Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 02-15-2019, 05:18 PM   #21
Rivet Master
 
KJRitchie's Avatar
 
2008 25' Classic
Full Time , Texas
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,310
We started our full time journey in October 2017. We headed west and camped at these national parks in 2017 and 2018:
Guadalupe Mt
South Rim Grand Canyon
Zion
Death Valley
Joshua Tree
Capitol Reef
Arches
Canyonlands Needle District
Great Basin
My Rainier
North Cascades
Glacier
Colorado National Mounument
Black Canyon of the Gunnison

We had also planned Crater Lake and Lassen but too much wildfire smoke so we are going to hit those this year plus Mesa Verde. It’s possible we may hit Grand Teton in September.

Kelvin
__________________

__________________
2008 Classic 25fb "Silver Mistress"
2015 Ram 2500 6.7L Cummins. Crew Cab, 4x4, Silver
KJRitchie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2019, 05:30 PM   #22
Rivet Master
 
dznf0g's Avatar
 
2007 30' Classic
Oswego , Illinois
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 10,344
Images: 5
I think your $100/day estimate is a bit low. Our actual expenses are between $125 - $150 per day depending upon fuel costs and distances traveled on the particular trip. That's with 90% public campgrounds. Private campgrounds are typically 50 - 100% higher on average.
__________________

__________________
-Rich-

"If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy." - Red Green
dznf0g is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2019, 05:42 PM   #23
1 Rivet Member
 
Universal City , Arkansas
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 19
We just started with our 22fb Bambi and have visited several National Parks including Joshua Tree during the shutdown. Fantastic experience and recommend it but if your AS is over 25 ft you'll need to stay outside the park. Recommend Big Bend but they have limited access to larger RV sites. Get the senior pass, worth every penny. Good traveling!
Barnyard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2019, 11:57 PM   #24
Retired paddler
 
4mer Paddler's Avatar
 
1993 29' Excella
Brighton , Ontario
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by skyguyscott View Post
So been dreaming some day when I fully retire to go visit all the national parks I can reach via Airstream. Is a budget of $3000/month to cover all expenses a good planning target?
Having seen more of Canada than most Canadians, and having been introduced to the U.S.A. via Alaska, we figured it was time to see the “lower 50”. For your info and reference, here are the costs we rang up over 4 months.
We left home December 20, 2017 and returned April 16, 2018, avoiding most of a Canadian winter. We started by heading to Florida and staying for a month, then headed West across the lower states to California, then returning via a route slightly higher back home. The TT logged 9,228 miles while the TV did 20,551 (due to a lot of sightseeing on 4 wheels)

Fuel. 4,315.00
Tolls/ferries 462.00
Camp fees. 3,401.00
Hotels. 1,191.00
Eating out. 2,335.00
Groceries. 3,151.00
Beer/wine. 835.00
Repairs to TT & TV. 2,685.00

After the month in Florida we didn’t spend much time in any one place and so didn’t avail ourselves of many cost-saving opportunities for lengthier stays. Hotel costs were incurred due to travelling with the TT still winterized at the beginning of the trip and an extended stay while repairs were being made to the TT.

Hope you get sone use from this. Safe travels.
Hans
__________________
Cathy and Hans
1993 Excella 29' w/Hensley
2011 GMC SIerra 2500HD SLT
4mer Paddler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2019, 07:08 AM   #25
4 Rivet Member
 
2015 30' International
FREDERICK , Maryland
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 325
A lofty goal definitely worth pursuing. Over the years (I am 62 now), I have been to all of the big name national parks/monuments and many of the smaller ones. Though they are fantastic, don't limit yourself to only National Parks. There are MANY equally fantastic state parks, national forests, BLM areas that are a must see. Often I have found that state parks often have better camping facilities than the national parks (FHU) and these areas are often less crowded than the national ones.
By the way - "There are currently 418 official National Park Service units in the United States, the District of Columbia, and US Territories as of January 2019."
https://everything-everywhere.com/na...united-states/
I have been to at least 120 of this list.
Doc Foster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2019, 07:58 AM   #26
Rivet Master
 
1988 25' Excella
1987 32' Excella
Knoxville , Tennessee
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 3,151
Blog Entries: 1
You have a good plan, Go for it.

