Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-18-2018, 12:57 PM   #1
New Member
 
2006 34' Classic S/O
Floyd , Virginia
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 4
Omg Iím so green at this!

I am a single woman living in my 34 foot airstream classic and just bought it in July this year. I am living in the mountains in southwest Virginia and we just had our first winter ice storm and I was without power for five days. I had not really prepared the airstream for winter and still havenít as I was gone out of country til this past Monday and am behind on doing everything not only to prepare it for winter living but also to prepare for power outages here when the trees fall on power lines. I have so many questions. I am just learning the basics and then think Iím doing ok and then something else comes up. Living in it in the summer was a learning process and now the winter living is going to be a chore to learn as well. Are there classes to take somewhere or a helpful one over the world on YouTube of what I need to do to prepare for winter conditions? Thereís so much I donít know. Any suggestions for what to do for winter as well as where to look for knowledge on everything airstream living would be much appreciated. New to the forum. Looks like Iíve got my work cut out for me. Thanks. Feeling overwhelmed!!! To say the least. Also suggestions on how to survive power outages and still have heat and water would be much appreciated.
__________________

sstanley1975 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2018, 01:01 PM   #2
Rivet Master
 
Lily&Me's Avatar

 
2006 22' Interstate
Normal , Illinois
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 14,726
You will find lots of helpful information in the Winter Living subforum here...

http://www.airforums.com/forums/f462/

Perhaps make yourself some hot tea, and do some reading.

We were all new once, but sounds like youíre having a bit of baptism by fire.

You will survive, and spring will come again.

Good luck,

Maggie
__________________

__________________
🏡 🚐 Cherish and appreciate those you love. This moment could be your last.🌹🐚
Lily&Me is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2018, 01:40 PM   #3
CLOUDSPLITTER "Tahawus"
 
ROBERT CROSS's Avatar

 
2003 25' Classic
Zanadude Nebula , Milky Way
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 12,540
Images: 1
Welcome Aboard!! 👍

First...if you don't already have, get a generator.

A proper sized unit could run the heating system thru any cold spell situations.
And a LP converted generator with a residential tank would provide enough run time.

Good Luck...get some onesies. 😂

Bob
🇺🇸
__________________
ďNot enjoying the Network News Broadcast?Öask your Doctor." 🤪
RLC


"The hardest thing about Airstreaming, clearing your head and accepting how others feel itís supposed to be done"Ö..
Amanamus


"Tahawus"
ROBERT CROSS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2018, 01:52 PM   #4
Rivet Master
 
gypsydad's Avatar

 
2017 28' Flying Cloud
2014 25' FB Flying Cloud
2008 25' Safari FB SE
Austin (winter) Lincoln MT (summer) , Texas & Montana
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,902
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstanley1975 View Post
I am a single woman living in my 34 foot airstream classic and just bought it in July this year. I am living in the mountains in southwest Virginia and we just had our first winter ice storm and I was without power for five days. I had not really prepared the airstream for winter and still haven’t as I was gone out of country til this past Monday and am behind on doing everything not only to prepare it for winter living but also to prepare for power outages here when the trees fall on power lines. I have so many questions. I am just learning the basics and then think I’m doing ok and then something else comes up. Living in it in the summer was a learning process and now the winter living is going to be a chore to learn as well. Are there classes to take somewhere or a helpful one over the world on YouTube of what I need to do to prepare for winter conditions? There’s so much I don’t know. Any suggestions for what to do for winter as well as where to look for knowledge on everything airstream living would be much appreciated. New to the forum. Looks like I’ve got my work cut out for me. Thanks. Feeling overwhelmed!!! To say the least. Also suggestions on how to survive power outages and still have heat and water would be much appreciated.
Your a braver person then I, to take this on with freezing on a regular basis during winter! Many folks will post stories and advise on how to live in your AS here on the Forum and elsewhere, but many others will confirm that the AS is not a 4 season trailer and there are lots of considerations, especially when freeze comes; let alone power outages. We leave ours plugged in while in the outskirts of Austin, but we leave the propane on with thermostat set to 40 so nothing freezes...we have froze pipes and valves when we didn't few years back. I use one tank at a time, so I know when it is out, but I do check the tanks every other day to make sure the tank selected is fairly full. Electric heaters can help to keep you warm, but the furnace in the AS blows hot air in the belly so your pipes get some heated air to help keep from freezing; the electric heat from portable heater, typically will not reach that area so be aware. Other issue with the AS is the condensation on the windows and inside walls, which will build up inside due to thin walls. Some folks line the windows with aluminum insulation, but I think a dehumidifier is a better overall solution if your running heat most of the time in really cold temps...remember, with moisture comes additional problems if not taken care of; you don't want moisture problems including rot or even black mold perhaps..not trying to scare you, just a fact it can/does happen. You want to keep it as dry as possible inside.

