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Old 02-21-2016, 10:11 AM   #15
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Thanks, Protagonist - I will plan for plenty of clearance per your suggestion, even a second bay to park the TV. There is a link above to the footing concept employed here (courtesy of Hansen Pole Buildings), and it will need to be sized for the loads. Fortunately, most of the suppliers have design programs that take into consideration all of the codes and local design requirements, so it's pretty easy for me other than the prerequisite research. I would like to have the concrete floor for obvious reasons, but it is not required here.

Good suggestions - much appreciated. I am a licensed (P.E.) civil engineer, so I am familiar with structural and geotechnical design criteria, but will not have to design the structure or stamp the drawings, as the suppliers offer this.

Thanks - Ron
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Old 02-21-2016, 03:22 PM   #16
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Perfect and you could leave one side open to enjoy the view
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Old 02-21-2016, 03:42 PM   #17
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What dimensions were you thinking of? I have a 30' trailer and was thinking of 40'x20'. A concrete pad helps keep down the dust.
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Old 02-21-2016, 03:45 PM   #18
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I built a pole barn about 9 years ago that houses my AS, assorted toys, and work shop. I bit the bullet and poured a concrete floor while building. I'm glad I did, because it would have been a pain to haul everything out of it to pour a floor later. I have no regrets in building it other than I probably should have made it larger. I suspect you will be glad you built it after you have it up.
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Old 02-21-2016, 03:48 PM   #19
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I should have added that the dimensions of my pole barn are 48' x 30'.
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Old 02-21-2016, 04:21 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nswhite View Post
What dimensions were you thinking of? I have a 30' trailer and was thinking of 40'x20'. A concrete pad helps keep down the dust.

Thanks for the additional comments. The overall footprint is planned as 36' wide by 48' long. This would include the main bay for the AS that's 22' wide (16' eave height), and an attached bay for the TV that's 14' wide. I also envision storing other things in there, like lawn mower etc. I agree that getting concrete in up front would be ideal.

Regards - Ron
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Old 02-21-2016, 10:56 PM   #21
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pole barn

Don't worry about the structural integrity of a pole barn. If you buy from a reputable dealer/erector you should have no problems. You should watch any contractor like a hawk though. They should use straight, treated poles and a rim purlin of straight treated, 2x6 at floor level, with a thickened edge. The rest of the lumber should be straight and erected quickly, then the metal sheeting installed before the structure sits in the sun too long. Best to pour the floor after the building is up so it will be inside out of the sun. The sun is very detrimental to fresh concrete.
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Old 02-22-2016, 12:00 AM   #22
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The sun is very detrimental to fresh concrete.
I've worked with concrete pavement, foundations, and the like for thirty years, and never heard that. It's not sunlight that's the problem, it's evaporation of moisture before the concrete has a chance to cure and develop sufficient strength. Fresh concrete should be kept moist and allowed to cure for a week or so, longer for high-strength concretes. Curing typically involves covering the finished concrete surface with wet burlap or similar moisture-retaining covers, so it's not exposed to sunlight anyway.

Here is what the Portland Cement Association has to say on the subject:
Quote:
Either additional moisture should be supplied to the concrete during the early hardening period or the concrete should be covered with water-retaining materials. In general, curing compounds should not be used on surfaces that are to receive protective surface treatments. If a curing compound is used, it must be completely removed before the surface treatment is applied, or it must be compatible with the surface treatment so as not to impair bond. Concrete should be kept moist and above 10 C (50 F) for the first week or until the desired strength is achieved. Longer curing periods increase resistance to corrosive substances by increasing strength and reducing permeability for all concrete mixtures.
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Old 02-22-2016, 12:50 AM   #23
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I've poured and finished concrete for more than 60 years and a combination of sun and temp has more efect on getting a good slab than just about anything. Poured hundreds of yards inside large buildings with the roofs on (no sun to speed setting) and had no cracks. Proper temps, slump, and enough finishers to handle it are also critical
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Old 02-22-2016, 01:00 AM   #24
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Poured hundreds of yards inside large buildings with the roofs on (no sun to speed setting) and had no cracks. Proper temps, slump, and enough finishers to handle it are also critical
All of the concrete I've worked with has been outdoors with no roof available or even possible. Roadways, floodwalls, and the like aren't often built indoors.
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Old 02-22-2016, 06:43 AM   #25
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Barns and wind

