Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-19-2005, 10:13 AM   #1
3 Rivet Member
 
1972 29' Ambassador
1968 22' Safari
Tyler , Texas
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 116
What about seaside salt air?

For those of you who park your Airstreams at the seaside for long periods: does the salt air (that stuff that gives the air the "tang" we all love) pose a problem for the exterior?
__________________

__________________
26.982 amu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2005, 10:47 AM   #2
Rivet Master
 
RichardT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 925
No worries about the exterior (boats are made of aluminum and sit in salt water)
But you should worry about the frame rusting.
Keep the tounge and exposed frame painted and look for signs of problems inside of the belly pan as frames can rust away if not taken care of.
__________________

__________________
RichardT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2005, 11:39 AM   #3
Airstreamin and luvin it
Commercial Member
 
Devoman's Avatar

 
2005 25' Safari
Northwest Panhandle , The Sunshine State/WBCCI 6637
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 1,524
Images: 2
Salt

I live on the beach and have my Airstream out here parked as well.The best solution I have come up with over the years living out here is to wash it down with water at least once a week or every so many days.You tend to have to do with everything such as cars,windows on house,Plants,lawn furniture,etc,etc,I do it to be safer than sorry in the future.salt build always leaves this nasty film on everything that it can touch.
__________________
CHANGE IS GOOD.LIFE IS GREAT!
It just cant get any better than that.


Devoman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2005, 08:15 PM   #4
Rivet Master
 
Tinsel Loaf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 790
Salt is aggressive on all metals, it brings out the worst in them. A scratch to the aluminum will oxidize and creep under the new coating giving it a powdery edge that gets worse with age. Walberize a lot paying special attention to scratches will reduce the oxidize creep.
__________________
Tinsel Loaf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2005, 08:33 PM   #5
Moderator
 
jcanavera's Avatar

 
2004 30' Classic Slideout
Fenton , Missouri
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 9,002
Images: 143
Send a message via AIM to jcanavera Send a message via Skype™ to jcanavera
While I haven't done any beachfront camping with the A/S, I do remember some trips to Myrtle Beach and to St. Augustine. In each case I stayed 7-9 days. I remember a glistening on my trailers which in effect was the salt that was in the air coming off the ocean. My advice is also frequent washing and keeping the trailer Walbernized.

Jack
__________________
Jack Canavera
STL Mo.
AIR #56
'04 Classic 30' S.O.,'03 GMC Savana 2500,'14 Honda CTX 700
jcanavera is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2005, 08:38 PM   #6
Naysayer
 
Boondocker's Avatar

 
1968 24' Tradewind
Louisville , earth
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,635
Images: 7
Send a message via Yahoo to Boondocker
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcanavera
While I haven't done any beachfront camping with the A/S, I do remember some trips to Myrtle Beach and to St. Augustine. In each case I stayed 7-9 days. I remember a glistening on my trailers which in effect was the salt that was in the air coming off the ocean. My advice is also frequent washing and keeping the trailer Walbernized.

Jack
Good thing I am not afraid to look like an idiot , so here we go... do I understand correctly that walbernizer is a wash/protectant and not a compounding product? If so is there any merit in using it on my as yet un polished coach? I am still a little confused on this getting buffed process....
__________________
Rodney

Visit my photography page
and the
Favorite camp grounds project map
My Blog

(The artist formerly known as General Disarray)

Boondocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2005, 09:07 PM   #7
Rivet Monster
 
wahoonc's Avatar

 
1975 31' Sovereign
1980 31' Excella II
Sprung Leak , North Carolina
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 7,174
Images: 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gen Disarray
Good thing I am not afraid to look like an idiot , so here we go... do I understand correctly that walbernizer is a wash/protectant and not a compounding product? If so is there any merit in using it on my as yet un polished coach? I am still a little confused on this getting buffed process....
I are a charter member of IA (idiots anonymous ) Walbernize is a protectorant...I have never seen the ingredient list so I have no clue as to what the active ingredients could be ie; carnuba, beeswax, silicone, etc. IMHO I would not want to waste my time or money on applying something that I am going to have to strip off in the near future. FWIW my Clearcoat looks like crap, but other than a very occasional wash that is all it is going to get until I decide to STRIP and then paint, polish or clearcoat.


