature materials perpetually trying to equalize, either super-heated or super-cooled air spreading itself to every possible material exposure or air leak trying to get in/out of the living space. I'm of the thought that Vulkem parging over interior seams and rivets then baffling insulation against the exterior shell in small discrete sections would be superior instead of leaving the airspace, 'compartmentalizing' it all. If we're worried about occult water ingress there is always the over-pressure leak check using soapy water and a blower to periodically check for flaws...
I've actually been wondering how the "bubble test" will work on this thing, since theoretically the insulation layer is air tight at the interior skin level. There could be leaks in the exterior skin that wouldn't show up because the air from the pressurized cabin would not escape through the walls (they are air tight), but instead would escape through windows, doors and hatches. The seal is further completed at the interior skin rivets since I'm laying rubber or foam over each rib, which will form a sort of a "healing seal" at each rivet --I guess the air can pass through the rivet, though, since it's a mandrel through a shaft and perhaps not air tight.

Regarding the "chimney effect..." I went back and forth on the air space on the outside skin. Brett at Timeless Travel Trailers seems to suggest it's the way to go (having an air gap), though Timeless actually fills the wall with the ISO board completely (no gaps). I think this has more to do with time consumption though (creating and adhering all the 1/2" standoffs takes a lot of time/work).

There's also the phrase "all Airstreams leak." Keeping up with sealing from the outside will most likely keep out enough moisture to not need to worry about it, but leaving the gap allows the inevitable small leaks to drain down the wall and out the weep holes. It seems like most people posting about how they are insulating (if not using spray foam or fiberglass batt) are using foam standoffs, either with rigid panels or Prodex/Reflectix, to keep a layer of air between the exterior skin and the first layer of insulation.

Like I said... I'm still not positive which is better (gap/no gap), but I had to do something at some point or I'd never get to use the thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wabbiteer View Post
Also: Look at Protecto Super Stick Building Tape vs. the Nashua 324a foil tape, a bunch of years down the line I think you'll appreciate you did even if it is 3x the difficulty handling it, consider adult supervision to call the rescue squad when it goes all Charlie Brown kite string trying to trim it in half or doing long runs, it's really that sticky. The Protecto SS tape is made for exterior siding window/door trim weather sealing and made to last the life of the siding in the worst conditions, has a reflective foil face and will never lift and break bond.
Sounds great, but I'm pretty much done with that part. I actually had three 3"x 60ft. rolls of the Nashua 324a that I picked up for $10 at a thrift store. I can't believe how well it sticks, even to freezing cold metal, and how thick it is. It's a billion times better than the stuff they sell along with Prodex at the big box stores. Probably also a LOT easier to use than the stuff you mention, especially with foil faced foam.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wabbiteer View Post
With some practice and a narrow/no kerf blade it'd be way smooth to lay the Iso board like bricks and barrel stave mitre the pieces together following the curves of the shell, some of the minimal expansion window/door canned foam gunned inbetween foam joints with the pistol-grip style applicators to provide caulk to seal the horizontal foam board slats with...
At that point, I see no reason why a person wouldn't just go back to the idea of spray foam. It would be way faster, way cheaper, and way more effective (sealing all cracks and crevices by sticking to everything). Plus spray foam has a higher R value than PIC panels, which come second (followed by extruded polystyrene and fiberglass batt).

I have been scoring the backs of the panels to follow the barrel curve and resealing the panels with the foil tape. This leaves a small void in the PIC where the break is, but it's sealed to airflow with the foil tape. Your suggestion might be more "ideal," but it would take forever, and again, I want to get camping.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wabbiteer View Post
Letsee, your 25' has 14' straight wall so including obstructions that would be about 300 linear feet minimum of mitre cuts, then pieced to go between your 6 ribs and various stiffeners and braces less window openings makes 120ish discrete pieces to handle and install with precision. We'll be beside you all the way!
Closer to 140 not including all the 1/2" thick stand off pieces (hundreds). Fitting the shapes to all the compound curves in the end cap was the hardest. Having the 1/2" gap on the backside and the 1/4" gap on the front side makes things a little more forgiving.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wabbiteer View Post
Okay, fine, sorries. I'm doing just that now with my diesel Promaster RV conversion van I'm building. The Promaster van is as tight as an aquarium compared to the AS though, I don't have 1200 rivets and a couple hundred feet of caulked sheet metal overlap seams. What I am fighting is preventing warm moist air from completely infiltrating the structure EDIT: from the RV being '24/7 occupied' in cold weather- 3M 90 spray adhesive, Loctite PL adhesive and Great Stuff foam all as glue then the foam as o-ring gasket meandering the edges of every piece.
I think the easier way to achieve this on a gutted Airstream is just the spray foam application everywhere (max R value for the 1.5" wall space and completely sealed at every seem and rivet by the foam).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wabbiteer View Post
Have a look at this insulation, I nabbed a roll to stuff boxed columns with and to stuff in all the gaps between built-ins and van body & chassis...

http://www.dupont.com/products-and-s...mawrap-r5.html
Seems good, but if it "breathes" and is installed pressed up against the skin, I think condensation would build up in the voids and wrinkles against the exterior skin (causing mold, etc.). In other words, the plastic bag that holds the insulation would contain the moisture where it's pressed up against the exterior skin and cause problems.

