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Old 04-23-2013, 06:26 AM   #1
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TremPro 635 -vs- OCI QUAD -vs- OCI H2U

Soo.... I posted in the General Repair forum before I saw this one. And the gist of my story is that I've got some small leaks coming from above the window where the previous owners had recently installed a window a/c unit.

I went down to Home Depot, and the only thing I could find in grey was OCI QUAD and DAP Dynaflex 230. But what I've read, Dynaflex 230 is actually part latex and part silicone. So the Dynaflex seems like a no go.

The OCI QUAD seems like the better choice, but I can't really determine what it is. All I can see is a bunch of mumbo jumbo marketing terms. Elastomerized polymers. Stuff like that. I guess it really is some new "synthetic", but it's not urethane... because they have another product called H2U for those "super duper professional" applications.

Anyway.... I should probly do this today, as it should be raining in the next couple days. I guess OCI QUAD is what I'll have to go with, because I don't think I can find TremPro 635 or OCI H2U before the day is up. I could cover the window with a couple towels if this urethane stuff is that much better than the QUAD, but I'm not sure how anyone could tell if it's better or not considering it's so difficult to find out what it is. Does QUAD have silicone?

Also, are there any tips for a first time caulker? Thinking about cutting a real small hole in the tip to do the roof seems, and then I'll open it up and do the windows, doors, etc. Would really like to keep this as simple as possible.
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Old 04-23-2013, 06:47 AM   #2
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Just use painter's tape, smooth with finger then remove tape promptly for a clean professional looking job.
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Old 04-23-2013, 07:14 AM   #3
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source for Trempro

FASTENAL can get Trempro for you. If I ordered it today, they'd have it for me tomorrow. You can get white for the roof and grey for the sides. Also, consider Parbond or Acrylar for exterior panel seams.
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Old 04-23-2013, 09:36 AM   #4
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TremPro 635
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Old 04-23-2013, 09:40 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dznf0g View Post
Just use painter's tape, smooth with finger then remove tape promptly for a clean professional looking job.
Bingo! This is it if you want a nice looking job when finished. I would also add, remove as much of the old caulk as possible which isn't as easy as it sounds.
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Old 04-23-2013, 11:15 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by dznf0g View Post
Just use painter's tape, smooth with finger then remove tape promptly for a clean professional looking job.
I'm sorry, but again... I'm a n00b.

You're saying to use painter's tape OVER the caulk, right??

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FASTENAL can get Trempro for you. If I ordered it today, they'd have it for me tomorrow. You can get white for the roof and grey for the sides. Also, consider Parbond or Acrylar for exterior panel seams.
I just called Fastenal, and they said if they can get it, it won't be in before Monday!!

I don't think I really need to do the roof panels. But I really need to do the window / awning seams. Pretty sure that's where my real problem is. I just figured if I could squeeze enough out for the roof seams, too... then why not? Truthfully, tho... I don't think too many people are going to be looking at the roof, so not all THAT concerned about how it looks.

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Sorry, the following item is currently out of stock: TremPro 635 Polyurethane
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Old 04-23-2013, 11:17 AM   #7
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So, does anybody have any real negative experience with the OSI QUAD??

It appears that it's "self-tooling", so tape shouldn't be necessary. Supposed to last a while. Just not sure about the silicone bit, seeing as how it's too "advanced" of a formula to explain to mere mortals.

I've heard good things, other than that it can get messy. So wondering how a n00b can avoid that problem.
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Old 04-23-2013, 11:28 AM   #8
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You put tape where you don't want caulk, and it gives you a nice crisp edge.

If you're caulking a seam put tape lines on either side of the seam, When you caulk cover the seam and the edges of the tape, then remove the tape. The caulk seam will be nice and straight and the area around the tape will be clean.
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Old 04-23-2013, 11:33 AM   #9
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Silicone is said to be bad for aluminum (however its what we use to seal the aluminum floor pans in replica cobras)
I've not used the QUAD but have seen it in the store and based on the info on the tube I have considered using it myself.

I would much rather use QUAD or even silicone than have water leaking in my trailer.

Another temporary option - when I first bought the Safari I had a bad leak around the rear window. Rain was comming and I didn't have time or materials to caulk the seam so I resorted to the handyman's secret weapon - ductape. The tape kept the water out for the week of rain we had, and other than some glue remover to get the tape off it worked very well.
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Old 04-23-2013, 11:36 PM   #10
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So I finally decided to get off my ass today, and I got everything to start sealing the windows and doors... but I figured I'd rather take the carpet and padding out first.

