Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-08-2014, 12:24 AM   #1
3 Rivet Member

 
1964 24' Tradewind
Lawrence , Kansas
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 201
70 mph Winds

I have been using a 10" by 10" by 18" wood block laid sideways and yellow stacking blocks with my tongue jack and for the second time this year the trailer was blown off the wood block. Both times I have also had my 4 jack stands set also. The wheels were blocked with campo plastic wheel chocks. Every thing was blown away from the trailer. The first time the trailer was in storage so I do not know the conditions but tonight we had 70 mph winds. Trailer is a single axle 24' 64 Tradewind. I am I doing something wrong? Is this normal for such high winds? Is there something I can do to make more stable?
__________________

__________________
ttbikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 01:30 AM   #2
Rivet Master
 
1974 Argosy 20
2014 20' Flying Cloud
Kooskia , Idaho
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 4,591
I can only share a couple of experiences.

Once camping on the Washington coast with my '63 Bambi I fortunately left it attached to my Mercedes 300 diesel. The wind blew so hard that night, I rocked and swayed and think if I had not been attached to the MB, it would have blown off the jack or moved in some other way. No idea of the actual wind, but it was a coastal gale.

I have friends who have a place just outside of Glacier Park, on the east side of the Rockies. Winds there can be very high, over 80 mph. I have stayed there and not been comfortable at all, front tongue jack down and stabilizers well cranked for solid footing. I have not been there in over 60 mph wind, but at 60, I wondered if it was going to stay put. It did.
__________________

__________________
idroba is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 01:45 AM   #3
Rivet Master
 
2005 19' Safari
GLENDALE , AZ
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 2,441
For 70 mph winds, it sounds like you should anchor your trailer down. You may wish to check with companies who anchor "manufactured homes" to see what's needed.

However, I would be worried about storm debris damaging your Tradewind. If you face this type of severe weather on a regular basis, you may wish to look into indoor or protected storage (if it's affordable).
__________________
Phoenix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 04:22 AM   #4
Rivet Monster
 
wahoonc's Avatar

 
1975 31' Sovereign
1980 31' Excella II
Sprung Leak , North Carolina
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 7,174
Images: 40
Point the nose into the wind?

Aaron
__________________
....so many Airstreams....so little time...
WBCCI #XXXX AIR #2495
Why are we in this basket...and where are we going
wahoonc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 06:41 AM   #5
3 Rivet Member

 
1964 24' Tradewind
Lawrence , Kansas
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 201
I normally keep in covered storage but I had it at the house to polish. Of course, on the one hand it is what you might expect. After all, trees and fences are down but since it has happened two times in 6 months it started me wondering if I was using an poor method for setting it up. Although I do not see that I am doing anything different than most others. The tongue jack, wood block, and 4 yellow blocks were not over extended.
__________________
ttbikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 08:10 AM   #6
Rivet Master
 
1976 31' Sovereign
Oswego , Illinois
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,330
Blog Entries: 1
If you can find set of rubber chocks like semi trailers use get them as it almost impossible to move trailer. I just had 80+ mph winds nothing moved exc. lost lots of trees. I think plastic blocks would be slippery when placed on wood.
__________________
featherbedder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 08:28 AM   #7
Rivet Master
 
mimiandrews's Avatar

 
1966 22' Safari
Weatherford , Texas
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,425
Big rubber chocks

Quote:
Originally Posted by featherbedder View Post
If you can find set of rubber chocks like semi trailers use get them as it almost impossible to move trailer. I just had 80+ mph winds nothing moved exc. lost lots of trees. I think plastic blocks would be slippery when placed on wood.
Northern Tool has them for $9 or so apiece.
__________________
mimiandrews is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 09:38 AM   #8
3 Rivet Member

 
1964 24' Tradewind
Lawrence , Kansas
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 201
Yes the plastic chocks have me wondering. They never have fit real tight and the wind had blown them away from the trailer. I got them because they were light weight. I think of chocks stoping forward and backward motion but maybe good ones would stop twisting motion also. Of course if the wind is strong enough nothing will help.
__________________
ttbikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 10:31 AM   #9
Rivet Master
 
1976 31' Sovereign
Oswego , Illinois
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,330
Blog Entries: 1
Smile chocks

