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Old 01-07-2013, 03:32 PM   #15
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I think a wood stove will help get rid of condensation in your trailer.
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Old 01-07-2013, 04:08 PM   #16
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Someone put a marine stove in their airstream. It was adorable.

You might find it on the forums, somewhere. I would find it for you, but I can't find things for myself.

I'm sure a little woodstove would bake any moisture out of a trailer. We have to use a humidifier on the woodstove at home, to add moisture to the air.


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Old 01-07-2013, 04:52 PM   #17
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I think a wood stove will help get rid of condensation in your trailer.
Anything that raises the air temperature lowers the relative humidity. Unless water vapor is a combustion byproduct, anyway. Doesn't matter if it's an electric heater, propane, diesel, or wood.
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Old 01-07-2013, 05:59 PM   #18
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thanks, had a look at pic 7 and that is pretty much how we are going to install the woodstove, in the same spot too. That woodstove is probably a bit bigger and wider than the one we will put in. But the cladding looks like the sort we will have, with the air space between.
We have still got to save some more pennies to buy it yet, it'll probably be Summer by the time we do! So will probably have to find a 'stop gap' heat source that doesn't cost too much in the meantime.

cheers

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Old 01-07-2013, 06:06 PM   #19
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When heating our old motorhome with a calor gas heater the condensation was horrendous, so I am hoping that there will be less with a woodstove.
All this info that you guys are giving is fantastic, keep it coming.
there is a UK forum for Airstreams but not too many people on it as you can imagine and you have to wait for days to get responses. Nobody around with a towable AS either,theyr'e all stuck on sites for holiday makers or in peoples gardens for 'man dens' or playhouses or offices which is a shame.
Ideally would opt for a diesel heater perhaps but they are really really expensive and we have spent pretty much everything we have on restoring the AS so far.

cheers

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Old 01-07-2013, 06:19 PM   #20
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When heating our old motorhome with a calor gas heater the condensation was horrendous, so I am hoping that there will be less with a woodstove.
When you burn gas one of the byproducts of the combustion is water vapor, so non-vented gas heaters are bad with condensation.

With the wood stove you'll be sucking the warm, moist air into the stove for combustion and sending it up the chimney. As the stove burns, a constant supply of dry air from outside will be coming into the trailer through a cracked window or roof vent.

You'll definitely see a major improvement, and it's not just because the temperature rose as suggested earlier. That's only true in a closed environment where your combustion air is drawn from, and exhausted to, the outdoors, as with our furnaces.

Good luck.
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Old 01-07-2013, 06:21 PM   #21
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Anything that raises the air temperature lowers the relative humidity. Unless water vapor is a combustion byproduct, anyway. Doesn't matter if it's an electric heater, propane, diesel, or wood.
I figured the stove would be sucking humid air out of the trailer while radiating heat into the trailer.
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Old 01-07-2013, 06:25 PM   #22
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You'll definitely see a major improvement, and it's not just because the temperature rose as suggested earlier. That's only true in a closed environment where your combustion air is drawn from, and exhausted to, the outdoors, as with our furnaces.

Good luck.
The OP said he's be using a double flue, so he will be drawing combustion air from outside, and exhausting it to outside.
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Old 01-07-2013, 06:32 PM   #23
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The OP said he's be using a double flue, so he will be drawing combustion air from outside, and exhausting it to outside.
When the original poster referred to a double flue, I believe she simply meant double insulated and did not mean for purpose of drawing in combustion air from outside. It's not possible to draw air down a heated double walled flue without a fan source and that's much too complex for a wood burner.
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Old 01-07-2013, 06:40 PM   #24
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I figured the stove would be sucking humid air out of the trailer while radiating heat into the trailer.
Well, that's what our wood stove does, in our house.


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Old 01-07-2013, 06:54 PM   #25
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OK, This is WAY outa my 1st hand knowledge zone, but that has not stopped my from posting before.

What if it was a wood pellet fed t-stat controlled type mini furnace?

My camping buddy has a pellet fed mini smoker and you set it and forget it makes heat. Later food comes out.

Pellets consistant, controlled, auto feeding, designed for minimal ash etc etc.

Fire away, its just another hair brained idea. I'm trying to write a book about them, no author, no publisher, no readers yet.
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Old 01-08-2013, 02:59 AM   #26
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The marine stove in my previous post draws air for combustion from outside. The operating instructions say to make sure the door is tightly closed, or it will draw air from the living space and/or allow exhaust gases (e.g., carbon monoxide) inside. Seems like you would want the air for combustion to be drawn from outside; otherwise, warm inside air would be drawn up the flue.
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Old 01-08-2013, 05:33 AM   #27
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When I lived on my boat we heated with a model 211 shipmate www.shipmatestove.com/ that would do a great job with a tiny firebox and an oven about the size of a shoebox. It made the best tasting biscuits in the world. I now heat my house with a cast iron air-tight stove that also does a fine job. Sometimes everything on The Forums has to turn into rocket science. When I was a little kid a long time ago we had a coal stove in the kitchen and a coal furnace in the cellar. Mom finished 8th grade and Dad got as far as 5th and we survived somehow. Go for it. Once you learn about banking a fire you're good to go. Sal
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Old 01-08-2013, 07:05 AM   #28
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I like your style Sal. We are definately trying to simplify our lives and the woodstove seems like a good way to provide heat simply.
The double walled flue is for insulation. The woodstove will need the draw from the flue to keep the fire burning. Seems I've stepped into a minefield of uncertainty.
We are struggling to keep our business alive at the moment, so thinking of simpler way of life with fewer bills is just about keeping me sane.

cheers

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