Removing the 6' by 6' carpet was no biggie... but removing the padding was a real chore, because somebody decided to glue virtually every square inch of it. Anyway, got it all out right before sunset and got everything I needed to finish the job at sunrise tomorrow.

But there was a very small area, maybe 6 in. x 6 in., where there was mold growing on the wood. Did a little researching about using bleach water, but that appeared to be a "no no" for a number of reasons. Turns out that home remedies are better, so I used what I had on hand --- some 3% hydrogen peroxide scrubbed in for a couple minutes, left to sit for around 10 minutes, then dried... and finally, some 5% vinegar sprayed on and left for just over an hour, then patted dry.

Long story, short.... I think that the door and all the windows are leaking. Can't really tell about the rest of the trailer, but I'm gonna be caulking everything I can tomorrow.

Whole reason I came here, tho, was to mention that I think I discovered the "secret" of OSI's Quad Formula. It seems to be awfully similar to the attributes of a rubber sealant....

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Quote:
Here's a look at the four types of caulk.

Rubber caulks. These products are made with rubber compounds like butyl, isoprene, butadiene, nitrile and styrene. Rubber caulks typically offer good adhesion and excellent water resistance; you can even apply them to damp surfaces. But their solvents are highly flammable and dangerous to breathe, so don't use these caulks indoors. Rubber caulks are especially sticky and difficult to tool, and they will shrink as they cure. Without any tooling, a round bead will dry fairly flat.

Latex caulks. Also labeled as acrylic or vinyl caulks and sealants, these water-based products are the easiest to use, will handle the broadest range of applications and are often the least expensive. However, many latex caulks aren't as durable as more expensive options. "Siliconized" latex caulks contain small amounts of silicone for improved durability and adhesion.

Latex caulks don't contain volatile solvents that pose fire and health hazards, and joints are easy to tool. But avoid removing too much material when tooling, because shrinkage will further reduce the width of the caulk joint. A broad range of colors is available, including hues that match most plumbing fixtures. Water-based caulks can be also be painted.

Silicone caulks. These products stay flexible at all temperatures, are completely waterproof and adhere to a wide range of materials. They are excellent all-weather caulks that can also be used in wet indoor locations, primarily around tubs and shower stalls. However, because silicone is expensive and offers poor tear and abrasion resistance, it's not a good choice in high-traffic areas. Except in water-based versions, this family of caulks is unpaintable and difficult to tool. Among solvent-based silicones, caulks or sealants labeled "neutral cure" or "odorless" are preferable because they don't give off any unpleasant odor as they cure. Plus, the acetic acid produced as "smelly" silicones cure can corrode certain metals and masonry surfaces.

Polyurethane sealants. Just like polyurethane varnishes, this family of caulks and sealants is superdurable. Abrasion and tear resistance are superior to silicone, and the caulk is highly adhesive, waterproof and flexible. Shrinkage is minimal, and most polyurethane formulations can be painted or stained. Because it's expensive, this caulk should be used sparingly -- only where strength, durability and weather resistance are important. Tooling is messy and difficult, and you need to clean up with solvent.
All of those rubber sealant attributes apply to OSi's Quad sealant -- flexible, can be applied while wet, flammable, not recommended indoors, sticky, difficult to tool... tho, no need to tool, as it is "self-tooling", sinking as it cures.

I guess it's OK, but if I could find some polyurethane, I'd probly do that just because it would most likely last longer, even tho OSI's Quad sealant should last a long time. Rubber is quick and easy, but polyurethane is for life.
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Old 04-23-2013, 11:58 PM   #11
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Actually, I just finished reading the article, and OSI Quad is considered a "synthetic rubber".... so the ONLY area where polyurethane beats out this synthetic rubber is in terms of abrasion resistance (i.e. - high traffic areas, such as floors).

OSI Quad could be a butyl rubber, as well, which would mean it's one of the most water resistant of them all. OSI Quad seems to be one of the best choices for outter seams and such.

Anyway, I definitely need to hit the sack now in order to wake up early. G'nite all....
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Old 05-19-2015, 08:33 PM   #12
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I discovered today two things which make it impossible for average citizens to buy TremPro 635 (or any TremPro products) in Canada:
  • Tremco, the manufacturer of TremPro products, now have an exclusivity deal in place with Fastenal for all retail sales of TremPro in Canada.
  • Fastenal also changed their policy and will no longer sell to non-commercial buyers and minimum purchase is case lot quantity.
You need to have a business number to buy but worse yet, how would a normal Airstream owner need 12 or 24 (can't remember the case quantity) unless he was into some heavy re-do?

Very disappointed.
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