Aaron
__________________
....so many Airstreams....so little time...
WBCCI #XXXX AIR #2495
Why are we in this basket...and where are we going
wahoonc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2005, 11:11 PM   #8
Rivet Master
 
1977 31' Sovereign
1963 26' Overlander
1989 34' Excella
Johnsburg , Illinois
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,941
Salt Air vs Airstreams

Airstreams are not ALL aluminum. In fact the salt air can cause a battery effect if there are other metals touching the aluminum. They call it galvanic corrosion. Contact with glavanized metals to aluminum will also cause the galvanized coating to erode much faster and then there is rusting of the underlying steel. The pictures are from an Airstream that spent time on the Maryland sea shore.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	P1010011__Small_.JPG
Views:	143
Size:	44.2 KB
ID:	17178   Click image for larger version

Name:	P1010121__Small_.JPG
Views:	145
Size:	72.4 KB
ID:	17179  

__________________
dwightdi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2005, 01:58 PM   #9
3 Rivet Member
 
1972 29' Ambassador
1968 22' Safari
Tyler , Texas
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 116
Cathodic corrosion protection

Quote:
Originally Posted by dwightdi
Airstreams are not ALL aluminum. In fact the salt air can cause a battery effect if there are other metals touching the aluminum. They call it galvanic corrosion. Contact with glavanized metals to aluminum will also cause the galvanized coating to erode much faster and then there is rusting of the underlying steel. The pictures are from an Airstream that spent time on the Maryland sea shore.
When I lived in Florida, I was advised to have my then-new Land Rover rustproofed because of its aluminum body. This involved a cathodic protection system that connected to the battery, and it really worked! Might such a system also work with Airstreams?
__________________
26.982 amu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2005, 10:28 AM   #10
3 Rivet Member
 
1972 29' Ambassador
1968 22' Safari
Tyler , Texas
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 116
Ruststop Cathodic Protection systems

I'm looking at this website, which deals with cathodic corrosion protection systems designed for cars. I talked to their sales rep, and it seems like just the ticket for Airstreams! The sacrificial anode is a pure aluminum strip. I would love to get some input from some of you on this before I actually buy the system (about $200) to install on my '69 Int'l Ambassador which will be parked near the ocean.

http://www.ruststopnorthamerica.com/contact-us.htm
__________________
26.982 amu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2005, 11:27 AM   #11
3 Rivet Member
 
1972 29' Ambassador
1968 22' Safari
Tyler , Texas
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vince Brach
I'm looking at this website, which deals with cathodic corrosion protection systems designed for cars. I talked to their sales rep, and it seems like just the ticket for Airstreams! The sacrificial anode is a pure aluminum strip. I would love to get some input from some of you on this before I actually buy the system (about $200) to install on my '69 Int'l Ambassador which will be parked near the ocean.

http://www.ruststopnorthamerica.com/contact-us.htm
I would be REALLY grateful if someone knowledgeable would give me some input on this! I've been reading about filiform corrosion, especially where salt is a problem, and it seems that a cathodic protection system would be just the ticket--especially if you plan to keep your AS polished!!
__________________
26.982 amu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2005, 01:20 PM   #12
Industrialist
 
ABRACADABRA's Avatar
 
Alexandria , .
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 27
Images: 2
Not on your Airstream!

Vince Brach,

You asked for it ... so hang on!

Cathodic protection is not gong to work with air as the medium. There is not enough continuous continuity for the flow of electrons to follow for protection. One needs an electrically conductive environment (i.e. environments containing enough ions to conduct electricity). Sea air doesn’t get it, undersea does.

Underwater, where the passage of electrons between a nobler and less noble metal occurs, the sacrifice of a material (galvanic anode – surface to protect is made the cathode)) is applicable. In this environment, the sacrificial material requires continuity with the metal intended to protect.

Even under water, isolation of the material to be protected, such as paint (e.g. your Airstream plasti-coat) is the primary defense of the skin material deteriorating. Coatings have been developed as a need to protect equipment from environmental damage. When the coating fails, or is scarred to expose the aluminum, corrosion sets in. (OXIDATION)
Aluminum, vastly different that ferrous materials, is a self-protecting material. It will corrode or oxidize enough to stop the exposure of oxygen and stop. You wash it off and do not re-coat it; it will corrode itself again, but only to the point of protecting itself from oxygen exposure. Some material will be lost in this process.

Unprotected steel forms a layer of iron oxide, which is permeable to air and water and allows corrosion to continue underneath. Therefor the POR 15 applications to frames, so prevelant within this Forum.

Galvanized steel (zinc-coated) is an interesting combination of materials. Zinc oxide (produced on the surface of zinc-protected objects) is impermeable, as long as the zinc and zinc oxide layers are undisturbed (i.e. not scraped or sanded off), the steel underneath will not rust. [This is the cool part] Galvanised steel has some self repairing properties; small scratches where the steel becomes exposed will be re-covered by the zinc. The zinc from the surrounding area will dissolve and be deposited on the steel, replacing what was lost to the scratch.

There is another steel, Cor-Ten steel. Somewhat different it the fact that it is slightly self protecting, although requires a total different dissertation. You see it used often in bridge construction. Not related to this discussion.

Now the (GALVANIC) inter-action of adjacent or connected dissimilar materials is somewhat of a different story. (e.g. clearance lights, etc.). There you have the passage again of electrons between the nobler and less noble metals occurring, and the less noble will deteriorate. Here, an isolation (dielectric) material should be used to avoid the direct contact of the two dissimilar materials. Isolation is the only solution to avoid corrosion in these types of fittings.

