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Old 09-07-2016, 07:29 PM   #1
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2006 25' Safari
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Huge project mobile Barbershop

Hi, I'm new to Airstreams and I just bought a gutted 2006 25fb Safari. I'm at a lost right now and any tips or advice would help. I'm trying to convert the first picture to the second one all on my own. I need to know what type of screws to use to mount mirrors and secure cabinets and other fabricated parts. I need to know how to secure chairs to the subfloor. How I should run my plumbing to get rid of the tank vents sitting in the middle of the floor. How to install laminate flooring if there's is a special way to do so. What type of brackets to purchase. How to mount mirrors on a curved wall, etc. if you can give me any advice. Anything would help. Thank you. And I will post progress pics as I begin the build. Thanks in advance.

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Old 09-08-2016, 09:31 AM   #2
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First off, congratulations! Second, you have some work cut out for you and an exciting project! I'll attempt to offer some advice one by one.

"I need to know what type of screws to use to mount mirrors and secure cabinets and other fabricated parts."

Unfortunately, you don't have the original to study. I will suggest to use rivets when possible for mounts to the interior skin. You should expect to construct unique mounts curved to fit the walls with flanges to accept the rivets. Short sheet metal screws can also be used.


"I need to know how to secure chairs to the subfloor."

I would use T-nuts ( http://www.lowes.com/pd/The-Hillman-...e-Nuts/4312131 ) recessed and screwed to the floor. This would allow you to unbolt the chairs for relocation and cleaning.


"How I should run my plumbing to get rid of the tank vents sitting in the middle of the floor."

The tank vents allow for the correct physical operation of the holding tanks. You might be able to relocate them, but your not going to "get rid of them" unless you are willing to not use holding tanks.

In order to relocate them, you will have to remove a section of the plywood subfloor where the original vent enters the tank. Now you will have to cap the opening in the tank and repair the floor. You now may install a new vent closer to the side wall. Note this will still be around 18 inches inboard. You will again have to open the subfloor and install a new fitting to the tank.

Now the bad news. You have some serious roof work to do to close off the old vent output and install a new one! Good luck. I wouldn't want to do it.

You can hide the vent pipe in a creative cabinet build.


"How to install laminate flooring if there's is a special way to do so."

Google search on the forum is your friend here. Tons of info.

"What type of brackets to purchase. How to mount mirrors on a curved wall, etc."

Your not going to purchase anything. A good workshop is very helpful to have.

if you can give me any advice. Anything would help. Thank you. And I will post progress pics as I begin the build. Thanks in advance.

My advice, if you have skills, tools, and funding, this project could be great. If not, you need a big wallet!

Personally, I would love to do a job like this. Good Luck.
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Old 09-08-2016, 10:05 AM   #3
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The second photo appears to be a professional rebuild. Is it possible to find out who did the conversion and contact them? I have seen a couple of beauty parlor/barber conversions that were professionally converted.
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Old 09-08-2016, 11:08 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanB View Post
First off, congratulations! Second, you have some work cut out for you and an exciting project! I'll attempt to offer some advice one by one.

"I need to know what type of screws to use to mount mirrors and secure cabinets and other fabricated parts."

Unfortunately, you don't have the original to study. I will suggest to use rivets when possible for mounts to the interior skin. You should expect to construct unique mounts curved to fit the walls with flanges to accept the rivets. Short sheet metal screws can also be used.


"I need to know how to secure chairs to the subfloor."

I would use T-nuts ( http://www.lowes.com/pd/The-Hillman-...e-Nuts/4312131 ) recessed and screwed to the floor. This would allow you to unbolt the chairs for relocation and cleaning.


"How I should run my plumbing to get rid of the tank vents sitting in the middle of the floor."

The tank vents allow for the correct physical operation of the holding tanks. You might be able to relocate them, but your not going to "get rid of them" unless you are willing to not use holding tanks.

In order to relocate them, you will have to remove a section of the plywood subfloor where the original vent enters the tank. Now you will have to cap the opening in the tank and repair the floor. You now may install a new vent closer to the side wall. Note this will still be around 18 inches inboard. You will again have to open the subfloor and install a new fitting to the tank.

Now the bad news. You have some serious roof work to do to close off the old vent output and install a new one! Good luck. I wouldn't want to do it.

You can hide the vent pipe in a creative cabinet build.


"How to install laminate flooring if there's is a special way to do so."

Google search on the forum is your friend here. Tons of info.

"What type of brackets to purchase. How to mount mirrors on a curved wall, etc."

Your not going to purchase anything. A good workshop is very helpful to have.

if you can give me any advice. Anything would help. Thank you. And I will post progress pics as I begin the build. Thanks in advance.

My advice, if you have skills, tools, and funding, this project could be great. If not, you need a big wallet!

Personally, I would love to do a job like this. Good Luck.

Thank you for this. Is the interior aluminum really that strong to hold mirrors and tvs? Would you suggest sheet metal screws or rivets for heavy objects like these? And what type of rivets should I use?
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Old 09-08-2016, 11:18 AM   #5
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Looks like a great idea, and a big project.

Good luck,


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Old 09-08-2016, 11:44 AM   #6
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Just musing here..

With multiple sinks do not skimp on pipe size or number of vents, question: is this an anchored and plumbed boutique or will it be mobile? For mobile the needed grey water tank(s) sizes could be a challenge to install and keep the weight balanced when it's time to haul everything back to home base.

My '73 had at least one PVC vent line they'd heated and bent to conform to the curve of the shell; forcing the plastic into arcs did crush the interior diameter down somewhat in places but they avoided 'pinching' it off too badly, note this isn't hidden pipe just able to be covered with wall built-ins. The '73 shell style is 1-1/2" deep rib cavity, 1 1/4" Schd 40 pipe OD is 1.660, your 2006 has larger cavity between shell layers so might be 'do-able' to have vent pipe hidden between liner/shell.

