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Old 09-01-2014, 02:18 PM   #1
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Replacing the grey plastic glazing strip

Is there a youtube video out there that shows how to replace the grey plastic strips holding the glass in on the 196X windows?
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Old 09-01-2014, 03:20 PM   #2
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What year is your trailer? I guess it wouldn't say "x" if you know...but windows for a 66, 67, 68 are a universe of their own.
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Old 09-01-2014, 03:32 PM   #3
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I had to replace the flat glass under all three of the curved windows (had to replace them as well) in my 68. I worried with the first one half a day and the third took only an hour or so. I wish I remembered the "trick" but I do remember that a wide and narrow putty knife and some water with dish soap helped me get the the gasket to slide into place. It will just punch down into the frame if slick with Dawn dish soap. Do take time and cut and fit the miters for the corners very carefully, a new sharp razor blade or exacto knife helps, as the bottom corners are prone to leaks. I did use s thin bead of vulem between the glass and the aluminum frame and a thin dab in the bottom corners.
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Old 09-03-2014, 01:52 AM   #4
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Sorry for not being more specific. I have a 1963 Bambi. I did not realize there was so much variation during the '60's

All my pieces are flat glass, all have brittle and chipped hard grey plastic on the outside

I have seen some threads that describe removing the glass from the inside, some that seem to use soft flexible gaskets.

If mine are just flat glass, maybe it's simpler than most. Kind of hoping somebody had done a video on how to remove & refurbish.
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Old 09-03-2014, 08:48 AM   #5
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I struggled to get mine in at first. I couldn't get the plastic to snap down properly. Then I had the "brilliant" idea of applying a little heat with a heat gun. That softened the plastic and allowed me to push the plasitc in place. That turned out to be a big mistake. I now have to replace all of the ones that I used heat on because they are pulling away from the glass. After a little practice, I found that if I twisted the plastic while applying pressure with my thumbs I could get them to seat correctly.

I also noticed the other day that gaps have formed at some of my mitered corners. About 3/16-inch. I got some grey caulk to fill the gaps but haven't installed it yet. I guess in the future I'll cut the miters a little big, as there seems to be some shrinkage.

I assume that you do know that the strips are available at Vintage Trailer Supply. I'd suggest ordering extra. These things aren't very forgiving of mistakes.
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Old 09-03-2014, 09:36 AM   #6
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I just did this repair on my '68 Overlander. The flat glass is easiest to replace. The replacement parts all came from my local hardware store. They cut "double strength" glass for me and supplied the rubber spline from their window repair shop where they use it to make storm windows. The replacement spline was more rubbery than the original. It was very easy to work with and very inexpensive ($0.25/foot).

Get the glass just 1/8" smaller than the frame so that your splines fit tightly. Bring in your old spline to get one that matches closely. The spline gets compressed between the glass and the aluminum lip to hold the glass tightly in place. The Vulkem that you put between the glass and the frame is what really makes it water tight.

Clean the face of the aluminum frame that contacts the glass. On mine, this is sort of ribbed a bit. I used a nylon bristled brush on a drill to remove all old sealant (PO put silicone on there so mechanical removal was the only real option). If you choose to miter the spline make it generously long and do not stretch it when you install it. If you do, it will retract over time and you will have gaps. If things are sealed correctly between the glass and the aluminum, this is just a cosmetic problem. I let my spline overlap at the corners.

Put a generous bead of vulkem on the face of the frame. Press the glass into it and hold it in place while you push the spline into place with a putty knife pushing almost straight down. You might need three hands for this part. The spline locks into the aluminum extrusion when pushed in far enough. After you install all spline, use your putty knife to remove the squished out Vulkem on the window glass and then clean up the edges with a rag soaked in paint thinner.

I was able to go from very leaky windows to completely leak free windows rather quickly. Very rewarding.