Biggest concerns are your (1) electrical inconsistency and (2)making sure you have propane available. I would consider a larger propane tank source to draw from over the winter if your not traveling in your AS...rent one perhaps from your local propane suppliers. Good luck and stay warm!
__________________
Empty Nesters; Gypsies on the road!
2017 28' Twin Flying Cloud
2017 F250 King Ranch, 4X4, Blue-Ox WDH
Summer in Lincoln, MT- Winter in Austin, TX
gypsydad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2018, 02:01 PM   #5
Slide Out Society #001
 
GCinSC2's Avatar
 
2007 30' Classic S/O
Somewhere , South Carolina
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 2,623
Greetings and welcome and a special hello to a Slide Out owner. Post your questions and hang on.

Also here's a group of like minded Slide Out owners http://www.airforums.com/forums/f366...ry-159166.html
The Slide Out Society.

And an invitation to Alumaslider II next Oct details here http://www.airforums.com/forums/f288...-a-188183.html

Gary
__________________
S/OS #001
2005 Dodge Ram 2500 5.9L 6 Speed
16" Michelins, Hi Spec Wheels, Max Brake, Carslile Actuator, Equal-i-zer, Dill TPMS. Campfire cook.
GCinSC2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2018, 02:49 PM   #6
Rivet Master
 
Currently Looking...
Sioux Falls , South Dakota
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 905
Welcome to the forum. Reading and asking questions here, especially in the Full-timing and Winter living sections, is a good start.


Are you stuck in Virginia because of the weather or for other reasons? If you are stuck because of the weather, you can move soon. Many of us try to avoid freezing temperatures, but sometimes we're stuck with them for a bit. As long as your furnace has a duct to your water tanks (fresh, grey, and black) AND a return to the furnace you should be good. That return is important. It can be as simple as a screened opening to the main part of the trailer or a separate duct. The point is to provide air flow in the tank area.


If your Airstream is going to be a tiny house, permanently parked there, you will need to provide insulation around the perimeter. Some people use hay or straw bales for that, and the mice love them. The mice are protected from owls, hawks, and rain/snow so that they can safely work on finding a path to inside your trailer.


A better solution is to get some foam insulation boards, at least 2" thick, and cut pieces to fit tightly from the ground up to the sides of the trailer. You will also need a bunch of concrete blocks. Cut a length of foam and stand it up against the trailer. Put two blocks under the trailer, right up against the foam and two more on the outside. Continue around the trailer, fitting each piece of foam tightly up against the previous one. When you get to the corners you will find that the Airstream's curved design becomes a liability. You will have to somehow figure out how to get the foam up tight against the trailer. One way is to make square corners, then fit a piece between the two upright foam pieces and the trailer. Be sure to leave some sort of access for filling and dumping. When you have finished with the foam and blocks, tape some heavy construction plastic to the trailer and over the foam. You will probably have to tape the seams as well. The whole idea is to keep wind out from under the trailer.


You will want a generator that, at a minimum, can power your furnace and refrigerator. If you have turned your Airstream into a tiny house, though, you may as well get one large enough to power the whole thing. It won't cost much more to buy, but it will be heavier and use more fuel. DO NOT EVER run a generator in a closed space. At a minimum it will quit working due to a lack of oxygen. Worst case YOU will quit working due to a lack of oxygen.
__________________
David Lininger, kb0zke
TAC SD-6
AIR 54240
Heartland mpg 181 (sold)
1993 Foretravel U300 (for sale)
kb0zke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-18-2018, 04:42 PM   #7
Rivet Master
 
2017 28' International
Baileys Harbor , Wisconsin
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 514
Blog Entries: 1
1. Get a dehumidifier, run bath fans when condensation on windows.
2. Get a generator (as mentioned above) for emergencies and make sure you have enough fuel for it to run at least a week.
3. Put skirting around if possible to minimize cold air underneath.
4. Get an LP tank gauge and buy an extra tank to keep filled for emergency purposes.
5. Get a heated water hose. That way you can have water and not unhook it when it falls below freezing.
6. Might want to get a small electric heater for inside.
7. Minimize cooking and showering during cold spells since it add condensation to the interior.
Daquenzer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2018, 08:58 AM   #8
Rivet Master
 
Hittenstiehl's Avatar
 
1962 28' Ambassador
1961 19' Globetrotter
Mesa , Arizona
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 3,628
Images: 9
The nice thing is you found the correct form to give you good advice and they are already answering you.