Quote:
Originally Posted by ttbikes View Post
Yes the plastic chocks have me wondering. They never have fit real tight and the wind had blown them away from the trailer. I got them because they were light weight. I think of chocks stoping forward and backward motion but maybe good ones would stop twisting motion also. Of course if the wind is strong enough nothing will help.
Rubber semi chocks that I quoted, you use 2 one in front of wheel 1 in back trailer will not twist or roll forward or backwards. I forgot to pick mine up as it is one of last things to do. My big eng. pick up did not want to move trailer mine have eye bolts w/chain to hook together so both have to come out. I purloined mine when snow plowing truck docks a few yrs. ago
__________________
featherbedder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 10:43 AM   #10
Moderator
 
Kevin245's Avatar

 
Vintage Kin Owner
... , ...
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 9,390
Images: 9
Agree that rubber wheel chocks generally work best on paved surfaces.

My question is why are you storing with the stabilizers down/jack stands in place and the stab jack on a large wooden block?


Sent from my iPhone using Airstream Forums
__________________

"You wouldn't worry so much about what others think of you if you realized how seldom they do."

Eleanor Roosevelt

Kevin245 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 10:48 AM   #11
Rivet Master
 
mimiandrews's Avatar

 
1966 22' Safari
Weatherford , Texas
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,425
Use the heavy rubber chocks in front and back of the wheel(s) on both sides of the trailer. That blocks the twisting motion in two places.

Seat them on solid ground, if there is any. Drive them against the tire with a swift kick, but make sure they stay straight. Get as much contact, and therefore friction to resist movement, as possible.

The ones I got from Northern do have the rings for a rope.
__________________
mimiandrews is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 11:00 AM   #12
Rivet Master
 
1976 31' Sovereign
Oswego , Illinois
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,330
Blog Entries: 1
Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by mimiandrews View Post
Use the heavy rubber chocks in front and back of the wheel(s) on both sides of the trailer. That blocks the twisting motion in two places.

Seat them on solid ground, if there is any. Drive them against the tire with a swift kick, but make sure they stay straight. Get as much contact, and therefore friction to resist movement, as possible.

The ones I got from Northern do have the rings for a rope.
I only have 1 set have never had twisting or rolling, so I believe sets both sides are over kill, plus rope would be a little lighter but mine had chains all ready chains a little long for truck tires. They will work just as well on soft ground
__________________
featherbedder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 11:02 AM   #13
3 Rivet Member

 
1964 24' Tradewind
Lawrence , Kansas
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin245 View Post
Agree that rubber wheel chocks generally work best on paved surfaces.

My question is why are you storing with the stabilizers down/jack stands in place and the stab jack on a large wooden block?


Sent from my iPhone using Airstream Forums
Because I have it in my driveway and I am working on it. The Driveway slants enough that I need the wood block to level it. The stabilizers keep it from rocking while I polish it and work on things inside. But for the other side of question why would it not be more stable that way in storage also?
__________________
ttbikes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-08-2014, 11:21 AM   #14
Moderator
 
Kevin245's Avatar

 
Vintage Kin Owner
... , ...
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 9,390
Images: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by ttbikes View Post
...But for the other side of question why would it not be more stable that way in storage also?
The wood block certainly is big enough to provide a stable base for storage but I would recommend you add a piece of rubber floor mat between the wood and the stab jack base plate to increase the coefficient of friction. A piece of mat on the ground contact side would not hurt either. A few well place roofing nails should secure the mats.

As for the stabilizers, they are typically used for short duration applications rather than long term storage, and they are usually located at the outboard regions of the frame in most instances. Most tires lose air over the course of time which lowers the ride height and increases the load on the stabilizers. In most instances the stabilizers, or the area of the frame where they are placed is not designed to carry these kinds of loads and you may end up bending or crushing the stabilizers or part of the frame. I've seen this happen in more than one instance.

Regards,

Kevin
__________________

__________________

"You wouldn't worry so much about what others think of you if you realized how seldom they do."

Eleanor Roosevelt

Kevin245 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Slight jerking below 40 mph greatlakes Hitches, Couplers & Balls 16 02-14-2010 03:15 PM
TV vibration at 40-46 mph RLS Tow Vehicles 11 10-08-2008 09:46 AM
Tire popped off at 80 mph skin ripped 9/17/06 IndyAnne Ribs, Skins & Rivets 64 09-21-2006 09:40 PM
Hitch failure at 60 mph Nick Danger Hitches, Couplers & Balls 8 05-27-2006 08:28 AM
What is the correct RPM for 60 MPH? AccessMaster Airstream Motorhome Forums 9 12-31-2003 10:48 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.