You state your spline goes on the outside so maybe it is a bit different, but I am guessing the basics are the same.
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Old 09-03-2014, 10:01 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunkroom View Post
I just did this repair on my '68 Overlander. The flat glass is easiest to replace. The replacement parts all came from my local hardware store. They cut "double strength" glass for me and supplied the rubber spline from their window repair shop where they use it to make storm windows. The replacement spline was more rubbery than the original. It was very easy to work with and very inexpensive ($0.25/foot).

Get the glass just 1/8" smaller than the frame so that your splines fit tightly. Bring in your old spline to get one that matches closely. The spline gets compressed between the glass and the aluminum lip to hold the glass tightly in place. The Vulkem that you put between the glass and the frame is what really makes it water tight.

Clean the face of the aluminum frame that contacts the glass. On mine, this is sort of ribbed a bit. I used a nylon bristled brush on a drill to remove all old sealant (PO put silicone on there so mechanical removal was the only real option). If you choose to miter the spline make it generously long and do not stretch it when you install it. If you do, it will retract over time and you will have gaps. If things are sealed correctly between the glass and the aluminum, this is just a cosmetic problem. I let my spline overlap at the corners.

Put a generous bead of vulkem on the face of the frame. Press the glass into it and hold it in place while you push the spline into place with a putty knife pushing almost straight down. You might need three hands for this part. The spline locks into the aluminum extrusion when pushed in far enough. After you install all spline, use your putty knife to remove the squished out Vulkem on the window glass and then clean up the edges with a rag soaked in paint thinner.

I was able to go from very leaky windows to completely leak free windows rather quickly. Very rewarding.

You state your spline goes on the outside so maybe it is a bit different, but I am guessing the basics are the same.
The original tempered glass windows for the 66, 67 and 68 trailers is still available.

67 and 68 windows are very easy to replace.

The hinge is held together with screws that are located in the inside part of the hinge.

Double sided sticky tape is used on both sides at the top, to mount the window into the hinge.

That's all there is to it.

Andy
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Old 09-03-2014, 09:52 PM   #8
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Just dive in. If you mess up, you mess up, and you try again and then you're an expert!
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Old 09-03-2014, 10:06 PM   #9
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AK,
On a 63, the glass is held in with the plastic trim that you are familiar with. There is also a thin piece of mastic between the glass and frame.
If somebody got in there with silicone then the notch that snaps to the plastic piece needs to be cleaned. If the glass is missing the mastic and glued into place with silicone then the plastic trim will not stay snapped in. You will need to remove the glass, clean it up and rebuild with the mastic. The mastic adds thickness that is important in getting the plastic to 'snap' and stay
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Old 09-04-2014, 12:49 AM   #10
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My prior post may not exactly apply to a '63 window. You may have luck finding a replacement spline at a full service hardware store. The rubber one I used was much more functional than the hard plastic one.

Andy- the thread is about flat glass windows. Your reply refers to curved glass windows in the '67-'68. It was a nice description of that, however .
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Old 09-04-2014, 06:02 PM   #11
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thanks HiHo, that is how it seemed.

Are these hard plastic strips prone to shrinkage, or does that only apply to the soft gasket material?
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Old 09-04-2014, 07:40 PM   #12
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Quote:
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thanks HiHo, that is how it seemed.

Are these hard plastic strips prone to shrinkage, or does that only apply to the soft gasket material?
I bought replacement pieces from Vintage Trailer Supply and it's been on my '63 for a couple of years, no shrinkage to-date. From the feel of the material and my experience in different types of plastics used in molding and extruding, I don't believe it will shrink.
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Old 09-04-2014, 09:43 PM   #13
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I bought replacement pieces from Vintage Trailer Supply and it's been on my '63 for a couple of years, no shrinkage to-date. From the feel of the material and my experience in different types of plastics used in molding and extruding, I don't believe it will shrink.
Some of mine shrunk a little bit. Maybe 1/8" to 3/16" over about 24" length. They are the same hard grey plastic strips from Vintage Trailer Supply. They've only been on for about six months.
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Old 09-04-2014, 09:46 PM   #14
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No video, but I did a post here about the 1963 windows.

A 1963 Airstream Overlander named Moonraker: September 2013
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