Most all the information you need is here you can sift through and find it or you can ask you questions intermittently and people will answer them. You might also reach out to some Airstream groups that are local to you and see if somebody lives nearby that may come by for meet and greet to explain some of these things in further detail.

Look up WBCCI and look for the group that is closest to your geographical location. Email that group and see if anybody lives near or around you that might be willing to correspond with you. Airstreamers are a very friendly bunch who are always eager to help.
__________________

Hittenstiehl
Hittenstiehl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2018, 11:02 AM   #9
Half a Rivet Short
 
2017 30' Classic
Carlisle , Pennsylvania
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 6,141
Hi

As you can see, the answers cover a wide range of possible situations. Some people are "tiny house" oriented in a fixed location. Others move around on a regular basis. That alone can change the "what do you do?" part of it a *lot*. The ideas that work with one may not be the best advice for the other. More information about what your plans are could help focus things a bit.

One thing that has not been mentioned is snow. We're a bit north of you, but we've already had close to a foot of snow. You certainly are in an area that could get a bit of ice and snow at some point. If you are parked under a bunch of trees, ice / snow loaded limbs falling hitting your roof are not a good thing ....

Given your location, once things are back in season, a visit to the local Airstream park (Highland Haven) would be one way to meet a lot of other people with similar trailers. They also have a number of rallies there. It's not a long drive from Floyd .... Last time I was there I learned how to rivet parts back onto my trailer in a thunderstorm .... after that it was back to Floyd to re-stock on beer

Bob
uncle_bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2018, 12:37 PM   #10
4 Rivet Member
 
Currently Looking...
Currently Looking...
Box Elder (formerly of Center Moriches, NY) , South Dakota
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 288
Welcome sstanley1975! If this is your first RV, you've certainly jumped into the DEEP end of the pool. As you're discovering, there IS a LOT to learn. One of the BEST ways to quickly learn about the RV lifestyle is to attend an RV Boot Camp. At RVBC, all the systems found on a modern RV will be explained and demystified. The Escapees RV Club run an EXCELLENT RVBC, usually over a weekend. Other groups also offer their own version of RVBC, some as long as eight days (more socializing). RVSEF, FMCA, RV~Dreams quickly come to mind. Mark & Dawn Polk of www.RVEducation101.com have a DVD series that contains a wealth of information. I was able to borrow some DVDs from my local library. I bought other DVDs I was interested in. RVBC graduates are safer RVers and, smarter RV buyers. Mistakes made with RV are often expensive and, sometimes dangerous. Chuck Woodbury's EXCELLENT www.RVTravel.com free website (donations appreciated) just started a new segment targeted at RV "newbies". Chuck is one of the few voices in the RV industry who publicizes the shameful conditions that FAR too many RVs are delivered in. Buyers of these poorly made RVs often get a run around getting bounced between the RV dealer and the RV builder as to WHO is responsible for repairs. You'll find this forum has many Airstream owners who are VERY knowledgable and, they are VERY generous in sharing that knowledge. A 30' Airstream is going to need a SUBSTANTIAL tow vehicle (a topic well covered in RVBC). If you have NOT yet checked the date code on all the tires, that would be a good place to start. Suspension, brakes, bearings (ie:"running gear") should be checked BEFORE you start on tour travels. When you think you ARE ready to travel, start SMALL. You can "camp" for an entire week/weekend in your driveway/yard. Next, try a campground that's only an hour or three away. Keep a DETAILED list of what you forgot to bring (or had trouble with). As you gain experience, that list will shrink as you gain experience. You CAN do this as a solo female and, you will find many other solo females in your travels. There are solo female RVing groups (RVing Women come to mind; there are others). If you need help in learning to tow your 30' "bullet" there ARE RV Driving Schools (a service frequently offered at larger RV rallies). An hour or two with a professional instructor can really boost your confidence and capabilities. Those larger rallies often have a "Smart Weigh" service available. Once you've had your rig Smart Weighed, you'll KNOW what tire pressure is needed for YOUR set up. Unless you make MAJOR changes, Smart Weigh is a one time expense (but an expense that WELL worth its' cost). Again, WELCOME!
Regards, John
NY24 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2018, 03:54 PM   #11
2 Rivet Member
 
2016 25' Flying Cloud
Friday Harbor , Washington
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 59
Another live in.