For us, $6000 a month is closer. Camping fees in the more traveled areas have gone up markedly in the last several years. We used to stay more at the forest service sites for $5 to $11 a night and that is fun. But, if you are traveling from one point to another you may use more fuel getting to them than you save in fees. And if you are doing an extended stay you have to balance the fuel for the truck against paying more to get closer.
In any even, camping fees and fuel are the big drivers in cost for us. But you can anticipate. plan, and control those costs if you need to. With diesel fuel varying between $3 and $5 a gallon it is awful easy to run up $75 to $100 days moving or sight seeing. But that is something the 2 of us can do together and we like it.
Bill M. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2019, 08:31 AM   #27
Rivet Master
 
A W Warn's Avatar

 
2000 25' Safari
1999 34' Excella
Davidson County , North Carolina
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 3,958
Quote:
Originally Posted by skyguyscott View Post
So been dreaming some day when I fully retire to go visit all the national parks I can reach via Airstream, (maybe even the ones in Alaska!) and it occurred to me that some fellow AS folk might have done just that.

So, I realize everyone's experience will be different, and your milage may vary, and all that, but a few basic questions:

Say I want to spend a week or three at each park (assuming the park will let me do that?), is that enough time to see and do everything worth doing at the parks? There are currently 60 parks (not including all the monuments, etc.) so this will take a few years to accomplish! Is a budget of $3000/month to cover all expenses a good planning target?
All of the same cost of living at home continues (eating/drinking/meals, clothing, utilities, insurances, taxes, rent, mortgage etc...). Utilities at home might lower a bit, but not that much. Food might cost a little more if you choose to eat out more (that what I find we do for convenience).

Maybe a better question might be: how much additional cost is there when traveling and camping?

Fuel, vehicle maintenance, entry fees, campsite rental are the additional costs. For extended traveling, cross country/national parks/traveling every 2 to 3 days, we spend less than $150 per day extra traveling (maybe close to $100-$125 average). For extended staying in one spot, renting a monthly site, wintering in Florida 5-6 months, we spend less than $50 per day extra.

Some budget for vehicle repairs along the way is necessary, but I have not had that issue other than a flat tire.
__________________
Alan
2014 Silverado 1500 Crew Cab 5.3L maximum trailering package
A W Warn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2019, 01:10 PM   #28
PKI
Rivet Master
 
PKI's Avatar
 
2015 23' FB Flying Cloud
Walnut Creek , California
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 3,668
Gee, kind of sounds like the way to save the budget is with a coach that is easy to tow (maybe an older & lighter weight unit) with a TV that gets good MPG on regular gas and even better MPG solo. Sounds like cooking all your own meals efficiently is a good idea. Seems like a simple home base that incurs very little overhead is a real help to managing a limited budget.

How about the option of hosting at a number of National Parks, say a different one each year with other carefully planned ecconomic NP/M/COE visits to fill out the rest of the year? Pat
PKI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-2019, 07:23 PM   #29
4 Rivet Member
 
1969 18' Caravel
Greenville , whereEverIroam
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 468
Images: 5
Yes, I currently own a 69 Caravel, which is 18 feet and under 3000' empty, so mileage, maneuverability, and so on should be good. I'm sure some things might break along the way here and there, but more likely on the TV than the trailer at this point. By the time I get to retirement and do the whole trek, I may have changed trailers, but don't see why I couldn't do it with this one, it's been good to me for the last 15 years or so.

Cooking rather than eating out would be my typical meal -- it's fun to camp cook, and even more fun when you share those meals with fellow campers you get to know. Eating out would normally be done on the road in between parks.

If I do around 20 parks a year, it would still take nearly 3 years to see all the ones reachable by car. And I would want to do some other NPS sites like the monuments too, eventually...most likely hitting the ones that are in between the parks and on the way on this same trek. Not a bad way to spend the first few years of retirement, if we're so lucky I think.
skyguyscott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2019, 09:50 AM   #30
Rivet Master
 
2017 30' Classic
Anna Maria , Florida
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,378
Quote:
Originally Posted by skyguyscott View Post
Yes, I currently own a 69 Caravel, which is 18 feet and under 3000' empty, so mileage, maneuverability, and so on should be good. I'm sure some things might break along the way here and there, but more likely on the TV than the trailer at this point. By the time I get to retirement and do the whole trek, I may have changed trailers, but don't see why I couldn't do it with this one, it's been good to me for the last 15 years or so.

