Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-03-2016, 07:54 AM   #15
3 Rivet Member

 
1964 24' Tradewind
Lawrence , Kansas
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 201
Thanks again. You have been very helpful. I am not sure about the Big Stretch caulk though. The paint would still be more brittle than the caulk. Makes me wonder about scoring a seam like you would cement or masking and painting to a seam and then masking the other side of the seam. If you ever get a chance please post a picture of the cracking. I think it might be true of what ever paint one used. The color you used looks like a good match for the painted rivets you can get from VTS which might be a bonus in the future.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SuzyHomemakr View Post
I used FLX-0017, sort of a sand color. The flecks are kinda subtle, I was actually hoping for something a bit bigger. Through its formulation and colors, it really smooths out gouges and scratches. I wish that I'd used some of that Big Stretch caulk on the seams, as that's where I've had some cracking from the trailer flexing.
__________________

__________________
ttbikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2016, 09:15 AM   #16
Rivet Master
 
Mixter's Avatar
 
1976 27' Overlander
Tampa , Florida
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by lornahanen View Post
I have close to the same year and model. I had doubts but I painted anyway, and it turned out killer. I used a Kelly Moore glossy latex. Be brave my fellow fuselage dweller!
Sooo.... I havent thought about the cracking on the seams... Is yours cracking? Got any pics you can share?
__________________

__________________
Mixter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2016, 09:16 AM   #17
Rivet Master
 
Mixter's Avatar
 
1976 27' Overlander
Tampa , Florida
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by SuzyHomemakr View Post
I would say the texture is rougher than regular paint, but smoother than sand paint. It hides a lot of sins! Contact your local Zolatone dealer, and ask for sample chips.

You can paint a bit at a time, it doesn't seam from old to new. I used a chip brush to stipple in the edges, sort of jamming it straight in. The product is applied in two stages, first a base coat (which they call "primer"), then the multi-color coat with the funny roller.

They custom blend every batch, so be sure to order enough for the entire job. I wound up not doing the center stripe on the ceiling, and also left the bathroom white. I had a lot left over. That stuff is expensive!
That looks great. Do you have more pics to show the renovated look and the cracking areas?
Thanks!
__________________
Mixter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2016, 09:59 AM   #18
3 Rivet Member
 
1973 23' Safari
1970 27' Overlander
Boerne , Texas
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 179
sticky walls

Just purchased a new to me 1970 overlander that has already been part-way renovated. Newly painted a several months ago according to PO. Paint is adhered well, but is slightly sticky. Any advice to correct this without stripping and starting over?
Thanks,
Greg
__________________
Greg1410 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2016, 10:20 AM   #19
Rivet Master
 
toastie's Avatar
 
Currently Looking...
1955 22' Safari
Great Lake State , .
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,459
None better the IronClad

https://www.benjaminmoore.com/bm/cms...pository/30014

toastie
__________________
toastie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2016, 05:32 AM   #20
2 Rivet Member
 
1971 18' Caravel
1970 27' Overlander
Vintage Kin Owner
Hawthorne , Florida
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 82
I've been reading this thread with interest, but am confused about what surfaces you all are painting over.

I'm working on a 1966 Avion (27'). Someone painted over the factory-applied paint, probably long ago, and the result has been much cracking and peeling. Ugly in the extreme. I've been stripping this down to bare metal (aluminum skin . . . a few corner panels have turned out to be fiberglass.) This has been tedious, stinky and painful (aircraft stripper in the eye hurts for a couple days). Worse still, some of the paint adheres extremely well, and I can't seem to get it all down to shiny aluminum. Keep wishing I had the use of metal scrapers and sandpaper. Plastic scrapers are soooo wimpy! And what they call plastic razor blades are a joke.

Anyway . . . before the question of what primer and paint . . . what surface prep is required? Could I get away with less than perfect stripping job and use something that has a little texture, like Zolatone, to hide small patches where I have been unable to get down to clean bare metal. Maybe hit the edges with garnet paper to make sure transitions don't have edges? I've been wiping with paint thinner to clean up residuals. Is that adequate?
__________________
sandgrubber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2016, 08:26 AM   #21
3 Rivet Member

 
1964 24' Tradewind
Lawrence , Kansas
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 201
Surface prep is very important to any paint job. A new coat of paint can not be any more stable than what is underneath it. If you have a bad peeling surface you need to get it off before painting. If the old surface is stable, it still needs to be cleaned and sanded. There are some "liquid sand" products that can be used. When selecting a paint for an Airstream, you need to select one that can withstand temperature changes, same as an exterior paint but, one not made to chalk like some exterior house paints. A good way to go is to talk to the paint store salesman that has some experience. A paint made for exterior lawn furniture is a safe bet (made for metal surfaces and harsh conditions). There are lots of good products, but a little research it a good thing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sandgrubber View Post
I've been reading this thread with interest, but am confused about what surfaces you all are painting over.

I'm working on a 1966 Avion (27'). Someone painted over the factory-applied paint, probably long ago, and the result has been much cracking and peeling. Ugly in the extreme. I've been stripping this down to bare metal (aluminum skin . . . a few corner panels have turned out to be fiberglass.) This has been tedious, stinky and painful (aircraft stripper in the eye hurts for a couple days). Worse still, some of the paint adheres extremely well, and I can't seem to get it all down to shiny aluminum. Keep wishing I had the use of metal scrapers and sandpaper. Plastic scrapers are soooo wimpy! And what they call plastic razor blades are a joke.

