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Old 01-15-2009, 09:22 AM   #1
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interior seam sealing

What is the consensus on interior seam sealing as far as removing the old "tar?" I've attached a shot of the interior showing what is there. There are spots that are peeling off and are cause for concern leak-wise. Do most people just add automotive sealer to patch it up or do some people wirebrush the old stuff out and start fresh? What options are there for sealant (non-VOC is what I'm after, if I understand correctly).
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Old 01-15-2009, 10:32 AM   #2
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What is the consensus on interior seam sealing as far as removing the old "tar?" I've attached a shot of the interior showing what is there. There are spots that are peeling off and are cause for concern leak-wise. Do most people just add automotive sealer to patch it up or do some people wirebrush the old stuff out and start fresh? What options are there for sealant (non-VOC is what I'm after, if I understand correctly).
Scrape off the old stuff, and then apply generous coatings of Vulkem.

You can spread the Vulkem with a stick, a piece of metal or plastic, like a Bondo spreader.

Andy
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Old 01-15-2009, 11:34 AM   #3
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Thanks for the advise, Andy. Is it easiest to use a wire-wheel brush on a drill for the removal?
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Old 01-15-2009, 01:23 PM   #4
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Thanks for the advise, Andy. Is it easiest to use a wire-wheel brush on a drill for the removal?
That would be far better than a putty knife, or chisel.

Just don't get things "hot".

Andy
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Old 09-09-2013, 11:15 AM   #5
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I don't mean to bring up a very much dead thread, however it makes more sense to me than starting an new one. Should one be concerned with the type of metal used in the wire-wheel? A good friend of mine who knows much more about metals and different reactions one gets when used together suggested that I use a stainless steel brush to avoid some sort of long lasting chemical reaction/oxidation. Does this sound right or is it a little over the top?

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Old 09-09-2013, 12:58 PM   #6
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I doubt that wheel composition would make much difference. frankly I just attacked the tar on a sunny day assuming it would be a little softer and used the same sharpened putty knife I had for cutting hidden rivets. Took about 5 minutes to remove 24' of seam pretty cleanly. I worry a bit about the heat generated by the wheel remelting the tar and then flinging it around to stick wherever. I am only removing the tar from seams that I am reriveting or where leaks are already occuring. Doesn't make sense to rework seams that are not problematic. The main sealing effort should be on the outside, the inside is just added insurance.
tim
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