Not only that, but it's actually a lower R value than foam or polyisocyanurate (which is R6 at 1").

I'm also not sure what it costs (I'm assuming expensive) and where I'd get it. If those things weren't a concern, I'd just line the entire Airstream with Aerogel and be done with it.
__________________
25' 1972 Airstream Trade Wind Land Yacht
2006 Jeep Liberty CRD (diesel)
http://BeahmStream.com
kidjedi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-15-2016, 10:58 PM   #209
Rivet Master
 
Wabbiteer's Avatar
 
1973 27' Overlander
1972 29' Ambassador
St. Paul , Minnesota
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,912
Images: 2
Blog Entries: 2
More bread crumbs for the thousands of readers yet to visit...

Line it with Aerogel? Vacuum panels can make R-30 or better per inch. Since we're dreaming why not titanium double-wall inserts with a strong vacuum? Heh.

My commercial spray foam applicator friend invited me to apply a thin (1/4-3/8") froth coat of DIY foam on the aluminum shell to protect the metal from the high temperature catalyst reaction of commercial foam, he'd be happy to spray it then to avoid the metal warp and strong heave of hot foam in gaps distorting the shell.

Prepping the inside of the shell metal before foaming it would be an acid wash and passivization treatments, Alodine is a chemical treatment of aluminum to prevent corrosion and would be used as a primer for the spray foam to grip to. The unfoamed resins contact with the metal would bond extremely well and there'd be no worry of it tearing off the aluminum oxide layer of aged untreated aluminum and holding water or loosing structural strength.

Quote:
Plus spray foam has a higher R value than PIC panels
Still air alone has an insulating value of R-5 per inch of thickness. Once spray foams bubble-making 'blow agents' no longer are perfused throughout the bubble matrix and just air (humid air) replaces it the R-value drops to, or close to, R5 no matter the brand. When they allowed heavy Freon molecules as blow agent foams performed better longer since freon molecules were more easily trapped. With the new environmentally safe blow agents escaping easier the foam performance degrades faster.

Even our Iso foam R-value will drop by 20% within five years or sooner depending on environment. Spray foam makers will advertise an 'aged' R-Value but that is usually six months at 72F, not SoCa and 200F sun heating or -20F in places with real winters; expect the advertised values to dive quicker & deeper then.

Prodex is not sold in big-box stores, don't confuse foil/bubble/foil with foil/foam/foil. Prodex is an honest R-0.7 that happens to be real good at herding heat in the direction physics dictates, hot upward and cold downward, when available space allows the air gaps.

Did someone say too darn easy to rationalize? Tyvek Thermowrap is not 'bagged' and is as nearly inert as any insulation can be. Getting into creative uses, there could be standoffs to keep the housewrap side mostly away from touching the exterior shell, as you mentioned you'd considered. Remember it's not a vapor barrier and sun heating & winter dry air desiccation would go a long way to drying it out if/when flooded. Placed with the weave on the vertical it'd also channel live water downwards quicker...

Just more data for lucky future restorers to ponder.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	tyvek_thermawrap.jpg
Views:	51
Size:	37.1 KB
ID:	255752  
__________________

Wabbiteer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2016, 10:04 AM   #210
2 Rivet Member
 
vintageracer's Avatar
 
1958 22' World Traveler
Nashville , Tennessee
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by kidjedi View Post
Nostalgia certainly has it's price. So does caring about the look and design of the trailer. I don't want a marshmallow on wheels (I'd rather have a metal twinky).

Marshmallow or Twinky they are both "Tasty"!!!
__________________

__________________
vintageracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Spray polyurethane foam insulation sfixx Exterior Restoration Forum 58 05-29-2011 09:45 AM
Spray Foam Insulation Question Gkiesel General Repair Forum 3 04-08-2008 02:08 PM
Foam Insulation? '69 Caravel Maximo General Repair Forum 3 03-02-2008 08:42 PM
Spray insulation chalcedon Exterior Restoration Forum 6 03-17-2006 10:37 PM
expanding foam insulation DinubaDave Exterior Restoration Forum 8 06-30-2005 09:19 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:03 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.