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Old 02-20-2013, 11:04 AM   #15
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I'm a little late to the party for this thread but have been researching this same idea, a safe in the airstream. I'm coming to the conclusion that a safe in the tow vehicle for small valuables (spare cash & credit card, Wallet, Ipad, gps, etc.) is the way to go. Something like Autosafes.net sells.

I have a locking tuffy box for a console in my jeep for this purpose. I once parked my topless jeep at a trailhead where most every other car was broken into but my jeep was left alone (the police noticed this and I had to answer a few extra questions LOL). Could be that the locking box in plain view was more trouble then it was worth to try and open it. Or... It could have been that my jeep is such a rust bucket that they figured nothing of value could be in it.

Any thoughts on this vs. a similar safe in the airstream?
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Old 02-20-2013, 12:42 PM   #16
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My earlier thread covers most of the questions about this product but I'll touch on it. Mostly the buyer needs to ask themselves questions and weigh the options.
1 What am I protecting from? Fire,burglary,safety, one or all?
2) What is the dollar value of what I'm storing?
3) How accessible do I need it to be?
4) What material am I mounting it to?

Keep in mind the word "safe" is misused and misleading. Anything can be kept safe but from what? Remember thieves don't care what they damage and its only as good as what it's mounted to. ie a plastic console. In all cases obscurity helps but is not always convenient.
If it was me, the ideal safe to protect from burglary and fire would be a small BF rated safe with a UL rated digital keypad. Then it must be bolted down properly. The only way to truly secure it in your Airstream is to bolt it to the frame. Any rating higher than that would be a waste unless you are storing more than 5000 in value. If you are we can talk further but as far as the console "safe" be careful what you store in that! Remember, its mounted to plastic.
Rob
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Old 02-20-2013, 02:51 PM   #17
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Everyone's situation is different.

Theft of contents from inside RVs parked in campgrounds, that are in daily use, is vanishingly rare.

Thefts occurring in campgrounds almost always involve generators, ATVs, boat motors, or other unsecured items outside. There are also thefts from cars and trucks.
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Old 02-20-2013, 02:56 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jinkers View Post
I have a locking tuffy box for a console in my jeep for this purpose. I once parked my topless jeep at a trailhead where most every other car was broken into but my jeep was left alone (the police noticed this and I had to answer a few extra questions LOL). Could be that the locking box in plain view was more trouble then it was worth to try and open it. Or... It could have been that my jeep is such a rust bucket that they figured nothing of value could be in it.

Any thoughts on this vs. a similar safe in the airstream?
Either can be opened in under a minute with a pry bar. But sometimes the thief doesn't have any tools other than a rock.

I don't travel with much in the way of valuables, and I keep my wallet and phone with me any time I leave the trailer.
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Old 02-20-2013, 06:05 PM   #19
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Same as above.. I tend to take my wallet, phone, concealed firearm, with me when ever I leave the trailer or TV.
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Old 02-20-2013, 06:46 PM   #20
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I have a small gun lock box with push buttons on it. The box slides onto a steel plate and when locked it can't be removed. I have several of the mounting plates and move it between trailer, boat, house, and truck as needed. Holds a couple of guns and few small items. Most Airstreams have a few ares which have pull out panels and only another owner of a similar trailer would know where they are, that is where the lock box lives. Not fire proof or pry bar proof. More than likely the cost of the damage to get in the trailer will be more than the value of items taken.
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Old 02-20-2013, 08:40 PM   #21
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Most of the firearms instructors I have met suggest that it's important to have a lock box of some kind, that at least precludes access by children, in whatever car or other vehicle you drive. This accommodates visits to areas where weapons are prohibited without the safety problems and, in some jurisdictions, exposure to prosecution that would come from leaving a weapon completely unsecured in the car.

I wouldn't find such storage useful in the trailer, but again, your situation may be different.
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Old 02-21-2013, 10:07 AM   #22
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I understand the limitations of a safe. I broke into my own Walmart "gun Locker" once and was so scared of how easy and how fast I was able to get in I purchased a full on 800 lb gun safe. Of course that's not 100% either just increases the time, tools and skill the intended thief needs.

However, I believe that half an effort to lock things up deters 90% of the potential thefts. Wallets get lost or stolen while being carried and I always keep an emergency stash when traveling. I'm not planning on storing a gun (which seems to be the focus of this thread and maybe I chose the wrong thread to post in), I am more interested in locking up emergency cash, credit card, passport, phone list for credit cards & banks and small electronics like a gps when not in use or my Ipad. Aside from those items I don't really carry too much else worth locking up that isn't too big to lock up.

A console safe or something under the back seat that is not visible from outside the vehicle seems like a good option. What I am really interested in is opinions of the location of a safe, in a nook in the airstream somewhere or in the tow vehicle. Mostly because I'm not that informed on crime in and around campgrounds and wonder which is more likely to be targeted.

Thanks to all for the responses
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Old 02-21-2013, 01:24 PM   #23
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OK, I get it. I think your chances would be much better in the Airstream than in the tow vehicle.

Thieves are always paranoid about being caught in the act even though it's rare -- when they get caught, it's because they have the stolen goods. The lack of visibility out, and the presence of only one escape route, leads thieves to avoid the insides of RVs -- except at night in storage lots and industrial locations where they don't think anyone will show up.
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