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Old 10-28-2013, 06:04 AM   #1
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1991 29' Excella
Rockwood , Ontario
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Winterizing - oiling outside metal parts

As a new owner of an older Airstream, and this is the first time I am winterizing her, has anyone been told to oil outside metal parts? I mean the bumper, box at front of hitch, etc. What oil should I use and what is the easiest way to do this? Also, should I cover up the electrical plug in's for the hitch, or do something to protect them from the winter snow and cold?
Thanks so much!
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Old 10-28-2013, 06:34 AM   #2
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1993 21' Sovereign
Colfax , North Carolina
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I've never heard of oiling things like that. You can lube moving parts, like door hinges and the coupler. As for the electrical plugs, you can put some white lithium grease on the umbilical plug, and make sure the 30 amp plug is out of the weather.
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Old 10-28-2013, 07:09 AM   #3
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If you're worried about water intrusion into moving parts (which can lead to icing), then WD40 is the answer. Spray some into your door locks, for example, then work the key in and out a few times to ensure all parts are coated.

Otherwise, the best low-temperature lubrication is graphite. Teflon spray is also good for low-temp lubrication, but make sure you get a dry-film Teflon spray that doesn't contain silicone. It will look like a white powder when sprayed.

Non-moving parts need no lubrication at all, so limit your lubrication activities to hinges, your jack crank handles, etc. that have moving parts.

For the electrical connections on the trailer tongue, dielectric grease works to keep water out. It's non-conductive, but when you plug in your umbilical again, the friction on the contacts will scrape off the grease from the contact points so it won't interfere with your electrical connections.
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Old 10-28-2013, 07:51 AM   #4
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1977 31' Sovereign
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Marine dealers sell spray cans of corrosion inhibiting grease or wax based coatings. CRC was one of the best in my Florida testing, when I was at OMC.
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