Cooking rather than eating out would be my typical meal -- it's fun to camp cook, and even more fun when you share those meals with fellow campers you get to know. Eating out would normally be done on the road in between parks.

If I do around 20 parks a year, it would still take nearly 3 years to see all the ones reachable by car. And I would want to do some other NPS sites like the monuments too, eventually...most likely hitting the ones that are in between the parks and on the way on this same trek. Not a bad way to spend the first few years of retirement, if we're so lucky I think.
I can't imagine not getting bored to tears with being on the road and campgrounds 24/7/365 .
The most I can handle is 8 weeks.
It brings back memories living in various refugee camps for two and a half years in my teenage years.
franklyfrank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2019, 03:36 PM   #31
4 Rivet Member
 
1969 18' Caravel
Greenville , whereEverIroam
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 468
Images: 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by franklyfrank View Post
I can't imagine not getting bored to tears with being on the road and campgrounds 24/7/365 .
The most I can handle is 8 weeks.
It brings back memories living in various refugee camps for two and a half years in my teenage years.
Frank,

So sorry you had to endure refugee camps, hope the homes you found were warm, welcoming, generous and joyous.

It's funny how different people get board; for me, once I hit retirement, sitting around at home day after day would drive me crazy -- crazy enough to hit the road with my AS in tow and at least once before I die, see the Grand Canyon lit with the golden fire of sunset, hear the way the wind whistles as it rustles through the towering Sequoias, and maybe smell the salty cool air from the rocky coast of Maine on an early morning sun rise over the misty Atlantic.

When we are stuck in the house, we often pine for the adventure of travel, but when out and away, long for the familiar comforts of home! I am reminded of a favorite movie quote from an obscure cult classic I love, "Hey, hey, hey...don't be mean. We don't have to be mean, 'cause remember, no matter where you go, there you are."
skyguyscott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-2019, 08:45 PM   #32
PKI
Rivet Master
 
PKI's Avatar
 
2015 23' FB Flying Cloud
Walnut Creek , California
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 3,668
Interesting perspective.

We are starting to find that the mass of people at National Parks make those areas less than desirable.

However, the residential areas on the coast of Maine above the NP were interesting and engaging while being quiet and relaxing to explore.

The drive into the North Rim of the GC was spectacular, while the parking lot was a barrier to be negotiated.

The clog of bear jams and photo seeking tourists in Yellowstone were dangerous, but the drive over the Beartooth Pass was so spectacular and memorable that we have repeated the trip.

So, it's not just the NP/Ms that are to be experienced, but also the land and adventures that lead to and link those very famouse places.

By the way, did you know there are National and Provintial parks in Canada too? Pat
PKI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2019, 09:11 AM   #33
4 Rivet Member
 
1969 18' Caravel
Greenville , whereEverIroam
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 468
Images: 5
Yes, we love our parks so much we are loving them to death. I am thinking of hitting the most popular ones in the off season, whenever that is, for that very reason.

I do love Canada. Only been to Toronto so far, but what a nice city! Canadians are so nice. I dated a Canadian from Windsor for a while back in college, and learned so much. Sometimes I think we would do well if we were more like Canada, but then there is that funny thing they have about the Queen....
skyguyscott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2019, 10:00 AM   #34
PKI
Rivet Master
 
PKI's Avatar
 
2015 23' FB Flying Cloud
Walnut Creek , California
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 3,668
The off season will vary a bit. When we went to Yellowstone in early September, the regulars told us that there were many more visitors in the park after labor day that year. The general assumption was that the higher rate was caused by the fires that locked folks out of several other parks.

When we visited Glacier last year, we didn't. The fire on the West side closed the Going to the Sun road and that was the reason we wanted to return.

When we attempted to make a quick visit to Estes, there was an event in process that jammed the area. Wall to wall people and cars. We escaped to Kansas and started all over.

So, yes! Visit in off season. In any season, book the major parks six to nine months early and deal with the crowd by exploring early in the day and avoid the day tourist groups. We found a late afternoon/early evening tour sometimes gets you more access.