On the chairs - having 200 pound chairs with 200 pound customers trampolining through all day will stress the plywood flooring in a short while, sag or dips and open up the sheet joints, having them placed between the floor spars with an additional bridge layer and some metal spar reinforcing, going to a thicker plywood sheet might be ideas to explore. Getting the subflooring sealed to avoid moisture softening it up over time is worth a look, even in a dry climate the air conditioning will be coldest at floor level and so condensation from beneath is entirely possible.
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Old 09-08-2016, 12:13 PM   #7
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Sounds like you need someone else doing this IMO.
Hopefully you got a good deal so you can pay someone to do remodel.

Most likely you'll need to reinforce areas for mirrors, seats. The plumbing will be difficult as well, cabinets..yikes.
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Old 09-08-2016, 12:30 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cutsmiths View Post
Thank you for this. Is the interior aluminum really that strong to hold mirrors and tvs? Would you suggest sheet metal screws or rivets for heavy objects like these? And what type of rivets should I use?
You would preferably locate the heavier interior items such that you can anchor to the vertical ribs. That way you're taking advantage of the strongest parts of the shell. If not, you need to build bridging elements such that you can transfer the load to the ribs. This is especially important if you plan to make this parlor mobile, because any road bump you hit while moving the trailer will impart significant load to the mounts. This is also why you'd use rivets (1/8" or 3/16" shank diameter) in sufficient number to ensure they are not overloaded even on a sharp road shock. Screws will loosen over time and you might not catch one coming loose, until the thing it was holding up falls down.
If you dont' want the visible interior to be excessively cluttered by mounts reaching everywhere, then you need to build in additional reinforcing ribs between the inner and outer skins (and tie everything together with appropriate fasteners, both for looks and support function). Hammer-forming aluminum (ribs) over a wooden buck is a common light-aircraft construction method; you will need to become familiar with that or find someone who is, in order to be able to mount all your stuff.

The other posters' concerns are also significant. You need to design this whole thing as a system, where the understructure is sufficient to support the chairs, sinks, and customers, and where it's moveable as your business requires.

It may well be that the reference picture you showed, actually has the trailer shell resting on a completely custom built chassis complete with up-rated axles, in order to handle the load. Just because it looks clean and uncluttered on the inside does not mean that there isn't all kinds of new construction under the floor and inside the walls - in fact I'd expect it.

Having said that - I think this would be a great project to undertake, but I have thirty years of electrical/electronics, amateur race car construction, home renovation, and metal fabrication behind me. I know where to get materials and how to shape and attach them for strength and robustness, and I have the tools. It kind of sounds like you might be in over your head unless you find a mentor who can guide you through this.
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Old 09-08-2016, 01:29 PM   #9
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Very novel idea, presuming you're a good barber this could be a winner. Even though you're project is a "do it yourself", you're still going to need parts, technical assistance and probable a professional to get through certain areas of this re-build. I see you're in California so help is not far away. Vinnie's Northbay Airstream Repairs (check out website) is located in Santa Rosa, Calif. and he is a an Airstream expert on repairs, rebuilds and anything to do with newer Airstreams. He works on & supplies parts for 2000 model year & newer. Good luck!
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Old 09-08-2016, 08:32 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cutsmiths View Post
I need to know what type of screws to use to mount mirrors and secure cabinets and other fabricated parts. I need to know how to secure chairs to the subfloor. How I should run my plumbing to get rid of the tank vents sitting in the middle of the floor. How to install laminate flooring if there's is a special way to do so. What type of brackets to purchase. How to mount mirrors on a curved wall, etc. if you can give me any advice. Anything would help. Thank you. And I will post progress pics as I begin the build. Thanks in advance.
Rivnuts are a good option to consider for installing heavier items to the aluminum walls. They are easy to install and spread the load over a larger area than a screw or rivet.

They also allow for items to be easily removed, as long as you can get to the bolt heads.

Sheet metal screws, or better yet pop rivets, can be used for lighter items. I'm not sure that you could purchase brackets for mounting mirrors to curved walls, but you could probably fabricate something with basic metal working tools. If you're going to be taking this trailer on the road you could consider a mirror mount that would allow you to remove the mirror and store it in a safe place during travel.

As mentioned in a previous post, the floor as it is may not be rigid enough to support the chairs. I think you will need to add blocking below to strengthen the floor at that point, although if you used chairs with a large base as shown in the photo that would go a long way toward providing stability.

You also need to consider the weight of the trailer to ensure that you don't overload the axles. You could weigh the trailer empty and then weigh the items that you will add. Don't forget to include the weight of water in holding tanks if you'll be travelling with them full. It's also important to consider the distribution of weight forward and to the rear of the axle to keep a safe tongue weight. Even with the correct tongue weight you don't want really heavy objects to the rear of the trailer as that can increase the risk of sway and stress the frame.
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Old 09-08-2016, 09:31 PM   #11
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I'm working on restoration proofing mine right now. I am really lucky in that I don't need water and don't want electricity, so that solved two major issues for me. The forums here have been amazingly helpful. Good luck.
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Old 09-09-2016, 12:39 AM   #12
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I'm thinking I'm definitely way over my head on this project. I think I may just keep the toilet where it stands. Seal the floor to prevent moisture and softening of the subfloor. Laying laminate above that and having stations in three different areas as opposed to one long station and all that weight sitting on one side. Keeping this project simple will keep stress levels down and once I have my business profitable then I can make a kickass trailer like the picture.
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