Anyway . . . before the question of what primer and paint . . . what surface prep is required? Could I get away with less than perfect stripping job and use something that has a little texture, like Zolatone, to hide small patches where I have been unable to get down to clean bare metal. Maybe hit the edges with garnet paper to make sure transitions don't have edges? I've been wiping with paint thinner to clean up residuals. Is that adequate?
__________________
ttbikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2016, 10:06 AM   #22
Rivet Master
 
J. Morgan's Avatar

 
1972 31' Sovereign
1975 31' Excella 500
Currently Looking...
Benton , Arkansas
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 5,046
Images: 11
Painting the inside walls

If you "feather" the edges that will not strip off via sanding with a moderately course sandpaper like 80 grit, and then priming the transition, and sanding the primed areas and the rest of the panel with 320 or 400 grit.

(You could get away with a 220 grit final sanding if you are using latex or a non glossy/smooth paint.

There is a pretty large transition of this kind hidden using this method pictured. Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByAirstream Forums1457712342.996116.jpg
Views:	75
Size:	278.2 KB
ID:	258566Click image for larger version

Name:	ImageUploadedByAirstream Forums1457712367.340924.jpg
Views:	76
Size:	279.9 KB
ID:	258567

The "line" is 100% invisible in the finished product. The surface does not have to be 100% level, it just has to look 100% level. The sheen and the smoothness of the finished product will determine how smooth and even a repair needs to be to look smooth and even. It is about blending in a repair with its surroundings.

FWIW, I SHOULD have stripped all of the finish off that deck lid, but it was taking way too long so I traded a more perfect fix for several hours of my time. That is how a person gets a job finished sometimes.

One more edit, where you stripped the aluminum to bare metal, you MUST sand it dull for good adhesion.

If you will prime before paint sand between about 120 grit and 220. If no prime, sand between about 220 and 320.

Keep in mind that paint left on the surface will scratch more easily than bare metal, so it needs to be sanded with finer paper.


Talis gentium ceciderunt.
__________________
The fact that I am opinionated does not presuppose that I am wrong......

J. Morgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2016, 10:30 AM   #23
Rivet Master
 
J. Morgan's Avatar

 
1972 31' Sovereign
1975 31' Excella 500
Currently Looking...
Benton , Arkansas
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 5,046
Images: 11
This sounds like a lot of sanding, it is.

A good dual action sander is a must to do a project of this nature.

If you have a large air compressor, (at least a quality 5 HP) air powered is best, but Milwaukee makes a respectable electric DA sander.


Talis gentium ceciderunt.
__________________
The fact that I am opinionated does not presuppose that I am wrong......

J. Morgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2016, 07:06 PM   #24
2 Rivet Member
 
1971 18' Caravel
1970 27' Overlander
Vintage Kin Owner
Hawthorne , Florida
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 82
Thanks J. Morgan and ttbikes. I'm confused. I thought sanding aluminum with regular sandpaper was taboo. Is that just for the exterior?

Look forward to changing tactics. I'd much rather be shaken to bits by a dual action sander than poisoned with corrosive volatile hydrocarbons.
__________________
sandgrubber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2016, 08:42 PM   #25
Rivet Master
 
J. Morgan's Avatar

 
1972 31' Sovereign
1975 31' Excella 500
Currently Looking...
Benton , Arkansas
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 5,046
Images: 11
If a person is going to polish aluminum, sanding can be a big problem, but when preparing for paint it is necessary in my humble opinion.

I have sanded A LOT of aluminum in preparation for paint.


Talis gentium ceciderunt.
__________________
The fact that I am opinionated does not presuppose that I am wrong......

J. Morgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2016, 10:16 PM   #26
Rivet Master
 
J. Morgan's Avatar

 
1972 31' Sovereign
1975 31' Excella 500
Currently Looking...
Benton , Arkansas
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 5,046
Images: 11
Painting the inside walls

http://i245.photobucket.com/albums/g...s/DSCN0338.jpg

I have done this a lot of times.....

You can see that we had to use stripper near the edges of the doors, before we painted, we sanded the shine away there too.

If memory serves that is a 320 grit scratch.


Talis gentium ceciderunt.
__________________
The fact that I am opinionated does not presuppose that I am wrong......

J. Morgan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2016, 08:30 AM   #27
3 Rivet Member

 
1964 24' Tradewind
Lawrence , Kansas
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 201
For the purpose of getting good paint adherence on metal but not wanting the sand marks to show though the paint, I would not use any thing coarser then 320 grit. However, this would be a rule of thumb, depending on type of paint used and other conditions. The thicker the paint coating type the more likely to hide imperfections. More coats with sanding in between coats the more imperfections hidden. Some paints (like Zylotone) are two coat applications that lay on thick and hide more.
__________________
ttbikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-12-2016, 09:30 AM   #28
Rivet Master
 
Minno's Avatar

 
1972 31' Sovereign
Lexington , Minnesota
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 3,323
One coat of Bondz primer, 2 coats of exterior latex paint. 5 years in Minnesota freeze/thaw and no problems.

Kay
__________________

__________________
Minno is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Painting Walls of Bambi Marshall44 Upholstery, Blinds, Walls & Interior Finishes 13 04-19-2010 02:25 PM
Painting 1984 Excella Walls Aluminumb 1984 -1986 Excella 5 10-22-2007 08:51 AM
Thoughts on painting oak cabinets & walls potatoes Cabinets, Counter Tops & Furnishings 17 01-16-2006 11:56 AM
Painting Interior walls, Ceiling DJbyRequest General Interior Topics 37 05-29-2005 10:51 PM
Painting plastic walls and bathroom sink jwaldin Upholstery, Blinds, Walls & Interior Finishes 4 11-14-2003 09:37 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.