There is such a thing as impressed current cathodic protection, but here again you require the medium to allow continuous continuity for the flow of electrons. This system can be applied if the metal to be protected is coupled to the negative pole of a direct current (DC) source, while the positive pole is coupled to an auxiliary anode.

SUMMATION In an airborne environment, your best protection is an adequate coating. Minute areas where the coating may not have penetrated or has been slightly scarred, can be washed frequently and avoid any loss (deterioration/corrosion) of the material. Only re-coating the section or spot coating will stop corrosion. (need to eliminate the exposure to oxygen)

Now Ya’ll may want to pick this apart, or attempt to get technical, and that is your prerogative...

BUT THAT’S MY STORY & I’M STICKEN’ TO IT! It’s all chemical Magic!
__________________
"Its Majic"
ABRACADABRA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2005, 01:46 PM   #13
Creampuff
 
Creampuff's Avatar
 
1957 22' Flying Cloud
1971 31' Sovereign
1976 29' Ambassador
Malibu , California
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 513
Images: 60
I live over a mountain range 5 miles from the coast in CA. and can tell you that polishing without some kind of clearcoat protection is only going to lead to disappointment after as little as 6 months,
I have polished 2 trailers and seen the first go very bad due to proximity to salt air. I have experimented with a spray on clearcoat with modest success and am watching side by side test panels oxidize over a few months. The jury is still out as to whether this is the magic solution to the problem, primarily because it does take some of the high polishsd look down somewhat- but it does definitely seem to solve the oxidqtion issue. I plan on posting more on this as the tests become more conclusive.
Bottom line - IMHO, resist the temptation to polish until you can get away from the ocean.
I just bought a '58 Flying Cloud which I'm DYING to polish- but I'm NOT GOING THERE
(yet!!!)
__________________
Murray
AIR #189

"If aluminum isn't magnetic- why am I so attracted to to it?"
Creampuff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2005, 05:25 PM   #14
Rivet Master
 
1977 31' Sovereign
1963 26' Overlander
1989 34' Excella
Johnsburg , Illinois
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,941
Galvanic corrosion

Galvanized (zinc coated) steel in contact with unclearcoated aluminum in sea coast or salted road enviroments.

Zinc is higher than aluminum on the galvanic series and therefore corrodes and generates a battery, protecting the aluminum. That unfortunately, also means the zinc will rapidly deteriorate to protect the aluminum. The usual life expectancy of zinc coated fasteners will be greatly reduced. After the zinc is gone, the base steel will then immediately start to rust but because steel (iron) is lower on the galvanic table than aluminum the aluminum will also start to deteriorate to protect the iron. Pure aluminum (like on the surface of Alcad sheet) will form a protective oxide coating to help stop the corrosion of the aluminum and stop the protective effect of the aluminium.

Early WWII airplanes were made from an aluminum alloy called 2024 which contains a small amount of copper (so the material can be heat treated to give higher strength). Unfortunately, the planes in the Pacific and on carriers corroded badly because the alloy did not form a good protective barrier. As a result, they invented Alclad ( which is a sandwich of pure aluminum on the two outsides skins and a heat treatable 2024 core). This solved the problem. You can still buy the stuff.

Our trailers are not made with Alclad. The alloy Airstream uses had better corrosion resistance than 2024 but not as good as pure aluminum (which is pretty soft and has poor yeild strength properties). There are also some aluminum castings on some of the trailers. The alloy they use for these parts has poorer corrosion resistance than the sheet materials.

If you are going to use zinc coated steel fasteners or accesories (on the trailer in a salt seacoast enviroment) you should keep an eye on them and replace them as soon as they start showing rust. Another alternative is to use a plastic washer or gasket to prevent steel touching the aluminum. (I put HDPE washers under the bolts holding the belly skin on.) The zinc coating on the self tapping screws gets eaten by the salt or worn away quickly by the movement between the skin and the frame. The skin then corrodes leaving a big hole and no support.

If you have to use other than aluminum fasteners on the trailer, use stainless steel fasteners (insulating them should also be considered) wherever you can.
__________________

__________________
dwightdi is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Experiences with Carrier Air V installation? Sojourner Furnaces, Heaters, Fireplaces & Air Conditioning 10 04-29-2009 08:52 AM
Rear Air bags PeterH-Airstreamer Mechanics Corner - Engines, Transmission & More... 24 11-12-2007 07:02 PM
Heater and Air Conditioner Jeb Airstream Motorhome Forums 2 10-22-2002 08:45 AM
air horns uncleneal Airstream Motorhome Forums 1 08-16-2002 08:22 AM
Air streams in New York area?!? mitchm71 Our Community 0 07-25-2002 10:33 AM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.