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Old 04-29-2014, 09:57 AM   #1
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1976 31' Sovereign
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1971 21' Globetrotter
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Condensation

I have just purchased a '71 Globetrotter and it's totally stripped. Lots of rot, no plumbing or wiring. I've stripped some of the interior out and found wet insulation, or evidence of wetness. I was in the A/S working when it was raining and watched as condensation formed and ran down the interior walls. I have read most of the discussions of types of insulation and will probably go with fiberglass. The original insulation was glued to the exterior shell and left no room for "dead airspace". Should I worry about the condensation and if so what can I do about it?
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Old 04-29-2014, 05:18 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Stone Ridge View Post
I have just purchased a '71 Globetrotter and it's totally stripped. Lots of rot, no plumbing or wiring. I've stripped some of the interior out and found wet insulation, or evidence of wetness. I was in the A/S working when it was raining and watched as condensation formed and ran down the interior walls. I have read most of the discussions of types of insulation and will probably go with fiberglass. The original insulation was glued to the exterior shell and left no room for "dead airspace". Should I worry about the condensation and if so what can I do about it?
The number-one best defense against condensation is ventilation, particularly force ventilation. If there's enough of a breeze inside that you can actually feel the air moving, you'll not see much if any condensation even on the most humid of days.

Although it's not a trailer, I can illustrate the point with a story from my own experience… At one of our navigation locks, there is a machinery room below the normal water level. In the past, that machinery room always had at least foot of water standing in it even with a sump pump running, and the lock personnel thought there was a leak through the walls— but it was actually condensation because the machinery room air was hotter than the walls that had colder water outside. We added forced ventilation sized to provide 6 air changes per hour, and within a month, there was no standing water at all, not even enough to trigger the sump pump. The ventilation was the only thing we changed.
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