If your visit is not timely, adjust to an alternate. We were able to dry camp in Colter Bay. Not our preference, but workable for access to GT and YS. We could have done GTSR from East Glacier to the sumit, but our schedule was tight and we had to move on. Flexibility really adds to your rate of success.

Make your plan. Plan alternates. And chase those smiles. Pat
PKI is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-2019, 10:05 AM   #35
Site Team
 
azflycaster's Avatar
 
2002 25' Safari
Dewey , Arizona
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 13,178
Images: 62
Blog Entries: 1
In general the parks are less crowded in the off season, but many of the facilities are closed as well. We visited Yellowstone last September and many of the campgrounds were closed or closing. Reservations are a must, IMO.
__________________

Richard

Wally Byam Airstream Club 7513
azflycaster is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2019, 10:35 AM   #36
New Member
 
Kalispell , Montana
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 2
This sounds like a dream trip! I live in Montana next to Glacier National Park and can tell you that a week is not enough there, and you will definitely need to plan ahead for lodging because it fills up almost a year in advance. There are also good KOAs and other campgrounds outside the park, but they also get very busy in summer. July is by far the best time to visit because the snow will be off the high elevation Logan Pass on the Going to the Sun Road, which is a MUST for the Park, and in August there’s a high probability of wildfires producing smoke that ruins views and closes areas. You can’t pull trailers on the Going to the Sun Road, but you can go around the East side to get to St Mary and Many Glacier. I think the State Parks in Montana have a limit of 25 feet for trailer length, but they’re great options for camping along the way too. Check out Flathead Lake if you have time. Have a fantastic AS road trip!
WildMontana is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2019, 10:54 AM   #37
New Member
 
2007 25' International CCD FB
Los Angeles , California
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 4
Interested in taking the ferries?

If you have ample time, and the west coast is on your agenda, consider making it up to Vancouver and then over to Vancouver Island. You can ferry up the the Canadian coast right up to Alaska. It’s spectacular no matter how far north you get.
Happy trails, CrystalLady
Crystallady1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2019, 01:09 PM   #38
Rivet Master
 
Hittenstiehl's Avatar
 
1962 28' Ambassador
1961 19' Globetrotter
Mesa , Arizona
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 4,098
Images: 9
Skyguy,

Your trip sounds doable and exciting something we endeavor to pursue in a couple of years.

if you're not familiar with it you might be interested to look at a website called

The Greatest American Road Trip

It highlights the 2016 (sponsered) Airstream road trip that photographer Jonathan Irish and Stephanie Payne took through all of the National Parks in celebration of the 100th Anniversary. They made a hardcover pictorial book out of the result and it's beautiful and the website is equally stunning with all their gorgeous photographs and park descriptions.
__________________

Hittenstiehl
Hittenstiehl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2019, 03:13 PM   #39
59' Globester
 
twolanehwy's Avatar
 
1959 18' "Footer"
1957 26' Overlander
Three Rivers , California
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 232
Quote:
Originally Posted by rowiebowie View Post
Age 62, and I'll rub it in a bit and say I got one of the last $10 lifetime passes.
https://www.nps.gov/planyourvisit/se...ss-changes.htm
.
Yeah, missed it by that much....as Maxwell Smart would say.
4 mos. but $80 not bad for the rest of your life...unless you lose it.
Even if you have receipt still gotta re-purchase.
twolanehwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-2019, 05:09 PM   #40
Rivet Master
 
Mollysdad's Avatar
 
2017 26' Flying Cloud
Tampa , Florida
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 3,914
The Airstream YouTube couple "Less Junk, More Journey" kept a log of all their Alaska expenses, and compared it to traveling in the lower 48. Just seeing their costs makes watching worth the time.


Some things were more expensive in Alaska, but then campsites are more available for boon docking.
__________________

Mollysdad is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Let's Create Our Dream RV Park Fly at Night On The Road... 57 06-27-2016 08:39 AM
Costs A Bunch? Janets Husband Off Topic Forum 22 07-04-2004 10:00 AM
General Repair costs for my 78 Excella startrekker2001 Dollars & Cents 1 11-08-2003 09:50 PM
Shipping Costs for my Rock Guard tmeagle1 Rock Guards, Segment & Window Protectors 7 02-27-2003 11:16 AM


Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by the Airstream, Inc. or any of its affiliates. Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.



Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:27 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×