You do have ranches and some farms near you and I would visit a few with metal roofs and sides on the barns and get advise from them and not us who have no idea of wind strengths and snow fall for your area. I can say here in the South, telephone pole type structures hold up much better than steel beams bolted to concrete slabs when it comes to our straight line winds that can be over 80mpg in strong storms during cold fronts passing through. I have seen too many with heavy damage with buildings made out of concrete blocks next door having limited damage - maybe a little roof damage. All in all keeping your AS out of the hot sun will make having your barn well worth it. My 5th wheel is 12 years old and people think it is new or all most new when I pull in to camp ground. Protect your tires at all times with the high UV light in the desert areas or anywhere as far as that goes. A good barn cost a lot but so does an AS and protecting your investment is worth it and the barn should last longer than your AS and that is a long, long time if took care of. Take the advise about giving your self working room around and above your unit. That is a mistake I made due to the placement area of my RV barn and there are so many times I wish I had moved it to a larger area when having to two it out for everything but airing up the tires! Gravel flooring is cheaper by far over concrete and no worries over ground shifting.
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Old 02-22-2016, 07:12 AM   #26
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Thanks folks for the additional comments and pointers. I enjoyed hearing from you all.

Regards - Ron
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Old 02-22-2016, 09:26 AM   #27
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I built a Morton building for my 30' Airstream, full sized pickup and car plus storage and work space. My building is 30 X 40 with a 14' door in the end. I have to work to back my trailer in so it is on one side. My building is insulated with 2 inch styrofoam around the slab. It is my pride and joy. I live in Iowa where it gets cold and I heat my shed. It takes very little propane to keep it at 42. I can go out and turn up the heat and work on anything. Like I say this was one of my few good ideas. Only mistake was I built it with 14' side walls thinking I may want a motor home some day. Morton is worth the exta money.
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Old 02-22-2016, 10:32 AM   #28
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The discussion above regarding concrete and wood construction are a bit confusing. Since I worked in commercial construction for 40+ years (involved in pouring litterally 100's of acres of concrete) and I was a general contractor, I'll add my thoughts:

Properly treated wood as a foundation is allowed. Wood poles buried in the earth for a pole barn foundation is done everyday. Concrete may be required to support the wood, but maybe not. Friction of the earth against each pole and the pole bearing upon the earth may adequately support the pole. There is a section in the International Building Code that describes the methods. Local codes may limit or exclude this practice for some specific reason, but properly treated wood is generally allowed as a foundation in contact with earth.

Concrete can be affected by weather.
Initial curing and handling of the concrete during varying weather conditions may affect its strength and durability. There is too much detail to be included in this post. Most likely when you see the surface of concrete failing, it is due to the way the concrete was treated when it was in a semi solid state before it set up.
Cold (freezing) can damage cured concrete by freezing/thawing of moisture within the concrete. When the concrete is intended to be used in freezing conditions, additive products called "air entrainment" should be included in concrete. Air entrainment causes extremely small bubbles to form within the concrete when it is being mixed. These bubbles allow the concrete to be flexible enough to endure many freeze thaw cycles.
Heat causes expansion of cured concrete which in requires flexible (expansion) joints to allow this movement where the concrete comes in contact with a rigid surface.
As concrete cures initially or shrinks due to cooling, flexible (contraction) joints are required. Expansion joints also act as contraction joints, but additional flexible joints control joints (controlled cracking) may be cut through the slab or tooled into the top surface. This is done to create a point where stress created within the concrete by shrinkage can be relived.
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