Yes, you see how helpful this site is. I commend them all.
This is my third winter living in a new 25 FC in a mild winter climate -- so far -- on an island in Washington in view of Canada. The temperature might get to about 25 degrees 3-4 times a winter. Thus, you know your circumstance is more difficult. My heat is the furnace, off or on 2-3 times a day, for a 5 minute top up as necessary, on top of two low heat electric heaters; one on 24/7 next to the toilet. For two weeks now I am delighted having a oil-radiator heater under the dining table on low. For the first time this winter adding skirts nearly all around. I am hooked into a daughter-owned, woodland home for utilities, letting the water hose freeze for a day or so using water in containers in the kitchen. A generator seems a great idea; my backup heat, if ever necessary, will come from outside charcoal stove or two positioned under, and a dozen candles inside. I enjoy cold so have several windows cracked for ventilation. It is an adventure. Welcome.
Rob Cope is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2018, 07:29 PM   #12
1 Rivet Member
 
2009 30' Classic
a city in west GA , Georgia
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 14
We are living in our trailer this winter also. I skirted my bottom with foam board insulation sheet s we went from 23 one morning outside with the under side of trailer was 58 with my Wi-Fi thermometer read. 33 hours later the air temp out side was 60 and sunny. Big sweat down under trailer. So I cut 6 holes in my insulation sheets to breath the trailer and dry this out. And cut additional sheets to patch over the holes when it goes back cold again. Here in a few weeks. Moisture ='s mold. Keep air flowing when we can. Good luck on your winterize. I will hold patches up with cinder blocks.when we drop back under freezing
Joyman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2018, 07:59 PM   #13
New Member
 
2006 34' Classic S/O
Floyd , Virginia
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 4
Thank you so much all of you! Lots of great suggestions. I am going to get a generator at Loweís and an extra propane tank to keep full and a dehumidifier. For starters. I am going to skirt the bottom of the trailer once I figure out if I am staying here for the winter or going to be near my daughter in Kentucky and also going to look into the boot camps and the DVDís as well as the groups of women who rv and read the forums. Since I am tiny house living and do not have another home, got to make this work. Again thank you so much! The onesies are a great idea! Haha! I think I have a lot of learning to do and also a great deal of reading! I donít have my own tow vehicle just rent from enterprise whenever I have to move the trailer but for now, itís staying warm and keeping the pipes from freezing.
sstanley1975 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2018, 08:51 PM   #14
Rivet Master
 
A W Warn's Avatar

 
2000 25' Safari
1999 34' Excella
Davidson County, NC , Highlands County, FL
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 3,330
Your choice of generator is important, for multiple reasons.

1000 watt will keep the batteries charged - 2000 watt will run a small appliance while charging batteries - 3500 watt & up will run the air conditioner, run a small appliance, and charge. (there are modifications to the AC that will allow using a smaller generator)

A pure sine wave inverter generator is best for the equipment in your trailer that has sensitive electronics, like circuit boards, etc. (refrigerator, furnace, air conditioner, television, etc).
A construction type generator might harm this type of equipment, because of its harsh wave form.

When you use a generator you want it to be quiet as possible, so neighbors do not complain and if needed you can sleep while it runs.

There are expensive and less expensive. (Honda, Yamaha $$$, … Champion, Predator, and other less $ with similar results)
And you can choose fuel type, gasoline or propane, or a combination dual fuel.

Depending on which generator you choose, you will need the appropriate adapter to plug into the generator that will connect to the trailer's power cord.
__________________

__________________
Alan
2014 Silverado 1500 Crew Cab 5.3L maximum trailering package (yes, I'm towing the 34')
A W Warn is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
OMG, Shocks again bmklawt Shocks 1 05-09-2010 02:29 AM
OMG!!! They're all yellow! AIR-Quarius The Pet Forum 8 04-15-2009 11:04 PM
OMG - I've got water!!! wannaroam General Repair Forum 9 08-18-2008 12:13 PM
OMG someone please save these poor Birds SaabLover Off Topic Forum 7 05-31-2008 08:30 PM
OMG!! Getting 2nd dog - can't wait!! Mackhopp The Pet Forum 43 04-24-2008 07:22 PM


Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by the Airstream, Inc. or any of its affiliates. Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:53 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.